Articles that mention Stanford Business School

Harvard and Stanford MBAs Are Using This Brazilian Network To Land Jobs In Latin America...

Deep in the Latin America’s biggest economy, a network of MBAs from some of the US’s top schools is stirring. Founded by Patricia Volpi over a decade ago, the exclusive MBA Alumni Brasil community has grown to nearly 2,200 members, from 50 business schools including Harvard Business School and Stanford GSB. “The group has really taken off,” says the Indiana, Kelley School graduate. MBAAB helps graduates network and find MBA jobs through company visits, “happy hour” drinks doos, from São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Belo Horizonte to Miami, New York and London, and job postings from companies such as Bloomberg, Microsoft and Nestlé. “The exchange of job opportunities drove the group,” says Patricia, who has worked at Frost & Sullivan, Telefonica and GNext, a recruitment firm. But Brazil is mired by a political crisis and a faltering economy. Its president, Dilma Rousseff, has been suspended and its central bank forecasts GDP to contract 3.5% in 2016. “One of the challenges was finding jobs that met MBAs’ salary expectations,” Patricia says. Below, BB speaks to two members of the MBAAB network working in São Paulo. A Hub For Entrepreneurs With a large financial center, well-regarded universities, and local heroes such as Dafiti, the e-commerce business backed with $250 million of venture capital, the city has a growing start-up ecosystem. “São Paulo is the best region in Brazil for entrepreneurs,” says Ric Scheinkman. The local entrepreneur is managing director and founding partner of Harpia Capital, an advisory and investment firm. He plans to study for an MBA at University of Miami, and says the MBAAB network has introduced him to top-level executives and entrepreneurs in São Paulo. “It has some of the best and brightest of the Brazilian business community,”...

Read Like an MBA: Top 5 Books Ivy Leaguers Read in Business School...

Want to get an Ivy League MBA education without the six-figure cost? It’s simple: read like an MBA student! We dug into the best school’s required reading lists Take a look at what MBA seekers at America’s top Ivy League schools are reading. Harvard Scaling Up Excellence: Getting to More Without Settling for Less by Robort Sutton and Huggy Rao “A great read that provides read, practical advice whether you’re a team of five or fifty thousand.” ––Lazlo Bock, Senior Vice President of People Operations, Google In Scaling Up Excellence, bestselling author, Robert Sutton and Stanford colleague, Huggy Rao Sutton offer a comprehensive guide to management in a package of enticing stories, subtly supported by references to high-end research. Their personal history in the Silicon Valley and their global access to interesting organizations provides a relevant backdrop. The main theme is that, while many good practices exist in organizations, they either get lost or there are difficulties when attempts are made to spread them (scale them) across the organization. The breadth of this theme means that this book will provide value to anyone who would like to see organizations improve. The benefits are not limited by industry, functional area or organizational size. Stanford What books do alumni from the Stanford Graduate School of Business recommend? Here’s one: Orbiting the Giant Hairball: A Corporate Fool’s Guide to Surviving with Grace by Gordon MacKenzie “It was written by a guy who made Hallmark cards. It’s about maintaining creativity in a corporate structure.” ––Tristan Walker, founder of Walker & Company Any business can morph into a giant hairball, a tangled, impenetrable mass of rules, traditions, and systems based on what worked in the past that can plunge it into mediocrity. Gordon MacKenzie...

Can An MBA Change Lives? This Stanford AND Harvard Grad Thinks So...

Investing in a business education is a major undertaking, and applicants focus a lot of attention on the immediate return that a place in a top business school will achieve. Whether in the data provided by schools on the latest graduating class, or in media rankings such as Forbes and the FT, emphasis is on the financial return on investment – post-MBA salary, securing a position at McKinsey, Google or Goldman, etc. But an MBA can provide a lifelong return that goes far beyond the initial career success you might enjoy. You have a business skill set that helps you perform to the highest level, a network of talented high-achievers to support your future ambitions, and friendships that can last a lifetime. Studying at Harvard Business School or Stanford GSB is the dream of many young professionals, but there are a small handful of individuals that study at Harvard and Stanford. That is the case for Heriberto Diarte, who graduated with a Stanford MBA in 1998, and then completed the Harvard Kennedy Masters in Public Administration (MPA) a year later. He sat in on a number of classes at HBS during his time in Boston, providing him with the rare opportunity to compare the students, teaching styles and personalities of the schools. In this interview, Heriberto talks about how his Stanford and Harvard experiences have accompanied his international career path, and continue to provide a return on his investment fifteen years later, as his latest venture hereO brings a GPS Watch tracking device for young children to market. Matt Symonds: Did your business education prove to be a good investment? Heriberto Diarte: The irony is that I did not maximize my post-MBA compensation nor position. I graduated from Stanford...

