Articles that mention Virginia Darden

13 Tips From MBA Students On How To Succeed In A Top-Tier Program...

MBA students spend months if not years working to get into an MBA program. However, once they are in a program, the everyday demands take over and students have little time to think about how to get the most out of their program. To better understand how to hit the ground running and to make sure you maximize success in your MBA program, we turned to recent and current students of top-tier MBA programs for advice. Tip #1: Focus on Career Experimentation Alex Haddock, Darden School of Business (University of Virginia), Interned at Goldman Sachs Alex Haddock, a rising Second Year at Darden, suggests that you go beyond the career exploration offered through recruiting. During the recruiting process, you will have access to top companies that will try to give you a sense of what it’s like to work in different fields and functions. However, business school offers many other opportunities to learn about new roles and industries – and the chance to actually use and experiment with the skills required in a variety of roles. Classes, clubs and extracurricular experiences will let you engage in real consulting, marketing and entrepreneurial engagements, just to name a few. During his first year, Alex was able to help a local company organize its accounting records, work with a public school to streamline its planning processes, and compete in a start-up pitch competition. If you take advantage of the resources at your school, you can leave after two years already having lived the roles of marketer, banker, consultant and more. Then you can make the best decision about your career path and your future. Tip #2: Make the Most of the MBA “Card” David Newsome, Sloan School of Management (Massachusetts Institute of...

10 Most Expensive MBA Programs for Out-of-State Students...

The U.S. News Short List, separate from our overall rankings, is a regular series that magnifies individual data points in hopes of providing students and parents a way to find which undergraduate or graduate programs excel or have room to grow in specific areas. Be sure to explore The Short List: College and The Short List: Grad School to find data that matters to you in your college or grad school search. It’s not unusual for MBA candidates to pay more than $50,000 for a two-year program, but out-of-state students at some public schools may pay that price or more for just one school year. For the 2013-2014 school year at University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, for example, out-of-state students paid $57,394. Ross had the highest tuition and fees for out-of-state students attending public universities, according to data submitted to U.S. News by 51 ranked public institutions. The Haas School of Business at University of California—Berkeley once charged out-of-state students the most but it charged $53,959 in 2013-2014, putting it in the middle of the pack among the 10 schools where non-locals pay the most. [Learn three mistakes to avoid when building your MBA budget.] The difference in tuition and fees for in-state and out-of-state MBAs at Haas and Ross was a few thousand dollars, but at some schools that difference was more than $10,000. At the University of North Carolina—Chapel Hill’s Kenan-Flagler School of Business, students from outside of North Carolina paid $54,385, which is $19,432 more than in-state students. There was an almost $16,000 price difference at the McCombs School of Business at the University of Texas—Austin, with students from outside of Texas paying $48,832. Among all public schools offering MBA programs, out-of-state students paid...