Articles that mention Harvard Business School

Harvard and Stanford MBAs Are Using This Brazilian Network To Land Jobs In Latin America...

Deep in the Latin America’s biggest economy, a network of MBAs from some of the US’s top schools is stirring. Founded by Patricia Volpi over a decade ago, the exclusive MBA Alumni Brasil community has grown to nearly 2,200 members, from 50 business schools including Harvard Business School and Stanford GSB. “The group has really taken off,” says the Indiana, Kelley School graduate. MBAAB helps graduates network and find MBA jobs through company visits, “happy hour” drinks doos, from São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro, and Belo Horizonte to Miami, New York and London, and job postings from companies such as Bloomberg, Microsoft and Nestlé. “The exchange of job opportunities drove the group,” says Patricia, who has worked at Frost & Sullivan, Telefonica and GNext, a recruitment firm. But Brazil is mired by a political crisis and a faltering economy. Its president, Dilma Rousseff, has been suspended and its central bank forecasts GDP to contract 3.5% in 2016. “One of the challenges was finding jobs that met MBAs’ salary expectations,” Patricia says. Below, BB speaks to two members of the MBAAB network working in São Paulo. A Hub For Entrepreneurs With a large financial center, well-regarded universities, and local heroes such as Dafiti, the e-commerce business backed with $250 million of venture capital, the city has a growing start-up ecosystem. “São Paulo is the best region in Brazil for entrepreneurs,” says Ric Scheinkman. The local entrepreneur is managing director and founding partner of Harpia Capital, an advisory and investment firm. He plans to study for an MBA at University of Miami, and says the MBAAB network has introduced him to top-level executives and entrepreneurs in São Paulo. “It has some of the best and brightest of the Brazilian business community,”...

Why More MBAs Should Buy Small Businesses

Searching for a small business to buy and run instead of taking a more traditional post-MBA job like consulting is an idea that we’re seeing catch on at top business schools. At the Harvard Business School, for example, the number of MBAs who decide to look for a business to acquire right after graduation has gone from less than a handful a decade ago to more than a dozen, and in an occasional year, twice that amount. Stanford’s most recent study of search funds also reports a record number of active search funds. Still, we often wonder why more students don’t follow the entrepreneurship-through-acquisition path. One of the most common concerns that we hear as we advise our students at HBS is that searching for a business to buy — a full-time endeavor — is too “risky.” While everyone should surely weigh this choice based on their own individual circumstances and subjective preferences, we think that these concerns about “risk” are misplaced and that searching for a business is less risky than other career paths that are traditionally considered more stable. We put quotes around “risk” because we don’t think our students are focused on financial measures of risk — like the volatility of lifetime earnings — when they tell us that searching for a business seems more “risky” than taking a more traditional job. We don’t think there is much data to assess the actual financial risk of searching in comparison to other more traditional careers because there isn’t much historical data on financial rewards for either career. And, interestingly, while our students talk to us a lot about the “risk,” they don’t talk to us about the money differential; indeed, when they look at the business plans...

Silicon Valley May Want MBAs More Than Wall Street Does...

PayPal co-founder Peter Thiel said MBAs are predisposed to “herdlike thinking and behavior.” Venture capitalist Marc Andreessen dubbed them a contrarian indicator, saying “if they want to go into tech, that means a bubble is forming.” In a post on the question-and-answer website Quora, Facebook Chief Operating Officer Sheryl Sandberg, who earned an MBA from Harvard in 1995, said that while she got “great value” from her experience, she wasn’t ready to recommend the degree to the country’s future tech stars. “MBAs are not necessary at Facebook and I don’t believe they are important for working in the tech industry,” Sandberg wrote. Silicon Valley’s trash talking of the MBA obscures the reality that U.S. tech companies are hiring B-school grads in ever-larger numbers. Business schools sent 16 percent of their 2015 graduates into technology jobs, according to a Bloomberg Businessweek survey of students who’d accepted offers by that spring, making it the No. 3 industry for MBA grads after finance and consulting. By one measure, Silicon Valley values MBAs more than Wall Street does. In 2015 tech companies paid business school graduates more than financial companies did, according to Businessweek’s poll of more than 9,000 MBAs. “If I said all people with a law degree are worthless, what would you say?” says Rich Lyons, dean at the University of California at Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. Forty-three percent of its 2015 class went into tech, according to the survey. “It’s such an unwarranted generalization. Firms wouldn’t keep coming back to hire our MBAs if it wasn’t a valuable skill set.” Amazon.com, Microsoft, Google, and IBM were among the 15 companies that hired the most MBAs in 2015, according to data reported by 103 business schools to Businessweek, proof that while...

