What to Look for in Online MBA Faculty

When Audrey McLaughlin was looking into online MBA programs, the Cleveland, Ohio, native cared a lot about overall prestige and program rankings. But she also paid attention to something more granular: the instructors. “I wanted the same faculty as the residential program,” says McLaughlin, who ended up enrolling in Indiana University’s online MBA program in 2013. “I wanted access to the same classes that I could have in person.” Vetting online MBA faculty is key, experts say, since instructors not only shape a student’s academic experience, but can also serve as helpful connections down the road. As a result, they suggest students follow in McLaughlin’s footsteps and research instructors, as well as the overall structure of a program’s faculty. “There are all kinds of models out there, and these are things that students should be aware of,” says David Sylvia, director of academic affairs for graduate programs at Pennsylvania State University—World Campus. One marker of a reputable online MBA program is shared faculty with the residential division, says Phil Powell, faculty chair of the online business programs at Indiana University. If an online MBA program outsources instruction, it’s a sign that school officials aren’t prioritizing the educational experience as they should, he says. “It’s a very quick and dirty way to differentiate whether the online program is seen as a strategic asset for the school or whether it’s just a quick way to make a buck,” says Powell, whose program, ranked No. 1 among online graduate business programs, uses the same faculty as the on-campus program. “All schools see their residential MBA programs as a strategic asset.” McLaughlin, who now works in North Carolina as a business support consultant, says online students benefit from instructors who teach the same...

Two-year MBA programmes see applications rise for second year...

There is good news for the deans of US business schools, many of whom have spent the past few years worrying that part-time and online MBA programmes would replace the traditional residential format. According to the latest data from GMAC, distributors of the GMAT entry test for business school, demand is returning for the traditional two-year MBA degree. For the second year in a row, a majority of full-time, two-year MBA programmes reported rising or stable application volumes for GMAC’s annual Application Trends Survey. In 2014, 61 per cent of schools teaching two-year degrees reported an increase in applications, according to GMAC, up from 50 per cent of schools in 2013. “For schools, the rise over the last three years in two-year applications is welcome,” says Sangeet Chowfla, president of GMAC. “This echoes other research that tells us how highly students value their two-year MBA degrees for the personal, professional and financial advantages it conveys.” By comparison, 60 per cent of business schools teaching one-year MBA programmes have reported a decline in applications in 2014. However, it was largely good news for other business masters. Most specialised masters degrees – masters in management, accounting, marketing and so on – saw an increase in the number of applications in 2014. The big exception to this was Masters in Finance degrees, which saw a decline in the number of applicants for the second year in a row. The increased number of applications for two-year programmes is the second piece of good news for US business schools this year. In May, GMAT’s Corporate Recruiters Survey revealed that four out of five companies said they planned to hire MBA graduates in 2014. Read full story: Financial...

The Ultimate Guide To Applying To Business School...

If you’ve clicked on this article, you’ve probably decided it’s time to get serious about applying to business school. I won’t sugar coat it: The admissions process is hard and does take a fair amount of time. But you can definitely be successful and get into your dream school, as long as you take all of the right steps and plan out your time. I’ve written a lot on getting through this process, so I’ve gathered some of my best advice here into an ultimate guide to MBA admissions, walking you through everything from picking which schools to apply for to making your final decision once the acceptance letters start rolling in. 1. Take the GMAT Unfortunately, there’s no way around this one—the GMAT is required for nearly every program out there. Signing up for a test date is the only way I was able to push myself to study, so I’d recommend picking a date and going for it. Once you’ve signed up, follow my plan for picking a study strategy, actually making time to practice, and getting yourself to test day in the best shape possible. Depending on your background and your goal score, you can plan to study for roughly 8-10 weeks before the test. 2. Pick Your Schools Deciding where to apply to school can be a little tricky just because each program is pretty distinct. As I detailed in my article on the subject, definitely take the time to dig into the culture, curriculum, and career placement statistics for each school you consider so that you don’t have any surprises later on in the process. And if you can find the time and money, try to visit each campus you’re strongly considering—there’s really no...

Forget the MBA

When Luis Ochoa wanted to make the leap from investment banking analyst to corporate strategist, he didn’t follow the usual path of getting a master’s of business administration degree. Instead, the Stanford University graduate took a few free strategy and financial accounting classes on Coursera, one of the major providers of so-called MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses), which have grown in popularity globally over the past few years. “I gained a foundation with those courses that helped me transition into corporate strategy” at Oppenheimer Funds, the 29-year-old New Yorker said. “Now, I’m not interested in an MBA because I’m where I want to be.” Like Ochoa, a growing number of people are hoping MOOCs will be a ticket to a new job or promotion —without the cost and time required to secure a traditional university degree. The challenge is to increase employers’ awareness and appreciation of the value of online courses. “We still get questions from companies about how good MOOCs are, but we’re finding that businesses are more and more willing to consider them to help fill skill gaps,” said Sebastian Thrun, chief executive of the MOOC platform Udacity, based in Mountain View, California. “For some jobs, companies are looking for specific credentials that MOOCs can provide, and not necessarily a degree.” For some jobs, companies are looking for specific credentials that MOOCs can provide, and not necessarily a degree. — Sebastian Thrun A Bainbridge Strategy Consulting study of US human-resource professionals found that only about a third were aware of MOOCs, while about half of the managers and directors in a global survey by CarringtonCrisp said they are “uncertain of what a MOOC offers.” “There’s a generation gap between those doing recruiting and the younger people taking...

