Articles that mention Wharton

Elite MBA Students Are Spurning McKinsey, Bain For Freelance Consulting Sites...

An MBA job at McKinsey & Co or BCG was once the pinnacle for MBA students. But for graduates of elite schools like Harvard, Stanford or Wharton, freelance consulting is increasing alluring. As the rise of so-called unicorn companies like Uber or Airbnb — valued above a billion dollars — has spurred the “gig economy”, for a growing number of MBAs, the flexibility of short-term projects trumps the prestige of Bain & Co, et al. Harvard MBA Marta Mussacaleca worked at McKinsey and BCG before business school, but turned to HourlyNerd, a freelance consultancy site, to earn cash during the two-year degree. Some projects were more enjoyable than at established firms. “They have pushed me to become more adventurous,” she says. “Not having an evaluation committee scrutinizing your every move frees up creativity. I basically get to be my own consulting firm and am exposed to every single element in the process.”…Read full story:...

These were the highest paid MBAs in 2015

One MBA graduate last year struck gold to the tune of a $467,000 payday. Others, meanwhile, had a much harder time establishing financial footing. Those figures are according to a Poets & Quants report compiling the highest and lowest base salaries of 2015 MBA graduates, based on business school employment records. The highest reported MBA starting compensation came in at a whopping $467,000, more than 50 percent higher than the next highest base salary last year. The sum went to a private equity employee who graduated from Columbia Business School, whose graduates last year saw a median salary of $125,000. Another Columbia graduate took a $320,000 per year starting salary in consumer products. Meanwhile, a Stanford MBA saw the lowest reported compensation. The graduate had a base salary of $18,000 at a non-profit organization in Europe, according to Poets & Quants. Last year’s Stanford graduates working in non-profits enjoyed median starting salaries of $100,000. The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, meanwhile, reported a graduate with a low compensation of $24,000. Stanford MBA graduates earning the highest salaries were most commonly employed in hedge funds, private equity, health care, investment management, and venture capital, according to the report. On the opposite side of the spectrum, “social impact” industries, like non-profits and government work, were the most common industries among the lowest reported salaries. Though many schools reported these earning profiles, the numbers can be considered a conservative estimate due to the fact that schools attempt to protect the privacy of their graduates and prevent inflating applicants’ expectations.Read full story:...

4 characteristics Wharton looks for in top MBA candidates...

Every MBA program has a personality — and some candidates are a better fit for certain schools than for others. The University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School is no exception. After more than 15 years of helping our clients receive highly coveted admissions letters to Wharton, we’ve pulled together some key characteristics that, together, paint a unique picture of what Wharton is looking for in MBA students. Before we launch into the list, one caveat: Knowing what a particular business school is looking for isn’t an opportunity to re-make yourself into what you think their “ideal” student would be. Rather, it’s a chance to find a learning community that values your strengths and where you can make a positive contribution with the unique skills, experiences, and perspectives you bring to the table. If you have your sights set on Wharton, here are a few qualities that successful MBA candidates often have in common. If your values and Wharton’s line up, Wharton might be a great fit for you — and you might be a great fit for their world-renowned MBA program. Here are four characteristics that Wharton looks for in MBA candidates: 1. An innovative mindset “Innovation” is such a buzzword today that it’s commonly used to describe almost everything. But at Wharton, the willingness to take an innovative approach is something they not only look for in prospective MBA candidates — it’s also a standard they hold themselves to, starting with their MBA admissions process. For example, Wharton was one of the first business schools in the US to pioneer a new team-based conversation as part of the interview process, to gauge how candidates express their ideas and relate to others in a conversation that mirrors those they’d have...

3 tips for acing a Wharton MBA interview

Every year, top business schools receive thousands of applications for admission, but they only admit an average of 25% of those who apply. The story is no different at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School, where approximately half of all applicants are interviewed, but less than one in 10 are ultimately granted admission — and no student is admitted without an interview. As a consultant who helps clients earn admission to top MBA programs, I know first-hand how important interviews are. They’re a key component of how the admissions committee gets a full picture of you as an applicant, and evaluates whether you’ll fit into the Wharton community. Here are three tips for ensuring your Wharton interview strategy shows your assets and skills off to their best advantage: 1. Be prepared for the team-based discussion. Wharton was among the first business schools in the US to implement a team-based discussion component as part of the interview process, in which five to six applicants discuss a topic while being observed by admissions committee members. This new aspect of the application is designed to get a sense of who you are outside of a well-written essay or even a well-rehearsed interview. Wharton is looking for team players and people who can be analytical while working well with others. Keep in mind that observers want to see candidates contributing without dominating the discussion; the idea is to see how you might engage in a productive conversation with a group of future classmates. To make a positive impression, be sure to share your point of view, but also listen thoughtfully; respect differing points of view; and bring others into the conversation. 2. Emphasize your experience as an innovator. Innovation is integral to Wharton’s...

