Glassdoor for MBAs and Startups

One of the big issues with employment review websites, such as Glassdoor, is that feedback is usually submitted only by those who had a really great, or really bad, experience at a company. And feedback is so general, it doesn’t offer an accurate snapshot for people with diverse backgrounds: A business school student fresh out of undergrad sees the same salary range as someone with an MBA, for example. Smaller companies and startups without many employees, aren’t as well represented as major corporations. University of Chicago Booth startup TransparenC is hoping to change that with curated career sites. They’re starting with a website tailored to MBA students, called TransparentMBA, but they anticipate expanding their platform to law, engineering, and tech among other niche job seekers not served by general career sites like Glassdoor and Linkedin. The idea first came to Mitch Kirby, a UChicago Booth student, last fall when attempting to look for jobs post-graduation. Glassdoor felt like “information overload” he said, and most of the aggregate information didn’t give him an idea of how his qualification–an MBA from a top-ranked business school–would translate to a position or compensation. So he decided to create a platform that gave more granular information on companies and careers for MBA students (he coded it himself), and see if his classmates were interested. They were: about 50 percent of Booth students quickly signed up, he said. Profiles for companies, jobs, and industries are built through feedback that users provide, which they’re required to submit when signing up for the platform. Users can see feedback such as expected compensation, satisfaction rates, and culture fit for an MBA at a given company and position. They can also compare the experiences at the industry level. Kirby...

These 6 Sloan Startups Are so MIT

When it comes to ground-breaking scientific discoveries and technological developments, MIT kills it. But the accolades in those areas sometimes might overshadow the fact that the Institute fosters stellar businesses, as well. Sloan is a big name among business schools, and its students have launched many a startup that are just so MIT. Let’s celebrate these Sloan startups: Here’s a list of some of the most interesting startups from the B school – both current student ventures, along with spin-outs. Insurify This Sloan spin-out is taking car insurance into the 21st Century. Insurify has already made waves with its auto insurance shopping platform, which includes a virtual insurance agent – Evia – who’s there to help. The venture secured $2 million in seed funding in January, so it’s off to a steady start. GoodSIRS The recent winner of MIT Sloan’s Healthcare Innovation Prize, GoodSIRS is trying to save millions of lives each year with its filtration treatment for sepsis. The common, fatal condition occurs when people’s bodies go into overdrive trying to fight an infection, causing organ failure. With GoodSIRS’ selective filtration technology, we’ll be able to remove the offending chemicals from the bloodstream and prevent deaths from sepsis. Gomango Here in the U.S., we walk into a grocery store, peruse the produce section and think nothing of it. In developing nations where refrigeration is lacking, a significant portion of food spoils before it makes it to market. Gomango is creating a network of rental cooling boxes in India that would let farmers prevent food spoilage, sell more at markets and even transport their products to areas further away to be more lucrative. EarID We love talking about what’s good and not good for your health, yet we know...

63 MBA Grads Raised $15bn In Venture Capital For Their $65bn ‘Unicorn’ startups...

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Here Are Poets&Quants Top MBA Startups

Do you need an MBA to do a successful startup? Of course not. But when it comes to using an MBA experience to launch a company, you won’t get much of an argument from the business school graduates whose companies have landed on Poets&Quants’ third annual ranking of the Top 100 MBA Startups. For the first time since the rankings were created, the top spot goes to a venture that had not already been sold. SoFi, a Stanford-founded student loan refinancing company, charged to the top of this year’s list with a monstrous $1.4 billion raised for operations in the past five years. Their leap up the rankings was anchored by a $1 billion Series E round announced last September. Next was GrabTaxi, the Southeastern Asia taxi booking app founded by a team from Harvard, with $680 million in venture backing. Rounding out the top three was Stanford-founded RelateIQ, which was acquired by Salesforce for $390 million and is now SalesforceIQ. Cultural Moment or Frothy VC Market? While SoFi and Grabtaxi certainly set the pace in the race for later series funding, they were not the only two startups to make big moves this year. Harvard-founded Oscar Insurance zoomed from $150 million and ninth place last year to $327.5 million and fourth place this year. Wharton-founded razor venture, Harry’s, nudged up one spot to fifth this year, with $287 million in total funding. And PillPack, founded by an MIT Sloan School of Management team, catapulted from 70th to 13th, with total backing of $62.8 million. Whether they’re enjoying a cultural moment or a frothy venture capital market, startup fever on business school campuses has never been hotter. Last year, 84 out of the 908 graduating MBAs from Harvard launched...