Articles that mention Columbia

3 interview questions every applicant to Columbia b-school must nail...

If you have your sights set on Columbia, it pays to be ready for the kinds of questions they’ll ask during the interview process. Columbia is unique among top business schools in that they don’t require an applicant to undergo an interview as a requirement for admission. However, being granted an interview can be a good sign in Columbia’s notoriously competitive process. Typically, between 5,500 and 7,000 applications to the business school are received each year. In 2010, for example, only 15% were accepted. So answering questions in the right way is key. Here are three sample interview questions from Columbia business school interviews — and tips on how to navigate each. 1. What kind of leader are you? Although this is an open-ended question, it’s best to respond with a concrete example. Giving a list of adjectives, such as “goal-oriented,” “collaborative” or “future-focused,” won’t set you apart from the crowd as much as a brief yet specific story that illustrates the kind of leader you are. Columbia is looking for high-impact leaders who seek out to achieve results — and who get them. However, the way you pursue those results is also important. The school wants students who can work well together on teams and who can leverage the best of what each person brings to the table; after all, these are skills that will serve well not only in the learning community but also in the business world beyond. Make sure to include results in your response. Since Columbia wants high-impact leaders, show how your efforts made a positive impact on a situation or group of people. A good response might include something like, “I am proud to report that we were able to raise $75,000 in...

These were the highest paid MBAs in 2015

One MBA graduate last year struck gold to the tune of a $467,000 payday. Others, meanwhile, had a much harder time establishing financial footing. Those figures are according to a Poets & Quants report compiling the highest and lowest base salaries of 2015 MBA graduates, based on business school employment records. The highest reported MBA starting compensation came in at a whopping $467,000, more than 50 percent higher than the next highest base salary last year. The sum went to a private equity employee who graduated from Columbia Business School, whose graduates last year saw a median salary of $125,000. Another Columbia graduate took a $320,000 per year starting salary in consumer products. Meanwhile, a Stanford MBA saw the lowest reported compensation. The graduate had a base salary of $18,000 at a non-profit organization in Europe, according to Poets & Quants. Last year’s Stanford graduates working in non-profits enjoyed median starting salaries of $100,000. The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, meanwhile, reported a graduate with a low compensation of $24,000. Stanford MBA graduates earning the highest salaries were most commonly employed in hedge funds, private equity, health care, investment management, and venture capital, according to the report. On the opposite side of the spectrum, “social impact” industries, like non-profits and government work, were the most common industries among the lowest reported salaries. Though many schools reported these earning profiles, the numbers can be considered a conservative estimate due to the fact that schools attempt to protect the privacy of their graduates and prevent inflating applicants’ expectations.Read full story:...

The Top Business Schools for Networking

Online graduate school guide graduateprograms.com has published its list of the top 25 business schools for networking. Over 13,000 business school students and alumni were surveyed and asked to rank their schools’ network quality on a scale of one to 10. Networking is amongst the foremost components of professional life. For MBAs, a business school is a networking nirvana; a melting pot of aspiring business leaders, experts and entrepreneurs providing an endless pool of potential partners, colleagues, employers and employees. Stanford GSB took first position with a network quality of 9.90. Columbia and Harvard made up the top three. INSEAD came close behind in fourth position with 9.75; its Fontainebleau campus the chief networking hub in Europe. With the rankings dominated by US schools, INSEAD along with London Business School in ninth fly the flag for Europe. Making up the rest of the top ten are Texas A&M University and Chicago’s Booth School in joint fifth; the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in seventh; the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School in eighth; and Cornell University: Johnson in tenth. Exposure to a strong network of business professionals is crucial for an MBA’s future career development. MBA applicants choosing and comparing business schools will always have networking opportunities at the forefront of their minds. The top business schools for networking boast an impressive array of high-level alumni. Stanford’s influential MBA alumni include the CEO of eBay, John Donahoe, and the chief executive of General Motors, Mary Barra. Harvard yields an impressive amount of top CEOs including the CEO of JPMorgan Chase, Jamie Dimon, and the CEO of General Electric, Jeffrey Immelt. INSEAD is also a breeding ground for successful professionals, including the CEO of Lloyds Banking Group, Antonio Horta-Osorio,...