Articles from MBA-Channel

Today’s MBA candidates have a clearer vision for the future...

Business school applicants consider applying to fewer programmes and are more focused on a particular postgraduate career path according to a new study by the Graduate Management Admission Council (GMAC). The 2016 mba.com Prospective Students Survey Report was conducted amongst 10,000 individuals worldwide. The survey showed that on average, prospective students considered 2.8 programme types in 2015, down from 3.1 in 2014. For their postgraduate careers, 71 per cent of those surveyed cited a single industry of interest, compared with 58 per cent in 2014. In addition, 61 per cent of prospective students cited a single job function of interest, compared with 46 per cent in 2014. According to GMAC the current status of the economy might play a role in this phenomenon as prospective students may perceive it to be easier to go after their “dream job” in this market compared with the post-recession years. The other interesting outcome of the survey was that students seem to show greater interest in specialised business master’s programmes. One-fourth (23 per cent) are considering only specialised business master’s programmes, such as Master of Accounting or Master of Finance, which represents an increase since 2009, when just 15 per cent of candidates were considering only specialized master’s programmes. Slightly more than a quarter, or 28 per cent, are considering both MBA and specialised business master’s programmes whereas 50 per cent of prospective students are still only going for MBA programmes. In Western Europe, however, the pipeline has notably shifted toward specialised (pre-experience) business master’s programmes, especially within the past seven years. In 2009, 49 per cent of prospective students were considering only MBA programmes and 22 per cent were considering only specialised business master’s programmes. In 2015, the tables have turned with...

Why an MBA may not be enough to get you the banking job you desire...

Before the financial crisis, investment banks were some of the biggest recruiters of MBAs. I was one of the people recruiting MBAs on their behalf, writes Derek Walker, an independent careers consultant, a former director of campus recruitment at Barclays, and a former director of staffing for the investment bank Merrill Lynch. In 2008, Lehman Brothers’ many investment banks were amongst the top hirers of MBAs globally. Eight years on, and the picture is very different. Now consultancies have taken over as main employers. London Business School’s most recent MBA employment report for 2014 shows that the biggest hirers of its MBAs were McKinsey & Co, the Boston Consulting Group, Bain & Co and A.T. Kearney. Collectively, these firms hired 71 students. By comparison, the biggest banking hirers (Citi, Bank of America, Merrill Lynch, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley and Nomura) hired as few as 25 people. Ten years ago, banks often hired MBA associates into IBD – that means M&A and corporate finance roles – and also into sales and trading, equity research, private banking and wealth management. Now, most MBAs are mainly hired into IBD. Trading floors rather focus on students from financial masters programmes and undergrads. If you think you have a strong academic and professional background and still want to go into banking, Walker suggests a number of areas where to put the focus of an application: Demonstrate some understanding of financial modelling. If you aspire to work in banking after the course is over, you really need to attend some extra-curricular or online modelling classes while you’re studying. You need to know about the firm and the deals they’ve been doing – and be able to discuss market reaction to the aspects of the firm’s...

MBA programmes that yield the best salaries

One major component of Business Insider’s ranking is the average starting salary. Looking at this exclusively, you can filter out the business schools that yield the best salaries after graduation. Among the 50 leading schools, students from 22 schools went on achieving base salaries over 100,000 US-Dollar. Although Stanford placed fourth on the overall list, its graduates earn the highest starting salaries of all the schools, averaging more than 133,000 US-Dollar. Other high achievers like Harvard and Wharton fared well as well. Harvard graduates earn an average of more than 131,000 US-Dollar after school and Wharton graduates average on more than 127,000 US-Dollar, though Wharton’s tuition cost also amounts to 144,340 US-Dollar. The Wharton School topped the Business Insider ranking overall in 2015 for all-around excellence (see article above). Wharton’s salary expectation is similar to Columbia Business School’s as well as Sloan School of Management’s and the Booth School of Business’s. Graduates of Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business follow with an average starting salary of 123,900 US-Dollar. Amongst the 22 schools are many more well-known schools like the Anderson School of Management, the Fuqua School of Business, Yale School of Management, London Business School, Darden Business School, the Booth School of Business or the Kellogg School of Management. But other not as well-known universities do well in the salary category as well. Graduates from the Foster School of Business, the Jones Graduate School of Business or the McCombs School of Business also break the ranks of the 100,000 US-Dollarfor example. Read full story: MBA...