Read Like an MBA: Top 5 Books Ivy Leaguers Read in Business School...

Want to get an Ivy League MBA education without the six-figure cost? It’s simple: read like an MBA student! We dug into the best school’s required reading lists Take a look at what MBA seekers at America’s top Ivy League schools are reading. Harvard Scaling Up Excellence: Getting to More Without Settling for Less by Robort Sutton and Huggy Rao “A great read that provides read, practical advice whether you’re a team of five or fifty thousand.” ––Lazlo Bock, Senior Vice President of People Operations, Google In Scaling Up Excellence, bestselling author, Robert Sutton and Stanford colleague, Huggy Rao Sutton offer a comprehensive guide to management in a package of enticing stories, subtly supported by references to high-end research. Their personal history in the Silicon Valley and their global access to interesting organizations provides a relevant backdrop. The main theme is that, while many good practices exist in organizations, they either get lost or there are difficulties when attempts are made to spread them (scale them) across the organization. The breadth of this theme means that this book will provide value to anyone who would like to see organizations improve. The benefits are not limited by industry, functional area or organizational size. Stanford What books do alumni from the Stanford Graduate School of Business recommend? Here’s one: Orbiting the Giant Hairball: A Corporate Fool’s Guide to Surviving with Grace by Gordon MacKenzie “It was written by a guy who made Hallmark cards. It’s about maintaining creativity in a corporate structure.” ––Tristan Walker, founder of Walker & Company Any business can morph into a giant hairball, a tangled, impenetrable mass of rules, traditions, and systems based on what worked in the past that can plunge it into mediocrity. Gordon MacKenzie...

Can An MBA Change Lives? This Stanford AND Harvard Grad Thinks So...

Investing in a business education is a major undertaking, and applicants focus a lot of attention on the immediate return that a place in a top business school will achieve. Whether in the data provided by schools on the latest graduating class, or in media rankings such as Forbes and the FT, emphasis is on the financial return on investment – post-MBA salary, securing a position at McKinsey, Google or Goldman, etc. But an MBA can provide a lifelong return that goes far beyond the initial career success you might enjoy. You have a business skill set that helps you perform to the highest level, a network of talented high-achievers to support your future ambitions, and friendships that can last a lifetime. Studying at Harvard Business School or Stanford GSB is the dream of many young professionals, but there are a small handful of individuals that study at Harvard and Stanford. That is the case for Heriberto Diarte, who graduated with a Stanford MBA in 1998, and then completed the Harvard Kennedy Masters in Public Administration (MPA) a year later. He sat in on a number of classes at HBS during his time in Boston, providing him with the rare opportunity to compare the students, teaching styles and personalities of the schools. In this interview, Heriberto talks about how his Stanford and Harvard experiences have accompanied his international career path, and continue to provide a return on his investment fifteen years later, as his latest venture hereO brings a GPS Watch tracking device for young children to market. Matt Symonds: Did your business education prove to be a good investment? Heriberto Diarte: The irony is that I did not maximize my post-MBA compensation nor position. I graduated from Stanford...

Elite MBA Students Are Spurning McKinsey, Bain For Freelance Consulting Sites...

An MBA job at McKinsey & Co or BCG was once the pinnacle for MBA students. But for graduates of elite schools like Harvard, Stanford or Wharton, freelance consulting is increasing alluring. As the rise of so-called unicorn companies like Uber or Airbnb — valued above a billion dollars — has spurred the “gig economy”, for a growing number of MBAs, the flexibility of short-term projects trumps the prestige of Bain & Co, et al. Harvard MBA Marta Mussacaleca worked at McKinsey and BCG before business school, but turned to HourlyNerd, a freelance consultancy site, to earn cash during the two-year degree. Some projects were more enjoyable than at established firms. “They have pushed me to become more adventurous,” she says. “Not having an evaluation committee scrutinizing your every move frees up creativity. I basically get to be my own consulting firm and am exposed to every single element in the process.”…Read full story:...

