MBA Programs

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Brexit Could Cost MBA Jobs And Business School Applications...

UK’s business schools have been left reeling from the nation’s exit from the EU, with applications, jobs prospects and research funding now potentially at risk. Brexit threatens to harm the UK’s standing as a hub for elite universities, and Friday’s referendum result has placed the nation’s entire higher education sector into a period of uncertainty. Andrew Likierman, dean of London Business School, says: “Speaking personally, I am concerned at the implications of the result for the UK.” The UK is home to 14 of Europe’s top-ranked business schools by the FT. UK schools rely on their global standing to attract talent. But there are growing fears that the UK’s anti-EU sentiment will affect universities’ ability to recruit applicants. The proportion of British students in UK MBA programs has fallen from 58% in 2007-2008 to just 49% today, according to the Higher Education Statistics Agency. Brexit could not only turn potential students sour on the UK’s schools, but could also make it more difficult for schools to recruit faculty. For instance, 60% of Oxford University’s Saïd Business School professors are from outside the UK. Saïd did not respond to a request for comment. Ian Looker, education lead partner at PwC, says: “Not only is the research funding provided by the EU now at threat, but also the potential tighter controls over EU staff and students coming to the UK could well present UK universities as less attractive options to work and study.” LBS’ Andrew says: “For higher education as a whole, and London Business School in particular, this should not give the signal that the UK has turned inwards. We are a global school and I believe that the UK will remain an outstandingly attractive place to study.” Brexit could...

Where To Go To Business School Based On Your Personality Type...

There are many ways we describe our personalities — bubbly, independent, charismatic, innovative, enthusiastic, etc — and our personalities are a huge part of who we are. As such, when making a decision about where you should go to business school, it’s important to consider how your personality type would do at different schools. A popular personality test is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), which ultimately allows a person to classify themselves using bigger characteristics — Extraversion (E), Introversion (I), Sensing (S), Intuition (N), Thinking (T), Feeling (F), Judging (J), and Perceiving (P), which led to the creation of 16 basic personality profiles. These 16 profiles can more broadly be sorted into four categories — Analysts, Diplomats, Sentinels, and Explorers — with four different personalities per category. You can easily take a test to figure out what type of personality you are, and then use your results to help you figure out the right school for you. Here’s a rundown of some of the best business school programs for certain personality types according to the MBTI. Logician (INTP). Logicians are innovative inventors with an unquenchable thirst for knowledge. Some of the common characteristics of this personality type include strong creativity, enthusiasm for new ideas, rationality, and imagination. As Logicians are more suited for independent learning and less rules, colleges like Cornell University, Rice University, Princeton University, and University of Texas – Austin would be better fits for this personality type. Commander (ENTJ). Commanders are described as bold, imaginative and strong-willed leaders, who always find a way — or make one. Some of the common characteristics of this personality type include natural leadership skills, charisma, confidence, and determination. There are a number of universities with exceptional business school programs that...

What Employers Think of Your Online MBA Degree...

When Michael Urtiaga goes on job interviews, he regularly gets asked the question, “How were you able to balance an MBA education at Indiana University’s Kelley School of Business with your previous full-time job near Cincinnati?” The answer: The 36-year-old, who’s now in between jobs, pursued his MBA online through the Kelley Direct program – not by traveling to the school on the weekends, as some interviewers initially assume given that he lives about a two-hour drive away from the campus. Urtiaga says interviewers generally seem accepting of his online degree given the strong reputation of the school. Still, he sometimes needs to answer questions about the pros and cons of online learning and the real-world benefits the online program offers. “Oftentimes, you can see their faces change as you go through the conversation,” says Urtiaga, who completed his MBA last year and is now pursuing an online master’s in strategic management as part of a dual degree program at Kelley. There’s still a bit of a stigma, he says, but people usually come around when they hear some of the format’s virtues. Recruiters say most employers accept job candidates’ online MBAs from respected schools, especially now that the quality of an online MBA education at many institutions is equivalent to one on a physical campus. But in some cases, experts say, there’s still the need to educate companies about the legitimacy of many online programs. A significant portion of employers won’t even ask about the format in which the degree was earned, says Adam J. Samples, regional president of Atrium Staffing in New Jersey. Others will only dig deeper if they have a specific reason to – as in Urtiaga’s case, where they see he worked while pursuing...

