Articles from Yahoo Finance

20 interview questions Harvard asks MBA candidates...

Being among the small percentage of applicants admitted to the No. 1 business school in the world immediately puts you in some seriously good company. Of the nearly 10,000 applicants to Harvard Business School’s class of 2017, only 11% were admitted. What made them stand out? As with any interview or exam, preparation is key. And when applying to Harvard, it’s vital. Stacy Blackman, founder of Stacy Blackman Consulting, helps clients earn admission to top MBA programs. She has an undergraduate degree from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and an MBA from the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University. Over the past decade, Blackman has studied successful Harvard interview transcripts. She put together an interview guide featuring sample questions, which are broken into three categories: past experiences, present attributes, and future goals. We’ve selected interview questions in each category from Blackman’s Harvard interview guide. Past experiences Your past experiences can tell a lot about how you’ve dealt with success and failure. When interviewing with Harvard, “expect to be asked a number of questions that will help interviewers gauge how life has tested you and how you responded to that test,” Blackman writes. Sample questions include: Why did you choose to work for your current company? Many people go straight from investment banking to a private equity firm. Why do you feel you need the MBA in between? Describe a situation where you successfully responded to change. Describe a time when you helped someone at work. Describe a mistake you’ve made within the past three years. Describe your greatest accomplishment. How would you describe your style for teaching peers? Tell me about a time you failed. The interviewer wants to know the rationale behind all...

Is business school worth it?

It’s a fair enough question considering the average cost of one year at a top-ten MBA program is currently $58,554 in the U.S., not including opportunity cost (lost income). Taking two years off from the professional world during the height of working years is a scary proposition to say the least. As the peak of the recession fades from view and more jobs become available, less people in the U.S. seem to be ready to take on that risk. Applications to business school have dropped off significantly with elite institutions like The Wharton School at University of Pennsylvania seeing a 12% decrease over four years (as of 2013). It’s not only Wharton feeling the pinch as applicants dry up. Schools like Harvard are lowering their application barriers to attract more potential students. In order to gain admission to the fabled program one decade ago a prospective MBA had to complete eight essays, today there is one and it’s optional. Columbia Business School is asking its applicants to sum up their career goals in just 75 characters. Wharton Dean Geoffrey Garrett says that focusing on the number of applicants isn’t the right way to fix business school in the U.S. It’s about offering students more. He compares business school to the retail industry. Sure there’s a lot of competition online but if a store offers a “richer, better and deeper” experience it still does well. Garrett believes that the pressure is good for the current business school model. “It forces us to focus on the real value add of an on-campus degree,” he says. “It can’t just be the credential and the stamp.”..Read full story: Yahoo Finance...