Why NYU’s B-School Teaches Mindfulness

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Yale’s Ted Snyder is Business School Dean of the Year...

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Business School Faculty Feedback: A Tool For Excellence Or Appeasement?...

Faculty feedback is supposed to be a great tool to assess the quality of education being imparted in an academic institution. For academics in general and business schools in particular, the faculty feedback mechanism is considered to be the vital component, key element, important parameter , an effective tool and clear indicator for assessments and appraisals. For B-schools, the significance of feedback is even more keeping in mind the market orientation of MBA degree. Simply put, MBA degree is mostly result oriented with clear outcomes (job opportunities) for the consumers (students). Hence, students ought to have the real power to evaluate the quality of service providers (teachers). Let us understand the importance of faculty feedback system in business schools. Most of the schools use the students’ feedback to assess the faculty, courses, delivery, pedagogy and content; some schools connect it to evaluate faculty’s yearly appraisal. There are several debates and meetings conducted inside the schools on how the faculty feedback system should be understood and interpreted. This is applied from top rated to schools to ordinary schools. Some schools evaluate based on students’ online digital submissions using some software, while some schools believe in paper-pen based submissions. There are qualitative and quantitative feedbacks. There are also schools that take both subject feedback and faculty feedback to check correlation between a faculty and subject. Many B-Schools – which have started to place emphasis on faculty feedback by their students – do not know the application of the insights thrown by data. And primary reason for inaction is the faculty crunch. This provides a cocoon to faculty with middling performance. The B-Schools are as well happy to keep the feedback system going without any effort to infuse meaning in it. Why...

10 Leading MBA Programs That Produce Immediate Placement After Graduation...

Discounting MBA programs at Harvard and Stanford, where growing demand is related to entrepreneurship particularly with Harvard Business School’s Rock Center for Entrepreneurship, the following programs are found to produce the highest rate of job placement successes with employers as McKinsey & Co., Goldman Sachs, Amazon, Bain & Co. In a report by Business Insider, the over-all ranking of these schools were determined with consideration of such factors as reputation, starting salary average, gap-length between graduation and job placement, GMAT result and program cost. 1 University of Chicago, Booth School of Business at 98% With top placements at McKinsey & Co., Bain & Co., Amazon, Boston Consulting Group, and Bank of America graduates of the Booth School of Business are snapped up within three months of completing the program. 2 Washington University in St. Louis, Olin Business School at 97% Focused on both corporate and nonprofit consulting, entrepreneurship and global studies, a considerable number of Olin graduates go into financial services, consumer products and technology industry. 3 University of Warwick, Warwick Business School at 97% Placements are largely with American Express, Citibank, Amazon and Goldman Sachs for graduates of this program. 4 University of Washington, Foster School of Business at 96% McKinsey & Co., Starbucks, Amazon, Johnson & Johnson and Northwestern Mutual are quick to grab Foster’s graduates. 5 Georgia Tech, Scheller College of Business at 96% Borrowing largely from Georgia Tech’s strength in technological focus, this program produces graduates that have a more current and relevant business training. A large percentage of students go on to fill consulting and technology posts. 6 University of Virginia, Darden School of Business at 95% Bain & Co. and A.T. Kearney and similar firms employ a good number of Darden graduates. The...

Facebook actually does want MBAs – no matter what Sheryl Sandberg says...

Though Facebook COO Sheryl Sandberg got an MBA from Harvard Business School, she has questioned whether such a degree actually helps people in the tech industry. In a recent Quora thread, she even went so far as to say: “MBAs are not necessary at Facebook and I don’t believe they are important for working in the tech industry.” Whether or not this is true is hard to pinpoint, partially because Sandberg’s wording is vague. What does she mean by important? Important to get a job, to do you job, to move up the ladder, to start your own business? But there is one part of her claim we can check, one that is useful for anyone considering either an MBA or the tech industry. Do hiring managers in Silicon Valley agree with Sandberg? In other words, does having an MBA matter in getting a job? Research suggests that, in fact, hiring managers don’t agree (even at Facebook itself). Silicon Valley wants MBAs. Tapwage, a job discovery startup, analyzed over 100,000 job listings to find out whether having an MBA mattered in Silicon Valley. They started from this premise: “If hiring managers don’t believe in the value of an MBA, there wouldn’t be any point in stating it as a criteria for selection on job postings.” Looking at Facebook in particular, they found that the company had 75 jobs (9% of total openings) that either had a preference for an MBA (or required one). They found similar or higher percentages at other tech giants like Google, Amazon, and Apple. When Tapwage compared tech companies to Wall Street banks, they found that MBAs were actually in higher demand in tech companies. An example: Facebook looks for three times as many MBAs...

20 top MBA programs whose grads land jobs right out of school...

