Articles that mention MIT Sloan

These 6 Sloan Startups Are so MIT

When it comes to ground-breaking scientific discoveries and technological developments, MIT kills it. But the accolades in those areas sometimes might overshadow the fact that the Institute fosters stellar businesses, as well. Sloan is a big name among business schools, and its students have launched many a startup that are just so MIT. Let’s celebrate these Sloan startups: Here’s a list of some of the most interesting startups from the B school – both current student ventures, along with spin-outs. Insurify This Sloan spin-out is taking car insurance into the 21st Century. Insurify has already made waves with its auto insurance shopping platform, which includes a virtual insurance agent – Evia – who’s there to help. The venture secured $2 million in seed funding in January, so it’s off to a steady start. GoodSIRS The recent winner of MIT Sloan’s Healthcare Innovation Prize, GoodSIRS is trying to save millions of lives each year with its filtration treatment for sepsis. The common, fatal condition occurs when people’s bodies go into overdrive trying to fight an infection, causing organ failure. With GoodSIRS’ selective filtration technology, we’ll be able to remove the offending chemicals from the bloodstream and prevent deaths from sepsis. Gomango Here in the U.S., we walk into a grocery store, peruse the produce section and think nothing of it. In developing nations where refrigeration is lacking, a significant portion of food spoils before it makes it to market. Gomango is creating a network of rental cooling boxes in India that would let farmers prevent food spoilage, sell more at markets and even transport their products to areas further away to be more lucrative. EarID We love talking about what’s good and not good for your health, yet we know...

13 Tips From MBA Students On How To Succeed In A Top-Tier Program...

MBA students spend months if not years working to get into an MBA program. However, once they are in a program, the everyday demands take over and students have little time to think about how to get the most out of their program. To better understand how to hit the ground running and to make sure you maximize success in your MBA program, we turned to recent and current students of top-tier MBA programs for advice. Tip #1: Focus on Career Experimentation Alex Haddock, Darden School of Business (University of Virginia), Interned at Goldman Sachs Alex Haddock, a rising Second Year at Darden, suggests that you go beyond the career exploration offered through recruiting. During the recruiting process, you will have access to top companies that will try to give you a sense of what it’s like to work in different fields and functions. However, business school offers many other opportunities to learn about new roles and industries – and the chance to actually use and experiment with the skills required in a variety of roles. Classes, clubs and extracurricular experiences will let you engage in real consulting, marketing and entrepreneurial engagements, just to name a few. During his first year, Alex was able to help a local company organize its accounting records, work with a public school to streamline its planning processes, and compete in a start-up pitch competition. If you take advantage of the resources at your school, you can leave after two years already having lived the roles of marketer, banker, consultant and more. Then you can make the best decision about your career path and your future. Tip #2: Make the Most of the MBA “Card” David Newsome, Sloan School of Management (Massachusetts Institute of...

The 25 Most Successful MIT Business School Graduates...

The Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology has powerful connections throughout the world, as evidenced by the 92% of the Class of 2013 with job offers within three months of graduation. Sloan was founded in 1914 and is named for Alfred Pritchard Sloan, the MIT grad who drove General Motors to dominance in 23 years as a CEO. The school turns out private and public sector leaders like former United Nations Secretary General Kofi Annan, Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, and Microsoft chairman John W. Thompson. Here are 25 of the most successful Sloan grads: John S. Reed, Class of ’65, served as the CEO of Citigroup and the chair of the New York Stock Exchange. Today he’s the chair of the MIT Board of Trustees. William A. Porter graduated from Sloan in 1967, and he changed market history in 1982 when he founded ETrade. A 1971 Sloan grad, Donald Fites served as CEO of Caterpillar, Inc. from 1990 to 1999. Kofi Annan graduated from Sloan in 1972. He served as Secretary General of the United Nations from 1997 to 2006. Judy Lewent, Class of ’72, became the first female CFO of a major corporation when she joined pharmaceutical company Merk & Co. in 1980. A 1975 Sloan grad, Philip Condit served as the CEO of Boeing from 1996 to 2003. Benjamin Netanyahu graduated in 1976, and he’s gone on to be elected prime minister of Israel three times, a position he currently holds. Keiji Tachikawa got his MBA in 1978. He’s president of Japan’s version of NASA, the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA). Magid Abraham got his MBA in 1981. He founded Comscore, the market analytics company, in 1999. A 1982 Sloan grad, Alan...