Elite MBA Students Are Spurning McKinsey, Bain For Freelance Consulting Sites...

An MBA job at McKinsey & Co or BCG was once the pinnacle for MBA students. But for graduates of elite schools like Harvard, Stanford or Wharton, freelance consulting is increasing alluring. As the rise of so-called unicorn companies like Uber or Airbnb — valued above a billion dollars — has spurred the “gig economy”, for a growing number of MBAs, the flexibility of short-term projects trumps the prestige of Bain & Co, et al. Harvard MBA Marta Mussacaleca worked at McKinsey and BCG before business school, but turned to HourlyNerd, a freelance consultancy site, to earn cash during the two-year degree. Some projects were more enjoyable than at established firms. “They have pushed me to become more adventurous,” she says. “Not having an evaluation committee scrutinizing your every move frees up creativity. I basically get to be my own consulting firm and am exposed to every single element in the process.”…Read full story:...

These were the highest paid MBAs in 2015

One MBA graduate last year struck gold to the tune of a $467,000 payday. Others, meanwhile, had a much harder time establishing financial footing. Those figures are according to a Poets & Quants report compiling the highest and lowest base salaries of 2015 MBA graduates, based on business school employment records. The highest reported MBA starting compensation came in at a whopping $467,000, more than 50 percent higher than the next highest base salary last year. The sum went to a private equity employee who graduated from Columbia Business School, whose graduates last year saw a median salary of $125,000. Another Columbia graduate took a $320,000 per year starting salary in consumer products. Meanwhile, a Stanford MBA saw the lowest reported compensation. The graduate had a base salary of $18,000 at a non-profit organization in Europe, according to Poets & Quants. Last year’s Stanford graduates working in non-profits enjoyed median starting salaries of $100,000. The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, meanwhile, reported a graduate with a low compensation of $24,000. Stanford MBA graduates earning the highest salaries were most commonly employed in hedge funds, private equity, health care, investment management, and venture capital, according to the report. On the opposite side of the spectrum, “social impact” industries, like non-profits and government work, were the most common industries among the lowest reported salaries. Though many schools reported these earning profiles, the numbers can be considered a conservative estimate due to the fact that schools attempt to protect the privacy of their graduates and prevent inflating applicants’ expectations.Read full story:...

Stanford to MBAs: Study now, start-up later

In an environment of billion-dollar valuations for private companies and cloud-based software that makes start-up launches easier than ever, staying focused on academics can be challenging. Should you hit the books, or try to launch the next, great start-up when the idea and capital strike? Over the last few years, as the economy has recovered, Garth Saloner, outgoing dean of Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business, has watched the number of MBA graduates who launch ventures (in founding roles) rise to 16 percent for the class of 2015, slightly lower than the all-time high of 18 percent of graduates reached two years ago. “We’ve never seen that before. It’s a big number,” Saloner said. A decade ago that figure was in the single digits. Of course, graduates launching start-ups is something to laud and a testament to Stanford’s competitive two-year MBA program that can open a lot of doors in Silicon Valley. U.S. News & World Report ranked Stanford University’s business school No. 1 for 2015, and edged out Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton. On the other hand, more ventures founded out of business school also suggests students are spending a huge bulk of time creating ventures. Aspiring entrepreneurs may not be taking full advantage of lessons from professors and visiting professionals during the business school program. “What gives me pause is when students get so engaged in the start-up itself in the second year that they devote their energy to it at the expense of their second year,” said Saloner in an interview earlier this month. “That’s a lost opportunity.” Read MoreWomen closing the gender gap for entrepreneurship By the way, it’s not like Stanford business school students are dropping out in droves for start-up...

Growing Scandal Threatens Stanford B-School Reputation...

