Articles that mention Chicago Booth

Glassdoor for MBAs and Startups

One of the big issues with employment review websites, such as Glassdoor, is that feedback is usually submitted only by those who had a really great, or really bad, experience at a company. And feedback is so general, it doesn’t offer an accurate snapshot for people with diverse backgrounds: A business school student fresh out of undergrad sees the same salary range as someone with an MBA, for example. Smaller companies and startups without many employees, aren’t as well represented as major corporations. University of Chicago Booth startup TransparenC is hoping to change that with curated career sites. They’re starting with a website tailored to MBA students, called TransparentMBA, but they anticipate expanding their platform to law, engineering, and tech among other niche job seekers not served by general career sites like Glassdoor and Linkedin. The idea first came to Mitch Kirby, a UChicago Booth student, last fall when attempting to look for jobs post-graduation. Glassdoor felt like “information overload” he said, and most of the aggregate information didn’t give him an idea of how his qualification–an MBA from a top-ranked business school–would translate to a position or compensation. So he decided to create a platform that gave more granular information on companies and careers for MBA students (he coded it himself), and see if his classmates were interested. They were: about 50 percent of Booth students quickly signed up, he said. Profiles for companies, jobs, and industries are built through feedback that users provide, which they’re required to submit when signing up for the platform. Users can see feedback such as expected compensation, satisfaction rates, and culture fit for an MBA at a given company and position. They can also compare the experiences at the industry level. Kirby...

Where to go to business school if you want the highest salary...

There’s more to choosing a business school than its name. Unless your primary goal is to make as much money as possible. Unlike undergraduate programs, where the schools producing the highest earners are often relatively unknown, the graduate schools with the highest-earning MBA grads are usually the ones with the biggest name recognition. When ranked by median mid-career pay, the top schools are Stanford, Harvard Business School, the University of Pennsylvania and the University of California- Berkeley, according to a report released Wednesday by PayScale.com. When schools are ranked instead by early career pay, the order changes a bit but the same schools dominate the top of the list. Two schools — the University of Chicago and the University of Texas at Austin — crack the top 10, displacing Harvard and Columbia, which have higher earnings for mid-career graduates. The strong correlation between brand recognition and pay doesn’t hold true for all graduate programs, says Katie Bardaro, director of analytics for Payscale.com. For most students, the degree and job earned will have a bigger effect on earnings than the school attended. (Consider, a public school teacher who graduated from Harvard likely won’t make much more than one who graduated from a public university.) For instance, fewer colleges and universities will offer certain technical or scientific degrees. And often, lesser known state or public schools may end up being among the best known within a particular industry, such as engineering or physics, if they have large research grants that allow for more ambitious projects, Bardaro says. MBA programs are much more commonly found on campuses across the country, she says, “so one of the things that makes people stand out is if they got their degree from this top tier...