Is there a Jesuit B-school rankings conspiracy?...

Peculiar results in U.S. News’ specialty MBA rankings have led to speculation that Jesuit schools may be gaming the system, particularly since they are based solely on a survey of business school officials. (Poets&Quants) — Jesuit colleges are popping up in surprising places—that is, surprising places on the U.S. News & World Report MBA specialty rankings. Take Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, and its Erivan K. Haub School of Business. Haub, according to U.S. News, is 16th-best in America for marketing, beating out Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business and Cornell’s Johnson School of Management, both tied at No. 17. Yet Haub is nowhere to be found on the U.S. News’ ranking of the top 100 business schools, while Tuck ranks at No. 9 and Johnson is 17th on the list. Now consider Saint Louis University’s Cook School of Business, the self-proclaimed “Oldest Business School West of the Mississippi.” U.S. News anoints Cook 13th best for supply chain/logistics, ahead of Harvard Business School at No. 15. Cook also comes out tied at 14th in entrepreneurship, alongside the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill’s Kenan-Flagler Business School, and above Columbia Business School and the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, both tied at 17. Cook is also absent from the U.S. News top 100 business schools list, while Harvard holds the No. 1 spot, Darden sits at No. 11, and UNC-Chapel Hill comes in at No. 19. Or look at Seattle University’s Albers School of Business and Economics, 14th in U.S. News’ specialty ranking for accounting. That puts Albers on equal footing with Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management and U.C. Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. Albers makes no appearance in the U.S. News overall top 100, while Kellogg ranks 6th...

It’s Harder Than Ever for MBA Candidates to Succeed...

It’s the dream of every MBA candidate who registers to a prestigious MBA school. A coveted position in investment banking or consulting, with a salary only heard of in the movies. While this reality does occur for a small percentage of MBA candidates, the reality is far different since the overall economic and MBA dynamics have changed. These changes include: (1) Accreditation Creep: Merely having a degree is no longer sufficient enough to climb the economic ladder. With an increasingly global workforce and the changing nature of work, today’s employees need to be more educated, adaptable and competitive. (2) Growing Number of MBA Programs: With the success of the first MBA programs starting in the early 20th century, there has been the inevitable global growth of them. Today, nearly every post-secondary institution has a MBA program due to increased tuition revenues and gaining greater prestige. (3) Growing MBA Supply: With the growth in the number of MBA programs, there has also been a corresponding growth in MBA graduates. This has led to a corresponding imbalance between the demand for MBA jobs and the number of MBA graduates. It is not only the economics of the MBA that have changed but also the economics of business. These changes include: (1) Growing Supply: As a result of the latest recession, there has been a growing supply of qualified candidates competing against freshly minted MBA graduates. Given the choice between a seasoned business candidate with practical work experience versus a newly graduated MBA candidate, businesses are more likely to prefer the seasoned business candidate. (2) International Competition: As the economy continues to globalize, so does its labor force. With a growing number of international subsidiaries, corporations are finding that qualified MBA graduates...

Things you need to know if doing an MBA

If you’re thinking of going back to school and getting an MBA, it’s first critical to determine whether your expectations for an advanced business degree are aligned with the advantages that it could provide. Here are a few things to consider. MBA programmes offer three different types of benefits, all of which vary tremendously from one school to another: 1. Practical leadership and management skills. Management education has changed significantly over the last few decades. Previously it focused on quantitative analysis in areas such as finance and operations, with little emphasis on other aspects of organisational life. As a result, MBAs were often seen as bean counters. So MBA programmes responded by expanding their offerings in areas such as strategy, organisational behaviour and leadership. 2. A credential that sends a signal to the marketplace. The nature of the signal being sent depends on the specific MBA program’s reputation, and this is not simply a matter of prestige. Harvard, Stanford and Wharton routinely top lists of US business schools, but they also have a reputation for entitlement and arrogance. While some firms seek out graduates from elite schools, others avoid them out of a concern that they will be difficult to work with and disruptive to the established culture. 3. Membership in a learning community and access to an alumni network. Business school emphasises working in groups, and MBA students often learn as much from their peers as they do from lecturers, so it’s important to consider who you’ll be working alongside for two years.Lea la noticia completa en Irish...

What makes a global top 10 university?