Our sixth annual ranking of the 50 best business schools in the world evaluated MBA programs based on reputation, average starting salary after graduation, job-placement rate within three months of graduation, average GMAT score, and tuition and fees. (Read our full methodology here.) Because business school is such a hefty investment, the ability to get a job soon after graduating is an important factor in choosing where to go. To come up with our list of the 20 top business schools for getting a job right away, we broke out the schools by job-placement rate. Some schools that ranked highly on our main list didn’t make this ranking because of lower job-placement figures, such as Harvard (91%) and Stanford (86%). It’s worth noting though that many students at these schools decide to start their own businesses — an employment result that schools don’t factor into their overall job-placement statistic. Keep scrolling to see the best business schools for finding a job after graduating, listed here in ascending order by job-placement percentage. Columbia University — Columbia Business School Location: New York, New York Job-placement rate: 93% Students begin crafting their network and community within the business world the minute they arrive at Columbia, thanks in part to the school’s cluster system, which places first-year students in “clusters” of 65 to 70 people who take all their core classes together. Columbia also counts some of the greatest minds in finance among its alumni, including Berkshire Hathaway CEO Warren Buffett and former Bank of America executive Sallie Krawcheck. University of London — London Business School (LBS) Location: London, England Job-placement rate: 93% University of London’s business school is once again the best outside the US. With 75% of the top-500 global companies...

Growing Scandal Threatens Stanford B-School Reputation...

Fallout from a reported love triangle at Stanford’s Graduate School of Business (GSB) has already claimed the school’s dean, sparked lawsuits and countersuits, and threatened the reputation of one of the nation’s most prestigious business schools. To make matters worse, it appears that Stanford is now dragging Apple into the fray. What happens next is anyone’s guess, but what’s allegedly happened so far would definitely make for a juicy TV mini-drama. According to reports, the 12-year marriage of GSB professors James Phills and Deborah Gruenfeld had been on the rocks for some time. In 2012, Gruenfeld finally decided to call it quits and moved out. That sparked a bitter divorce and custody battle that has cost the couple nearly half a million dollars. Three years later, it’s still ongoing. That’s not unusual, but soon after the separation, Gruenfeld reportedly began a clandestine affair with GSB dean Garth Saloner, who at the time happened to be both her and her husband’s boss. And wouldn’t you know it, Stanford ended up firing Gruenfeld’s estranged husband, ostensibly for taking several leaves of absence to teach at Apple University. While Saloner disclosed the incestuous relationship to Stanford provost John Etchemendy and publicly claims to have recused himself from the termination decision, Phills retained access to his wife’s emails and text messages, including “private” conversations with her new boyfriend, who seemed to be very much involved. So Phills sued the school and the dean for wrongful termination, alleging the usual litany of hostile workplace, ongoing retaliation and harassment. In addition, he believes that GSB is trying to force him out of his residence by recalling a low-interest rate loan, now that his wife is no longer living in the home they built on campus....

Stanford to MBAs: Study now, start-up later

In an environment of billion-dollar valuations for private companies and cloud-based software that makes start-up launches easier than ever, staying focused on academics can be challenging. Should you hit the books, or try to launch the next, great start-up when the idea and capital strike? Over the last few years, as the economy has recovered, Garth Saloner, outgoing dean of Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business, has watched the number of MBA graduates who launch ventures (in founding roles) rise to 16 percent for the class of 2015, slightly lower than the all-time high of 18 percent of graduates reached two years ago. “We’ve never seen that before. It’s a big number,” Saloner said. A decade ago that figure was in the single digits. Of course, graduates launching start-ups is something to laud and a testament to Stanford’s competitive two-year MBA program that can open a lot of doors in Silicon Valley. U.S. News & World Report ranked Stanford University’s business school No. 1 for 2015, and edged out Harvard University and the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton. On the other hand, more ventures founded out of business school also suggests students are spending a huge bulk of time creating ventures. Aspiring entrepreneurs may not be taking full advantage of lessons from professors and visiting professionals during the business school program. “What gives me pause is when students get so engaged in the start-up itself in the second year that they devote their energy to it at the expense of their second year,” said Saloner in an interview earlier this month. “That’s a lost opportunity.” Read MoreWomen closing the gender gap for entrepreneurship By the way, it’s not like Stanford business school students are dropping out in droves for start-up...