Perfect GMAT won’t help you get into this B school...

It’s not even November and Harvard has already denied students acceptance to its MBA program. While it comes as no surprise that about 89 out of every 100 applicants are turned down for admission to Harvard Business School, the true shock is that many of the first round “dings” made by HBS happen to impressive candidates. According to the business education website, Poets & Quants, around 60 out of those 89 candidates refused admission are highly qualified students who have stellar GMAT scores and extracurricular activities. The site revealed the profiles of candidates who were rejected before the notoriously competitive, first round of admission interviews. Three out of the applicants who submitted their profiles have “nosebleed-territory” GMAT scores of 780, which would put them in the 99th percentile of test takers in the world. They also boast near-perfect GPAs with extensive accomplishments and professional experience. One of the candidates rejected without an interview listed that he is a Stanford University graduate who manages a strategy team for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. “This case surprises me because not only are the statistics for this person very high, but he is also a rare case of a candidate in the aerospace industry,” said Sanford Kreisberg, founder of HBSGuru.com and an admissions consultant who specializes in Harvard MBA applications. “Aerospace is a recognized, if not beloved, industry at Harvard Business School.” In this instance, Kreisberg speculated that there are several reasons the student was eliminated from the first round of interviews such as a poor written application or an admissions board mistake. Still, Kreisberg explained that with an admissions rate of about 11 percent, Harvard rejects a lot of candidates with high test scores because HBS is looking to build a class...

Why a Harvard MBA is the fastest route to the corner or Oval office...

As a new crop of Harvard Business School students arrive for class this fall, they can expect to bulk up on mandatory first-year fundamentals such as financial reporting, leadership and organizational behavior. Meanwhile, second-year students are offered a wider range of elective courses that reflect the changing times, with increased emphasis on overseas travel, hands-on workshops and case studies on disruptor startups like Buzzfeed. It is “mission critical” to have first-hand experience in emerging markets, Felix Oberholzer-Gee, HBS senior associate dean, told CNBC’s “Power Lunch” this week. “Students must be globalized and diversified,” Oberholzer-Gee said. “We take them out of the classroom for extended periods of time, teach them competitive strategies beyond our borders. It’s imperative for any future leader to be completely global.” Unlike HBS students of five or 10 years ago, the current MBA class is less likely to end up at marquee firms like Goldman Sachs or Google because the tough post-recession job market has led many business-minded grads to eschew traditional jobs, and strike out on their own. Oberholzer-Gee said he thinks that’s not such a bad thing. “Today’s millennial graduates want to skip middle management and take on greater responsibility earlier on in their careers,” said Oberholzer-Gee. “Unknown micro-businesses with relatively shallow hierarchies have become much more attractive.” In 1908, with a faculty of 15 professors and 80 inaugural students, Harvard was the first school to establish a Master of Business Administration program. The program, which today has 936 full-time students and tuition topping $58,875 per year, is widely considered to be the gold standard for business leadership in Wall Street, Silicon Valley and other major economic sectors. It also is often one of the fastest routes to the corner office—or Oval Office—than any...

20 interview questions Harvard asks MBA candidates...

