All MBAs Are Not The Same

It was not that long ago that an executive with an MBA was something of a rarity, marked out as a high-flyer heading for the C-suite. Today an MBA is virtually a prerequisite for anyone wanting to get on in business – but the resulting proliferation in courses and institutions offering them has given them a headache: the tyranny of choice. Now the dilemma facing the ambitious executive is not so much whether to take an MBA, but which one to choose. “If you have want to work in a senior position, an MBA is seen by many people almost a requirement,” says Sean Ennis, director of MBA programs at Strathclyde University in Scotland. “But there is an argument to say that an MBA has been somewhat devalued by the sheer number of schools running it, and some are not worth the paper they’re written on.” This puts a significant emphasis on international rankings. One of the most widely-used is produced by the Financial Times and measures the impact of an MBA on salary. According to the latest ranking an MBA from Harvard Business School, the top-rated, leads to a 96% salary bump, to $179,910. Even among the top 100 ranked MBAs there is considerable variation, with salary uplift ranging from 55% to 160%. But these figures also need to be set in context. Some of the biggest salary increases are associated with business schools in China, where pre-MBA salaries are likely to be lower and graduates more likely to find work overseas on completing their course. Fortunately, would-be students can also compare other indicators including employment rates, career progression and whether alumni would recommend the course. “An MBA does open doors but companies are looking for graduates from...

Why a Harvard MBA is the fastest route to the corner or Oval office...

As a new crop of Harvard Business School students arrive for class this fall, they can expect to bulk up on mandatory first-year fundamentals such as financial reporting, leadership and organizational behavior. Meanwhile, second-year students are offered a wider range of elective courses that reflect the changing times, with increased emphasis on overseas travel, hands-on workshops and case studies on disruptor startups like Buzzfeed. It is “mission critical” to have first-hand experience in emerging markets, Felix Oberholzer-Gee, HBS senior associate dean, told CNBC’s “Power Lunch” this week. “Students must be globalized and diversified,” Oberholzer-Gee said. “We take them out of the classroom for extended periods of time, teach them competitive strategies beyond our borders. It’s imperative for any future leader to be completely global.” Unlike HBS students of five or 10 years ago, the current MBA class is less likely to end up at marquee firms like Goldman Sachs or Google because the tough post-recession job market has led many business-minded grads to eschew traditional jobs, and strike out on their own. Oberholzer-Gee said he thinks that’s not such a bad thing. “Today’s millennial graduates want to skip middle management and take on greater responsibility earlier on in their careers,” said Oberholzer-Gee. “Unknown micro-businesses with relatively shallow hierarchies have become much more attractive.” In 1908, with a faculty of 15 professors and 80 inaugural students, Harvard was the first school to establish a Master of Business Administration program. The program, which today has 936 full-time students and tuition topping $58,875 per year, is widely considered to be the gold standard for business leadership in Wall Street, Silicon Valley and other major economic sectors. It also is often one of the fastest routes to the corner office—or Oval Office—than any...

10 MBA Programs With the Highest Percentage of International Students...

When it comes to earning an MBA, students from across the globe have their sights set on the U.S. In fact, more than half of prospective MBA students from around the world want to study outside of their home country, according to the Graduate Management Admission Council. Among them, the U.S. is a top choice, with 66 percent hoping to gain admission to an American institution. These 10 business schools should give those U.S.-bound students plenty of company. At these 10 schools, an average 63 percent of 2014 MBA-seekers arrived from other countries. That’s compared with an average 33 percent among all 126 ranked schools reporting that figure to U.S. News. Three-quarters of the 156-person student body at the University of California—Riverside were from outside the U.S. – the most of any school reporting data. Syracuse University was close behind, with nearly 70 percent of its 2014 MBA students hailing from beyond the border. Interestingly, U.S. students were the least likely to crave an international MBA, with just 5 percent dreaming of pursuing a business degree abroad, according to GMAC. The following business schools had the highest percentage of full-time international students for fall 2014. Schools designated by U.S. News as Unranked were excluded from this list. U.S. News did not calculate numerical ranks for Unranked programs because they did not meet certain criteria that U.S. News requires. Business school (name) (state) Full-time enrollment (fall 2014) Percentage of international students U.S. News b-school rank University of California— Riverside (Anderson) 156 75% RNP* Syracuse University (Whitman) (NY) 73 69.9% 90 Thunderbird School of Global Management (AZ) 283 67.1% 91 (tie) Hofstra University (Zarb) (NY) 80 66.3% RNP Babson College (Olin) (MA) 378 65.1% 62 University of Delaware (Lerner) 117 61.5%...

How to use an MBA to get a job at Goldman Sachs, JP Morgan, or Morgan Stanley...

It’s not as easy to ‘leverage’ an MBA and end up with a job in an investment bank as it was. These days, banks hire fewer MBAs than they used to, particularly into sales and trading roles. They also seem to be a lot more fussy about who they hire. Having said that, banks are still recruiting MBAs: the 2015 associate class is now in place at most leading US investment banks. Based upon the profiles of those who were hired this year, this is what it takes to convert your Masters in Business Administration into a job at a leading US investment bank now. 1. You’ll need to go to a top school There are plenty of rankings of top MBA courses for banking jobs, so it’s no surprise that the world’s top investment banks like to hire the world’s top MBAs. Rami Rankoussi, a new associate at Goldman Sachs, came from the London Business School. Zachary Upcheshaw, another associate at Goldman, came from Darden. Nancy Jiang, an investment banking associate in the TMT team at J.P. Morgan came from Kellogg. Zichao Du, an investment banking associate at J.P. Morgan in Hong Kong, came from MIT Sloan… 2. You’ll probably need past exposure to finance An MBA is supposed to be a vehicle for a change of career, and you can use the course to re-orientate your role, but most of the associates in our sample had some prior finance experience. Take Kate Lee, a Morgan Stanley associate who took an MBA at the Stephen M. Ross School of Business at the University of Michigan and previously spent five years working as an associate in at Woori Securities and Daiwa Capital Markets. Or take Rankoussi, who was a...