Fallout from a reported love triangle at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business (GSB) has already claimed the school’s dean, sparked lawsuits and countersuits, and threatened the reputation of one of the nation’s most prestigious business schools. To make matters worse, it appears that Stanford is now dragging Apple into the fray. What happens next is anyone’s guess, but what’s allegedly happened so far would definitely make for a juicy TV mini-drama. According to reports, the 12-year marriage of GSB professors James Phills and Deborah Gruenfeld had been on the rocks for some time. In 2012, Gruenfeld finally decided to call it quits and moved out. That sparked a bitter divorce and custody battle that has cost the couple nearly half a million dollars. Three years later, it’s still ongoing. That’s not unusual, but soon after the separation, Gruenfeld reportedly began a clandestine affair with GSB dean Garth Saloner, who at the time happened to be both her and her husband’s boss. And wouldn’t you know it, Stanford ended up firing Gruenfeld’s estranged husband, ostensibly for taking several leaves of absence to teach at Apple University. While Saloner disclosed the incestuous relationship to Stanford provost John Etchemendy and publicly claims to have recused himself from the termination decision, Phills retained access to his wife’s emails and text messages, including “private” conversations with her new boyfriend, who seemed to be very much involved. So Phills sued the school and the dean for wrongful termination, alleging the usual litany of hostile workplace, ongoing retaliation and harassment. In addition, he believes that GSB is trying to force him out of his residence by recalling a low-interest rate loan, now that his wife is no longer living in the home they built on campus....

The Top Business Schools for Networking

Online graduate school guide graduateprograms.com has published its list of the top 25 business schools for networking. Over 13,000 business school students and alumni were surveyed and asked to rank their schools’ network quality on a scale of one to 10. Networking is amongst the foremost components of professional life. For MBAs, a business school is a networking nirvana; a melting pot of aspiring business leaders, experts and entrepreneurs providing an endless pool of potential partners, colleagues, employers and employees. Stanford GSB took first position with a network quality of 9.90. Columbia and Harvard made up the top three. INSEAD came close behind in fourth position with 9.75; its Fontainebleau campus the chief networking hub in Europe. With the rankings dominated by US schools, INSEAD along with London Business School in ninth fly the flag for Europe. Making up the rest of the top ten are Texas A&M University and Chicago’s Booth School in joint fifth; the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in seventh; the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School in eighth; and Cornell University: Johnson in tenth. Exposure to a strong network of business professionals is crucial for an MBA’s future career development. MBA applicants choosing and comparing business schools will always have networking opportunities at the forefront of their minds. The top business schools for networking boast an impressive array of high-level alumni. Stanford’s influential MBA alumni include the CEO of eBay, John Donahoe, and the chief executive of General Motors, Mary Barra. Harvard yields an impressive amount of top CEOs including the CEO of JPMorgan Chase, Jamie Dimon, and the CEO of General Electric, Jeffrey Immelt. INSEAD is also a breeding ground for successful professionals, including the CEO of Lloyds Banking Group, Antonio Horta-Osorio,...

How the Harvard MBA Compares To The Stanford MBA...

For the last three years, Harvard Business School (HBS) and Stanford Graduate School of Business (GBS) have led the Financial Times’ ranking of the world’s best master of business administration (MBA) programs. Stanford came in first in 2012, and Harvard topped the list in 2013 and 2014. In this year’s ranking, Harvard is still first, but Stanford is in fourth place after London Business School and University of Pennsylvania: Wharton. According to the Times Higher Education, the ranking “is based on a number of different factors including gender diversity and the international spread of students, but the heaviest weighting is placed on alumni salaries.” Based on the 2015 FT ranking, alumni from HBS and GBS have the highest salaries with $179,910 and $177,089, respectively—and they had the highest salaries in previous years as well. So what are the advantages and disadvantages of each program, and how do Harvard and Stanford compare? “TO EDUCATE LEADERS THAT MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE WORLD” “To educate leaders that make a difference in the world,” is the mission of the HBS MBA program. Harvard’s MBA program was founded in 1908 as the first program of its kind. The MBA takes two years: the goal of the first year courses is to provide students with a foundation in “broad-based fundamentals.” During the second year, students can choose from over 90 courses in ten different categories. HBS emphasizes its “focus on real-world practice […] using the case method, which puts students into the role of decision makers every day.” Today, there are more than 76,000 HBS alumni living in 167 countries with nearly 50 percent of alumni working in general management, 23.4 percent in finance and 23 percent in professional services. Famous HBS alumni include...