How to Get an MBA Scholarship

Some tips on how to increase your chances for getting more money A big question on the mind of many an MBA applicant: “How do I get a scholarship?” “It’s a question that everybody asks,” says Garry Cooke, assistant dean for student recruitment at the University of Illinois at Chicago’s College of Business Administration (UIC). Indeed, an MBA is expensive, and when you include living expenses and the opportunity cost of taking a year or two off from work, the grand total for getting the degree might seem astronomical. Fortunately for many cash-strapped applicants, many business schools tend to award scholarships to promising MBA applicants. This year, for instance, China’s CEIBS awarded around 12 million yuan (around 1.85 million USD) in merit scholarships, which was distributed to some 80 students, covering between 20 to 80 percent of tuition costs for each recipient. At NYU’s Stern School of Business, around 20 percent of all admitted students receive merit-based scholarships, the majority of which are awards for either full tuition or half tuition. Merit scholarships are just that: they’re given out based on how well an applicant has done, often in past academic and work endeavors. “These are awarded based on applicants’ academic and professional achievements, personal accomplishments, interview performance and potential contributions” to the MBA class, according to Yvonne Li, the director of admissions and career services at CEIBS. How do business schools make these decisions? In terms of potential contributions to an MBA class, “work experience is very important,” says Christine Cordt, MBA marketing manager at the Frankfurt School of Finance & Management, since a student with a strong background will be able to bring a lot to the table during class discussions. Additionally, according to Cordt, when awarding...

How To Ace The Job Interview: Advice For MBA Students...

This post was cowritten with Ellen Regan, a first year MBA student at the Darden School of Business, actively recruiting for internships in marketing. To help Marketing/GM students prepare for the recruiting gauntlet, we sat in on a couple of interviewing workshop sessions led by Johnson & Johnson and E.&J. Gallo at the Darden School of Business, University of Virginia. To see tips on how to ace the interview from Johnson & Johnson, click here. Below are tips from Lee Susen, Marketing Director, from E.&J. Gallo (the world’s largest wine company and one of the top 100 companies for flexible green jobs). Tips from E.&J. Gallo: 1. Understand what the interviewer is looking for – Typically an interviewer is trying to get a sense of four things when speaking with a candidate: interest, fit, leadership, and skill. Make sure you can answer the following questions: Can you articulate why you are interested in the industry/company/role? Can you demonstrate that you understand the core values of the company? Have you been a leader in the past and are you well positioned to lead people in the future? Do you have direct or transferable marketing skills that can add immediate value? 2. Know what a technical marketing interview question is – Technical marketing questions test your ability to demonstrate skill in marketing and passion for brand-building. They are typically shorter than marketing case questions (one sentence) and provide less parameters to candidates answering the question. Examples include: How would you improve the positioning of [brand]? Why is [brand] performing poorly and what would you do to fix it? How would you increase the penetration of [brand]? How would you extend [brand] into another category? Because these questions don’t provide a lot...

Tips for Applying to B-School After Years in the Workforce...

The average age of business school applicants has been trending downward for the past decade, and with that, work experience expectations have shifted as well. But not everyone is ready or in a position to take the business school plunge at 26 years old. If you want to pursue an MBA in your early-30s and beyond, consider these specific tips as you put together your application package. 1. Show career progression:​ When applying to a top-tier business school, you’ll need to show the admissions committee a clear path of professional growth. Avoid looking stagnant, as the admissions team wants to admit students who continually seek to learn and advance their skills and leadership abilities. Even if you have held the same job for several years, you should demonstrate career progression either in the formal sense, with increasingly higher-level job titles, or by pointing out how you have gradually taken on greater responsibilities. Coach your recommenders to specifically address this upward trajectory in their letters of support, as this will help convey your dedication to your professional development. Make sure to ask a current or recent manager for that recommendation, as a letter from a supervisor who worked with you eight years ago might raise a red flag. If you do select a recommender from the more distant past, make sure that you have really kept in touch and they can speak to your professional progression and work habits now. Also, if you have had several jobs, don’t worry about squeezing all of them on to the MBA resume. Highlight only the most important positions and responsibilities. 2. Show strong leadership: It’s understandable that younger applicants won’t have many examples of leadership one year out of school, but as time...

Facebook’s Sheryl Sandberg says you don’t need an MBA to be successful in tech...

There’s a longstanding Silicon Valley stereotype that MBAs are risk-averse, entitled, and brainwashed into being boring, and are therefore not suited for the fast-paced technology world. The idea of foregoing a formal education to pursue an entrepreneurial venture is furthered by tech leaders like billionaire investor Peter Thiel, who has a $100,000 fellowship for students who drop out of college to start a business. Facebook founder and CEO Mark Zuckerberg may have dropped out of Harvard as an undergraduate, but his COO Sheryl Sandberg followed a more traditional path. She not only graduated from college but also received her MBA from Harvard Business School. She worked for a year as a McKinsey consultant and then spent time in the US Treasury before joining Google in 2001. Zuckerberg recruited her in 2008 to help him take his company to the next level. In a recent Quora post, Sandberg weighed in on the MBA debate, saying that her b-school experience gave her a solid business foundation but that she and the rest of Facebook’s leadership think “degrees are always secondary to skills.” “While I got great value from my experience, MBAs are not necessary at Facebook, and I don’t believe they are important for working in the tech industry,” she writes.Read full story: Business...