Being among the small percentage of applicants admitted to the No. 1 business school in the world immediately puts you in some seriously good company. Of the nearly 10,000 applicants to Harvard Business School’s class of 2017, only 11% were admitted. What made them stand out? As with any interview or exam, preparation is key. And when applying to Harvard, it’s vital. Stacy Blackman, founder of Stacy Blackman Consulting, helps clients earn admission to top MBA programs. She has an undergraduate degree from The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania and an MBA from the Kellogg Graduate School of Management at Northwestern University. Over the past decade, Blackman has studied successful Harvard interview transcripts. She put together an interview guide featuring sample questions, which are broken into three categories: past experiences, present attributes, and future goals. We’ve selected interview questions in each category from Blackman’s Harvard interview guide. Past experiences Your past experiences can tell a lot about how you’ve dealt with success and failure. When interviewing with Harvard, “expect to be asked a number of questions that will help interviewers gauge how life has tested you and how you responded to that test,” Blackman writes. Sample questions include: Why did you choose to work for your current company? Many people go straight from investment banking to a private equity firm. Why do you feel you need the MBA in between? Describe a situation where you successfully responded to change. Describe a time when you helped someone at work. Describe a mistake you’ve made within the past three years. Describe your greatest accomplishment. How would you describe your style for teaching peers? Tell me about a time you failed. The interviewer wants to know the rationale behind all...

Harvard B-school opens the flood gates with online courses...

After a pair of highly successful pilot runs, Harvard Business School is now opening its online program in business basics to students worldwide. The school is also inviting admitted MBA students to enroll in the program as a pre-MBA boot camp experience, particularly for non-traditional admits or those who need more basic quantitative work before showing up on campus. All told, slightly more than 1,100 students have now taken the primer on the fundamentals of business called CORe (Credential of Readiness) program. In the first beta starting last June, the trio of courses—Business Analytics, Economics for Managers, and Financial Accounting—were open to only undergraduate students attending colleges in Massachusetts and alumni. Some 600 students took the $1,500 two-month program. Harvard then tested the suite of courses on 500 managers at nine different companies in a B-to-B experiment. For the first time, HBS is now opening up the program—based on case studies and videos—to applicants worldwide, including adult learners who have been out of school up to 10 years, and students admitted to the school’s full-time, on-campus MBA program this fall. Initially, the program was designed largely for non-business undergraduates who needed the business basics to give them a leg up on the job market when they graduated from college. These latest changes could put the program in competition with more expensive Executive MBA programs, which demand a greater time commitment from managers with 10 or more years of work experience. EMBA programs cover a lot more ground, but Harvard’s imprimatur on this program of business basics could make it appealing to managers who otherwise would attend second-tier EMBA programs. CORe more directly competes with summer business programs for undergraduate students from schools like UC-Berkeley and Dartmouth College’s Tuck School...

How the Harvard MBA Compares To The Stanford MBA...

For the last three years, Harvard Business School (HBS) and Stanford Graduate School of Business (GBS) have led the Financial Times’ ranking of the world’s best master of business administration (MBA) programs. Stanford came in first in 2012, and Harvard topped the list in 2013 and 2014. In this year’s ranking, Harvard is still first, but Stanford is in fourth place after London Business School and University of Pennsylvania: Wharton. According to the Times Higher Education, the ranking “is based on a number of different factors including gender diversity and the international spread of students, but the heaviest weighting is placed on alumni salaries.” Based on the 2015 FT ranking, alumni from HBS and GBS have the highest salaries with $179,910 and $177,089, respectively—and they had the highest salaries in previous years as well. So what are the advantages and disadvantages of each program, and how do Harvard and Stanford compare? “TO EDUCATE LEADERS THAT MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE WORLD” “To educate leaders that make a difference in the world,” is the mission of the HBS MBA program. Harvard’s MBA program was founded in 1908 as the first program of its kind. The MBA takes two years: the goal of the first year courses is to provide students with a foundation in “broad-based fundamentals.” During the second year, students can choose from over 90 courses in ten different categories. HBS emphasizes its “focus on real-world practice […] using the case method, which puts students into the role of decision makers every day.” Today, there are more than 76,000 HBS alumni living in 167 countries with nearly 50 percent of alumni working in general management, 23.4 percent in finance and 23 percent in professional services. Famous HBS alumni include...

Should Harvard Business School Hit Refresh?

The institution that required students to carry laptops as early as 1984 and sent graduates to top posts at Hewlett-Packard Co. and Facebook Inc. is not keeping up when it comes to teaching management in a tech-focused era, say students, faculty and alumni. Meanwhile, competitors like Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business and Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management have established themselves as pre-eminent tech-industry feeders, according to the schools’ annual career reports…Read full story: Wall Street...