How many Indian CEOs have an MBA?

Does one need to have an MBA to ascend to the top of Indian companies? Not necessarily, but it helps. A Mint analysis shows that 144 of the CEOs of BSE 500 companies, India’s largest listed firms that make up 90% of its market capitalisation, have an MBA. Details were available for only 466 companies. Here, the term MBA is used loosely, to also include the much sought after post graduate diploma in business management or PGDBM that is awarded by the Indian Institutes of Management or IIMs. No other educational qualification comes close. Interestingly 81 of the CEOs are engineers but it is likely that many of the 144 CEOs with MBAs are engineer-MBAs. The Indian Institute of Technology and Indian Institute of Management Combination was and is a popular one. Still, there are 322 companies whose CEOs are not MBAs and it is evident that a B-school background may not be necessary to rise to the top — even in the case of professional managers. Here are five charts on the educational background of India’s top CEOs…Read full story:...

42% Of CEOs At Top Fortune 100 Firms Have MBA Degrees...

Business school may be your ticket to the boardroom. More than 40% of the chief executive officers in the top 100 Fortune companies have studied for an MBA, according to research from Heidrick & Struggles, the executive search firm. In the UK, 27% of the top chief executives opted for an MBA degree; 24% in France. The data show that studying at an elite business school could be your best bet for becoming a CEO. Around 50% of the chief executives of SBF 120 companies, the index of France’s 120 largest firms, graduated from one of four top schools: INSEAD, HEC Paris, École nationale d’administration or École Polytechnique. INSEAD, which has campuses in France, Singapore and Abu Dhabi, has several prominent CEOs. These include Tidjane Thiam at Swiss investment bank Credit Suisse; Helge Lund of oil major BG Group; and António Horta-Osório of UK lender Lloyds Banking Group. HEC Paris’ star alumni include Jean-Paul Agon, CEO of cosmetics group L’Oréal; François-Henri Pinault, the chief executive of luxury brand Kering; and Bruno Lafont, industrial champion Lafarge’s chief. In the US, 28% of the Fortune 100 chiefs graduated from seven top universities: Harvard, Stanford, Pennsylvania, Berkeley, Columbia, MIT, and Princeton. Harvard Business School has seven CEOs at top European companies alone. These include Vittorio Colao at telecoms group Vodafone, and Sir Martin Sorrell of WPP, the world’s largest advertising group. Columbia’s CEO alumni are James Gorman, at US bank Morgan Stanley, and César Alierta, at telecoms group Telefónica, among others. Stanford counts Carlos Brito, CEO of brewer Anheuser-Busch InBev, as alumni. Berkeley graduated Joseph Jimenez, the chief of pharma group Novartis, and Shantanu Narayen, head at software company Adobe. Meanwhile, 24% of the UK’s FTSE 100 CEOs graduated from either Oxford...

Does an MBA Matter to Shareholders?

Most of the top business leaders in the world do not have MBAs, according to a report released Tuesday, Oct. 14, by the Harvard Business Review. The magazine ranked chief executives on how much return their company’s shareholders earned on their investment and how much the CEOs increased their companies’ market values during their tenure. Just 29 of the 100 best performers had MBAs, and fewer than half of the executives with MBAs got their degree from the most elite business schools. Thirteen of the 29 have MBAs from the 10 programs ranked highest by Bloomberg Businessweek. Harvard Business School produced seven of the highest-performing CEOs on the list, the most of any MBA program. The findings suggest that becoming the most valuable CEO, from the perspective of shareholders, might have less to do with whether or not you have an MBA and more to do with having the smarts and skills to lead a company. Almost a quarter of CEOs on the list—24 of 100—had engineering degrees. (Eight had both MBAs and engineering degrees.) Why did engineers do so well, even when they led such nontech companies as brewing giant Anheuser-Busch InBev (ABI:BB) or insurance company Sampo (SAMAS:FH)? “Studying engineering gives someone a practical, pragmatic orientation,” Nitin Nohria, dean of Harvard Business School, said in the report. “It makes you think about costs vs. performance. These are principles that can be deeply important when you think about organizations.” To Nohria’s point, the executive who topped the list, Amazon.com (AMZN) CEO Jeff Bezos, has an engineering degree and no MBA. The full ranking is on the Harvard Business Review’s website. Below is a list of the executives with business degrees, along with their overall rank. 2. John Martin, Gilead...