Stanford Bets Big on Virtual Education

Stanford’s Graduate School of Business took its relationship with online education to the next level on Wednesday, when it announced that a new program for company executives will be delivered entirely by way of the Internet. “I don’t know of anything else like this,” says Audrey Witters, managing director of online executive education at Stanford GSB. “We’ve put together something for a very targeted audience, people who are trying to be corporate innovators, with courses where they all work together. That’s a lot different from taking a MOOC [massive open online course].” Stanford said it will admit up to 100 people to the LEAD Certificate program, which will begin in May 2015 and deliver the “intimate and academically rigorous on-campus Stanford experience” to students from the comfort of their computer screens. In an effort to make students “really feel connected to each other, to Stanford, and to the faculty,” the eight-course program will encourage students to interact through message boards, online chats, Google Hangouts, and phone calls over the course of its yearlong duration, Witters says. “We really want to create the high-engagement, community aspect that everyone who comes to Stanford’s campus feels,” she says. STORY: Steve Ballmer Goes to College: On Campus With Stanford’s New Professor The classes will be offered on a platform supplied by Novoed, a virtual education company started by former Stanford professor Amin Saberi and Stanford Ph.D. student Farnaz Ronaghi. The B-school has invested a significant chunk of its resources in launching the program: About 10 to 15 faculty members are slated to teach the courses. In addition to building a studio where it will film course videos, the school has hired a growing pool of educational technology experts and motion graphic designers to...

Stanford Now Offering a Dual-Degree MBA/MA in International Policy Studies...

Stanford Graduate School of Business has announced that it has launched a new dual-degree program, where students can study for an MBA and a MA in International Policy Studies simultaneously. By pursuing both degrees as the same time, students can complete the dual-degree program in three years, rather than the four it would take typically. The new program caters to students who want to work in fields that bridge government and business, both in the U.S. and internationally. “The cross-disciplinary courses will prepare students for leadership roles in international organizations, nonprofit organizations, social enterprises, consulting firms, and corporations that focus on a range of issues such as international development, trade and finance, security, healthcare, and the environment,” according to a statement from the school. Students who are interested in the program must separately apply to and be accepted by both the MBA program and the MA program. The MA in International Management is offered through Stanford’s School of Humanities and Sciences. During the first year, students will take MBA courses exclusively. The second year will consist of a mix of business and policy courses, while the third year will be made up of elective courses and a practicum for the international studies program. Students at Stanford have the opportunity to pair their MBA with a number of other programs, including an MS in Environment and Resources, a JD, and an MS in Computer Science, among others. According to Stanford, around one in six MBA students pursue dual-degree options.Read full story: FIND...

Steve Ballmer Goes to College: On Campus With Stanford’s New Professor...

The public knows only one version of Steve Ballmer: the blustery salesman, sweating and booming away and trying to rally Microsoft (MSFT) employees or win over investors. It’s not our fault that we think of Ballmer in this way; it’s his. He put on so many of these performances that he turned into a caricature. Yet, when you hear Ballmer reflect on his cheerleader persona, you know the public image of the man is incomplete. “What’s the old existentialist saying?” he asks me while we talk in a small office at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. “A man is the sum total of his actions. Even back through high school, when we first started to study this, I began to really believe it. This wasn’t ‘I think therefore I am,’ like the Cartesians. You’re accountable for what you do. You’re not accountable for what you thought. You’re not accountable for what you recommended. You’re accountable for what you actually got done.” “So, you know,” Ballmer continued, “would I do some of those things, if I could, back? Would I run around quite as silly as I used to? Probably not. Some of that is age. But I’m not embarrassed by it. I stand up and say, ‘Hey, it was part of what was important.’ It’s the way I felt. It’s part of what was important for my job. No, I stand behind it.” STORY: Steve Ballmer’s New Life With the Clippers The truth is that Ballmer is a thoughtful man who operates not in one mode but four or five modes. Most of us oscillate among different flavors of our personalities, depending on the situation. Ballmer, I think, has more extreme shifts. There’s the bombastic guy everyone knows:...