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is in first place in the latest league table of the world’s best universities. It’s the third year in a row that the US university, famous for its science and technology research, has been top of the QS World University Rankings. Another science-based university, Imperial College London, is in joint second place along with Cambridge University. Behind these in fourth place is Harvard University, the world’s wealthiest university. And two more UK universities share joint fifth place, University College London and Oxford. With King’s College London in 16th place, it means that London has three institutions in the top 20. Edinburgh University is joint 17th and there are two Swiss institutions, ETH Zurich and Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, in this top tier. But US universities are still in the majority, taking 11 of the places in the top 20. Even though some university leaders might be sceptical about such rankings, they will all be sharply aware of their significance. Mike Nicholson, Oxford University’s head of admissions, says: “It’s fair to say that it would be a foolish university that did not pay close attention to how league tables are constructed.”. Read full story by Sean Coughlan at...

Study Business Abroad: Great Places for International Students...

Twenty years ago, studying business abroad was only for the adventurous or the downright quirky. Today, it’s increasingly commonplace. Why? Because employers of all sizes are now searching for – and fighting over – the truly international employee: the one who really understands how business is done in key markets around the globe. Those who study abroad while they’re young have international experience before they’ve even reached the workplace. Already ahead of their peers, they’ll be multilingual and have an increased understanding of different cultures. But what is it actually like to study abroad and what is the right location – or locations – for you? How is student life in Ireland different to student life in India, for example? What does a MacBook Pro cost in Australia compared to Austria? How much will a cappuccino set you back in Budapest compared to Beijing? In an effort to access their invaluable advice and experiences, we surveyed students from 29 leading business schools and universities around the world who are part of CEMS, the Global Alliance in Management Education. As part of their Master’s in International Management, the students are required to spend at least one term at a partner school in another country. For every location, we asked local students: What are the three key things you think someone coming to study in your home country should know before they arrive? And we asked visiting students: What are the three key things you wish you had known before you began studying at a school outside your home country? So before you get those visa applications sent off, find the study destination that suits you. Our country by country guide begins here… * You will note that we have not...

Domestic MBA Candidates May Lose Out To Internationals...

Domestic MBA candidates may face missing out on places at some business schools in Europe this year. Candidates from outside a school’s main region are more likely to gain admission to MBA programs, according to a former admissions director at Columbia Business School, while some schools place a cap on domestic candidates, and others defer local candidates for a year to keep their cohorts diverse. Frank Fletcher who is head of recruitment at Belgium’s Vlerick Business School, considered one of the world’s best in the MBA rankings, said that “we enrol a limited number of Dutch students” for its MBA, to keep the class international. Data compiled by the Financial Times based on the MBA class of 2013 show that only 19% of Vlerick’s MBA students are from Belgium. Most European business schools enrol a huge number of international students, compared to the US where there are more domestic students studying for MBA degrees. They argue that this makes a class more “diverse” – increasing learning and employment opportunities. Several European business schools contacted by BusinessBecause said they factor a candidate’s geographical background into their admissions processes, although some said they do not look at this factor in isolation. Humphrey Sopakuwa, an advisor responsible for recruitment at the Netherlands’ Tias Business School, also ranked in the top-100, said that “we receive a lot of applications from certain regions and at one point during the admissions cycle we would probably not consider applications”. According to rankings data, 100% of Tias’ MBA students registered a citizenship which differs from the Netherlands, suggesting the school admitted no domestic students last year…Lea la noticia completa en...

IIT-Delhi to announce new MBA curriculum

IIT-Delhi’s department of management studies will soon unveil a new MBA curriculum to catch up with the world’s best in business management, officials said on Saturday. The announcement came after the Indian Institute of Technology organised a “MBA Curriculum Review Stakeholders’ Consultation Workshop” in a bid to respond to the changing times and catch up with the world’s best in business management education. According to a statement issued by the premier institute, the workshop focused on developing content that relates to the interests and demands of the industry. It also aimed at obtaining inputs in specific functional areas including information technology and business analytics. Lea la noticia completa en Times of...

Wharton MBA Applications Rise

The University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School posted a 1.2% increase in applications to its M.B.A. program this year, a bright spot of admissions news after some years of declines. The profile for the class that started this fall and will graduate in 2016, published online, reported that 6,111 people applied for admission to the full-time M.B.A. program, compared with 6,036 for the fall 2013 entering class. The application figures are still far below those the school saw in the wake of the financial crisis, when young professionals flocked to business schools to boost their credentials in a brutal job market. In 2010, Wharton reported receiving 6,819 applications. Some other schools also reported brief declines in the years since the downturn, as prospective students shied away from debt and rethought their career plans as Wall Street opportunities disappeared; Wharton, long a training ground for finance elites, was particularly hard hit. Yet Wharton’s admissions team has said it places more focus on applicant quality than on quantity. In recent years, its students are becoming a more high-achieving group. The average GMAT score for enrolled students this fall was 728–on a scale of 200 to 800–up from 725 last year and 718 for the class that enrolled in fall 2012. Application volume has likewise gone up at other top-tier schools, including Harvard Business School (up 2.4%) and the New York University Stern School of Business (up 6.2%). Many institutions reported that their application growth was buoyed by interest from international candidates.Lea la noticia completa en Wall Street Journal...