Cheap MBAs: Costly for some

THERE’S no such thing as a free lunch. That maxim should be ingrained in the minds of business-school students, attuned to the notion of opportunity cost or Milton Friedman’s economic theories. Yet to believe the American non-profit University of the People (UoPeople), run by Shai Reshef, an Israeli entrepreneur, something close to a free lunch could soon be available to prospective MBA students. On March 15th the university opened applications for an MBA without tuition fees that it plans to launch in September 2016. That much is admirable, and certainly should be applauded. But don’t prepare to burn Friedman’s 1975 tome yet: there’s still no such thing as a free lunch. One hundred successful applicants will be enrolled onto the 15-month distance-learning course, and will be asked to pay just $200 for each of the 12 courses they will take as part of the programme. That is still a pittance, and a minuscule fraction of the cost of an MBA at the sort of business schools ranked by The Economist. “The cost of an MBA today is so expensive that many people who are qualified to achieve it cannot afford it,” Mr Reshef said when announcing his plans. Certainly, business schools can be rarefied places. So the development of a legitimate MBA at a low cost could be beneficial. Russell Winer, professor of marketing at NYU Stern and the leader of the MBA programme at UoPeople, told The Economist that the establishment can offer a cheaper programme than most by being online-only and lean-staffed. It also has the backing of faculty members from other big business schools, including INSEAD, Wharton and Oxford, all of whom have helped develop the curriculum. And yet the devil is in the detail. Some...

14 MBA Programs That Lead to Jobs

Landing that first job is a major concern for MBA students, and some programs are more likely to lead to success than others. Among the 129 business schools that submitted job placement data to U.S. News in an annual survey, two of them – the University of South Florida and Coastal Carolina University in South Carolina – saw 100 percent of MBA graduates who sought jobs employed three months after completing their degrees in 2015. Both of these schools, however, were ranked by U.S. News in the bottom one-fourth of the 2017 Best Business Schools rankings. In comparison, Washington University in St. Louis’ Olin Business School, the highest-ranked school among the 14 MBA programs with the highest employment rates, had a job placement rate of 97.1 percent. None of the 14 schools with the highest job placement rates ranked above No. 21 in the graduate business school rankings. Overall, top-ranked schools had higher enrollments and, therefore, many more graduates looking for jobs after graduation. For instance, Harvard University, ranked No. 1, had 672 full-time grads seeking employment and a job placement rate of 91.1 percent by three months after graduation. Of all the schools that submitted these data, Florida International University came out on the bottom of the list with a job placement rate of 27.3 percent – significantly lower than both the overall average of 83.9 percent and the average for the top 14 of 97.1 percent. Below is a list of the 14 full-time MBA programs where the highest percentages of job-seeking graduates were employed three months after graduating in 2015. Unranked schools, which did not meet certain criteria required by U.S. News to be numerically ranked, were not considered for this report. School (name) (state) |...

What is a free MBA worth in the marketplace?

Coming soon: a tuition-free MBA. It was announced this week from University of the People, which already offers no-tuition bachelor’s degrees. The idea of its new degree is to extend advancement opportunities to people who can’t afford graduate business education. The question is whether an MBA from an untested new program will be worth their time, as many employers may be skeptical of a new degree from an online program. Tuition alone for an MBA from an elite school typically tops $120,000 over two years. A University of the People graduate will pay only about $2,400 in fees. Expenses stay low through online classes and support from foundations. University president and founder Shai Reshef is realistic when it comes to competing with other business schools. “People who can get into great universities which will cost a great amount of money, if they can do it and afford it, they should do it,” he said. The idea is to create a space where people who could never afford any MBA can pick up skills that’ll advance their careers. University of the People’s program is accredited and professors from top global business schools are supporting it. But despite its credentials, it’s still hard for managers who might hire these graduates to gauge the value of a degree from such a new and unusual program. “I’ll be curious to see how employers look at that,” said Russ Poulin, policy and analysis director at WCET, a nonprofit that tracks online higher education. “It is not a brand that is well known.” The value of the degree could increase over time if the program’s reputation grows. University of the People’s undergrad program has already attracted thousands of students from around the world. Reshef said...

Online Tool Helps Prospective Students Find the Right MBA Program...

Prospective MBA students have a new tool to use when trying to find the right school: the “MBA Rankings Calculator.” Designed by the University of Washington’s Foster School of Business, the web-based tool allows users to create a custom list of MBA programs by choosing the factors that matter most to them, including salary and placement, employer reputation, and return on investment. Around 250,000 students in the US pursue an MBA each year, and according the US Department of Education the average cost for a year in an MBA program is $30,000. That means the MBA market amounts to more than $8 billion annually. It’s a big business and rankings play a strong role in guiding early decision-making. The Foster School’s Rankings Calculator was developed to help MBA applicants make informed decisions and access diverse rankings metrics in one convenient place. Prospective and current MBA students helped shape the calculator design and select the metrics. “Obviously, we urge MBA candidates to always consider the culture, the community, the location, the student services, program performance and other areas that matter to them when choosing an MBA program,” said Dan Poston, assistant dean of master’s programs at the Foster School. “But we know for nearly all candidates the rankings are a consideration. Not only does this tool help them filter data from multiple rankings to see the results that that are most important to them…it’s just fun to explore how school rankings change based on different priorities.” To achieve this, the calculator leverages data licensed from U.S. News & World Report, Bloomberg Businessweek, The Financial Times, Forbes and M7 Financial. Prospective applicants distribute 100 points across up to 10 metrics. Based on the results, candidates can fine-tune their formula to develop...

World’s first smartphone-based MBA launched...