13 Tips From MBA Students On How To Succeed In A Top-Tier Program...

MBA students spend months if not years working to get into an MBA program. However, once they are in a program, the everyday demands take over and students have little time to think about how to get the most out of their program. To better understand how to hit the ground running and to make sure you maximize success in your MBA program, we turned to recent and current students of top-tier MBA programs for advice. Tip #1: Focus on Career Experimentation Alex Haddock, Darden School of Business (University of Virginia), Interned at Goldman Sachs Alex Haddock, a rising Second Year at Darden, suggests that you go beyond the career exploration offered through recruiting. During the recruiting process, you will have access to top companies that will try to give you a sense of what it’s like to work in different fields and functions. However, business school offers many other opportunities to learn about new roles and industries – and the chance to actually use and experiment with the skills required in a variety of roles. Classes, clubs and extracurricular experiences will let you engage in real consulting, marketing and entrepreneurial engagements, just to name a few. During his first year, Alex was able to help a local company organize its accounting records, work with a public school to streamline its planning processes, and compete in a start-up pitch competition. If you take advantage of the resources at your school, you can leave after two years already having lived the roles of marketer, banker, consultant and more. Then you can make the best decision about your career path and your future. Tip #2: Make the Most of the MBA “Card” David Newsome, Sloan School of Management (Massachusetts Institute of...

What B-school rejection feels like: When Harvard, Wharton, Kellogg, Tuck, and Yale all say no...

It was as if he’d climbed up on a high diving board, shouted down to everyone on the pool deck to watch him perform a triple back flip with four twists, bounced a few times to prepare for launch, bounced a few more times to make sure everyone was looking, propelled himself into the air … and missed the pool completely. Splat. Poor Grant. He wasn’t attempting the world’s most difficult dive, but its academic equivalent instead: applying to an ultra-elite MBA program. And while he wasn’t wearing a Speedo on a high board over a pool, he was even more exposed—Grant was standing in the middle of the Internet for all to see. You may have read his blog, Grant Me Admission, in which he chronicles his quest for a top-tier MBA. It’s received nearly 100,000 page views. And it’s pretty good: enthusiastic, lively, clearly written, full of tips and ideas and lessons learned. Read it, and you’re right there with Grant as he studies for and takes the GMAT, researches schools, visits campuses, analyzes sample essays, and gets interviews. It’s incredibly detailed. Which is part of the reason Grant went splat. He wasn’t just applying to top B-schools. He was also working full time, and doing a lot of nonprofit work, plus putting in hours and hours on his blog. His story holds a valuable lesson for anyone applying to top MBA programs. Grant failed to focus on Goal No. 1, getting admitted to business school, and he paid a painful price. As he writes on a recent post, below a photo of a bleak Martian landscape: Harvard: Dinged without an interview Wharton: Dinged without an interview Yale: Dinged without an interview Kellogg: Dinged Tuck: Dinged I’m...

Wharton MBA Applications Rise

The University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School posted a 1.2% increase in applications to its M.B.A. program this year, a bright spot of admissions news after some years of declines. The profile for the class that started this fall and will graduate in 2016, published online, reported that 6,111 people applied for admission to the full-time M.B.A. program, compared with 6,036 for the fall 2013 entering class. The application figures are still far below those the school saw in the wake of the financial crisis, when young professionals flocked to business schools to boost their credentials in a brutal job market. In 2010, Wharton reported receiving 6,819 applications. Some other schools also reported brief declines in the years since the downturn, as prospective students shied away from debt and rethought their career plans as Wall Street opportunities disappeared; Wharton, long a training ground for finance elites, was particularly hard hit. Yet Wharton’s admissions team has said it places more focus on applicant quality than on quantity. In recent years, its students are becoming a more high-achieving group. The average GMAT score for enrolled students this fall was 728–on a scale of 200 to 800–up from 725 last year and 718 for the class that enrolled in fall 2012. Application volume has likewise gone up at other top-tier schools, including Harvard Business School (up 2.4%) and the New York University Stern School of Business (up 6.2%). Many institutions reported that their application growth was buoyed by interest from international candidates.Lea la noticia completa en Wall Street Journal...