Articles from Canadian Business

How MBA schools are trying to teach character, not just skills...

Mary Crossan’s MBA students can analyze business environments in Indonesia and Milwaukee, break down Coke’s brand identity versus Pepsi’s and list three reasons why Uber should pull out of Mexico. But most still aren’t prepared for the assignment Crossan throws at them in the leadership course she teaches at Ivey Business School. Crossan asks her students to close their eyes, clear their minds, and imagine that they’re dying. As they think about their last few days on Earth, and eventually their final moments, she urges the class to consider how they want to live them. Are there conversations they need to have with colleagues or family? Behaviours they want to drop? What’s giving their life a sense of purpose? “It can be challenging for some people,” Crossan says of the 20-minute guided visualization, “but it can also be very liberating and clarifying. It helps you figure out what’s important, and that can help ground you when you face challenging situations later on.” For many MBA programs now, global experience comes standard Imagining the day of their own demise isn’t one of the highly marketable business competencies most grads will eventually list on their C.V.s, but the exercise offers essential insights to future leaders, says Crossan, who’s one of a growing number of MBA instructors interested in teaching leadership character alongside hard skills like accounting and operations management. Who executives are—how they make decisions, what motivates them, how they respond to stress—can be just as important as what they know how to do. Crossan points to Volkswagen’s recent admission that it rigged diesel-engine emissions tests as an example: That ethical lapse wasn’t caused by business incompetency, but rather by key managers’ poor judgment. “We’ve kind of hit a wall on...

The Top 10 MBA Schools in Canada

Canadian Business’s 23rd annual MBA Guide has everything you need to pick the right program for you. An MBA is an investment in yourself, and you should get a decent return. The MBA programs on this list combine competitive value, solid classroom experience and good name recognition. But—like any ranking—it’s only part of the picture. The right program for you is one that meets your needs—whether that’s regional expertise, specialized subjects, industry connections or flexible scheduling. 10: Ted Rogers School of Management Ryerson University, Toronto 9. Asper School of Business University of Manitoba, Winnipeg 8. Haskayne School of Business University of Calgary, Calgary 7. Telfer School of Management University of Ottawa, Ottawa 6. Gustavson School of Business University of Victoria, Victoria 5. Alberta School of Business University of Alberta, Edmonton 4. John Molson School of Business Concordia University, Montreal 3. Schulich School of Business York University, Toronto 2. HEC Montreal Montreal 1. Queen’s School of Business Queen’s University, Kingston Read full story:...