Articles from Entrepreneur Magazine

How to Use Social Media to Boost Your MBA Application...

Your online presence can affect your MBA application. Everyday, social media is integrated more and more into our lives. We must be cognizant of our actions and apply them in ways that help us reach our goals and not hinder them. For many students receiving their MBA is more than a goal, it is a life-long dream. As universities begin to scale back on essays and increase the research they do online, potential students must have a strategy for how they approach their online presence. Consider Your Privacy Settings Yes, if you apply to an MBA program or a job, chances are that they will be looking at your social-media profiles. Do yourself a favor and check your privacy settings. For Facebook, hide images and posts that you don’t wish to be shown. Set personal information to private and set your positive information, such as past jobs, to public. For LinkedIn, make sure that your profile is visible. Make sure that you created your vanity URL, check the profile for grammar and spelling, and be as thorough as possible when completing your profile. For other social-media profiles, use your discretion. Search Yourself This is important. Be sure that you know of anything an admissions staff member could potentially see online.Search your name, your email and your name against other companies and organizations that you have ever been associated with. For most of us, there won’t be many incriminating results, but we cannot know if we do not look. Follow Admissions Staff As anyone who has ever had to do a background check can attest, it can be time consuming and tiring. Make it easy for admissions people to find you. Following admissions staff can be helpful to them and...

Just These 5 Lessons Made the MBA Worth the Money...

The best career decision I ever made was going back to school and earning my MBA degree. At the time, my employer footed the entire expense of that education but even if it had not, I had every intention of paying for it myself. Here’s why. My undergrad degree had been in journalism, which was the job I had for the first 10 years of my career. When I transitioned to corporate communications, I realized that there was a lot I still needed to learn about business. Earning the MBA degree has been an invaluable investment to me as a corporate professional. The education I received gave me a solid grounding in quantitative coursework such as statistics, finance, accounting and operations management. It also provided wide exposure to qualitative courses, such as organizational behavior, business ethics, project management and business writing. While many of the details for those classes have dimmed from my memory over the years, there are five major lessons learned from business school that I continue to use on a daily basis since completing that degree. 1. Teams make better decisions than individuals Almost every MBA course at the business school I attended required team projects and group accountability. This was during the early 2000’s, when the concept of teams within the workplace became the norm, and it has continued through today. Coming from a solo news reporting background, the “team concept” was a new experience for me. However, every team interaction since has reinforced this lesson that teams make better decisions than any individual in the group. Related: How Much Is An MBA Degree Really Worth? 2. Correlation is not causation Prior to my graduate courses in statistics I had thought that correlation (a mutual...

How Much Is An MBA Degree Really Worth?

What’s an MBA degree really worth? And how much more money does an MBA from Harvard, Stanford or Wharton get you over a career than one from Texas A&M, Ohio State, or the University of Iowa? Those are questions that perplex and confound many who are deciding whether to get the degree and, if so, where to get it from. Not everyone can get into the most highly selective business schools. So many candidates have to face the question over whether it’s worth getting the MBA from a second- or even third-tier school. A new analysis done exclusively for Poets&Quants by PayScale, which collects salary data from individuals through online pay comparison tools, shows that the MBA–even from schools that lack global or national caché–delivers hefty seven-figure income over a 20-year period. PayScale used its database of MBA graduates at the top 50 U.S. schools to calculate an estimate of median pay and bonus over the entire 20-year span. The numbers are conservative. They do not include stock-based compensation of any kind, the cash value of retirements benefits, or other non-cash benefits, such as health care. The estimates are for base salary, cash bonuses and profit sharing in today’s dollars over a 20-year period from from 1994 to 2014. They are not a projection of future earnings. But the estimates show that the MBA degree–despite all the second-guessing over its value since the Great Recession–is one of the surest paths to a lucrative career. For the most part, the results are exactly what you would expect: The highly ranked, big brand schools tend to deliver the highest earnings over a 20-year period. Harvard Business School’s MBAs come out on top, with median income of $3.233,000. Stanford MBA holders are...