The London School of Marketing has launched the world’s first ever MBA that students can study on their smart phones. The UK based educator has invested in a unique interactive online learning platform. It allows its learners direct access to course tutors, all the essential books and learning materials they’ll need, via their mobile phone. There’s also a community forum where students can chat directly with other students studying on their course and thereby learn from each other. This innovative approach to education means its learners can study when and where they want without being tied to a time or location. Since its launch, hundreds of students have already signed up to use the technology with more expected to follow. The courses it offers via smart phone include an MBA in business studies, a Masters and two undergraduate courses in the same subject. Its professional marketing course can also be accessed via smart phones. These courses are proving popular with international business executives who prefer to study from their home country rather than live and study in the UK. CFO of London School of Marketing, Anton Dominique explains: “They can study at a time and place to suit them and we’ve adapted the technology we use to make that happen. Everyone has a smartphone now, so it makes sense to run courses which our students can access while they’re on the move… Read full story: Khaleej...

How many Indian CEOs have an MBA?

Does one need to have an MBA to ascend to the top of Indian companies? Not necessarily, but it helps. A Mint analysis shows that 144 of the CEOs of BSE 500 companies, India’s largest listed firms that make up 90% of its market capitalisation, have an MBA. Details were available for only 466 companies. Here, the term MBA is used loosely, to also include the much sought after post graduate diploma in business management or PGDBM that is awarded by the Indian Institutes of Management or IIMs. No other educational qualification comes close. Interestingly 81 of the CEOs are engineers but it is likely that many of the 144 CEOs with MBAs are engineer-MBAs. The Indian Institute of Technology and Indian Institute of Management Combination was and is a popular one. Still, there are 322 companies whose CEOs are not MBAs and it is evident that a B-school background may not be necessary to rise to the top — even in the case of professional managers. Here are five charts on the educational background of India’s top CEOs…Read full story:...

MBA Rankings: Take With A Pinch Of Salt

The MBA is a global phenomenon. From its humble beginnings with four students taking the Master of Science in Commerce at Dartmouth College’s Tuck School more than a century ago, it is now the world’s most popular postgraduate program. In 2011/12, the latest year for which figures are available, 191,571 students graduated from U.S. universities with masters degrees in business, up 65% on a decade before and a 620% increase on the figure 40 years ago. Business courses now make up more than a quarter of all masters degrees, compared with one in four as recently as 2000. All this makes MBAs big business. Average tuition for a two year MBA is around $60,000, although factoring in living costs and other expenses can take the total cost from a leading business school up towards $200,000. Add the opportunity cost of quitting a job for two years and it becomes more eye-watering still. Little wonder that prospective MBA students spend many hours scouring ranking tables to try to work out if that investment is going to pay off. And when faced with such a bewildering choice of business schools, these rankings are invaluable. They allow students to compare business schools on a range of factors, from the average score in admission tests of new entrants to the salary bump for graduates…Read full story:...

Insead tops ‘Financial Times’ MBA rankings...

Insead, the business school with campuses in France, Singapore and Abu Dhabi, has topped the Financial Times’ Global MBA rankings for the first time since they were introduced in 1999. This is the first time that an MBA programme with a substantial Asian presence has been ranked number one by the Financial Times , and marks a growing interest from elite students in Asian business and business schools. Insead is still the only top-ranked business school to teach its full-time MBA on multiple campuses, with 75 per cent of the 1,000 students studying in Singapore or in Fontainebleau, just outside Paris. It is also the first time a one-year MBA programme has been ranked in the top slot. The flagship MBA programmes of the four previous winners – Harvard Business School, Stanford GSB and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in the US, and London Business School in the UK – are all two-year degrees. These schools have been ranked in the top five slots along with Insead for the past three years by the FT. The full-time MBA programme at UCD Michael Smurfit Graduate Business School has been ranked 79th in the world and 24th in Europe in the survey. The school had been ranked 73rd in the 2015 rankings. The Insead MBA was the world’s first one-year programme when it began in 1959, though many others have followed. As the cost of studying for an MBA has steadily risen, many students are wary of taking on the debt associated with two-year degrees – students are frequently more than $100,000 in debt when they graduate. Though fees and living costs can be substantial, it is often the opportunity cost of lost salary that is the biggest...

The 19 best online MBA programs

An MBA can be a shortcut for ascending the career ladder and boosting your salary. While attending one of best b-schools in the world can be an attractive option — Business Insider published its list of the world’s 50 best business schools in December — for some working professionals it’s not feasible, making online programs a great alternative. U.S. News & World Report recently released their ranking of the best online MBA programs, evaluating schools based solely on data related to their distance education MBA programs in five categories: student engagement, admissions selectivity, peer reputation, faculty credentials and training, and student services and technology. (You can read a full breakdown of the methodology here.) Note that because of multiple ties, the ranking only goes through No. 15. Temple University’s online MBA program took the top spot, followed by Indiana University at Bloomington, and University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Read on for the rest of the 19 best online MBA programs in the country, according to U.S. News.Read full story: Business...