International MBA students

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This section is devoted to issues and information for international MBA students in the US

3 Ways International Students Can Strengthen U.S. MBA Applications...

The U.S. is a popular destination for those from around the globe who want to pursue higher education, and prospective business school students are helping lead the trend of studying in the U.S. Fifty-two percent of prospective students for graduate business programs attempted to study outside their country of citizenship, up from 40 percent in 2010, according to the most recent data from the Graduate Management Admission Council. This growth is seen mostly among Asia-Pacific and Middle Eastern citizens, the report states, and the U.S. is the top region of choice. “Schools want diversity in their programs. You want people from all different places,” says Erin Town, director of MBA admissions at University of Washington’s Foster School of Business. With such a strong interest in U.S. MBA programs from overseas candidates, getting into school is often a competitive process for international applicants. Business school admissions experts offered these three tips to help prospective students improve their chances of getting accepted. 1. Connect with current students: Prospective MBA candidates interested in Foster, which typically has between 30 and 35 percent of full-time MBA students who are international, should try to speak with current students from a similar background, says Town. “If you can talk with someone who’s from your home country and get a feel for their experience here, what they like about the program, how they’re spending their time,” and then mention the conversation in an application, she says, “that really impresses us and shows us they’re very interested in Foster.” When 30-year-old Ting Tseng was applying to business school, speaking with students helped her decide which program to attend. “I talked to several Foster alumni, and they were all very helpful and willing to share,” says Tseng, a...

6 Factors for Prospective International MBA Students to Weigh...

Currently there are more than 450 institutions offering MBA programs in the U.S., with dozens of different concentrations. An MBA degree from an accredited university is one of the most prestigious and recognizable business degrees at the master’s level. Since courses are very diverse and focus on various topics, it offers a wide range of career opportunities. The process of choosing an MBA program can be daunting, especially if you are an international student. Researching your options and getting a grip on what preparations to take is big task. Here are some factors to consider as you start this process to help you make the best decision. 1. Accreditation: It might not be first on your list but it is an important factor: Choose an institution that is accredited. This is a good way to make sure the institution you are researching offers a qualitatively sound program. The number of institutions offering MBA programs is rising, especially online options, but this doesn’t mean that every institution offers you the same value for your money. Since an MBA is a big investment, you want to make sure that you get the best value for your money. Accreditation from the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business International tends to be most prevalent among U.S. programs. 2. Requirements: While looking at various MBA programs you want to get a clear picture of the requirements. What tests do you have to take? Is an essay or an interview a requirement? Will references help your acceptance? Every program has different types of requirements or requires different test scores to be accepted. You want to make sure that you know what to expect and that you take the appropriate amount of time to prepare...

10 MBA Programs With the Highest Percentage of International Students...

When it comes to earning an MBA, students from across the globe have their sights set on the U.S. In fact, more than half of prospective MBA students from around the world want to study outside of their home country, according to the Graduate Management Admission Council. Among them, the U.S. is a top choice, with 66 percent hoping to gain admission to an American institution. These 10 business schools should give those U.S.-bound students plenty of company. At these 10 schools, an average 63 percent of 2014 MBA-seekers arrived from other countries. That’s compared with an average 33 percent among all 126 ranked schools reporting that figure to U.S. News. Three-quarters of the 156-person student body at the University of California—Riverside were from outside the U.S. – the most of any school reporting data. Syracuse University was close behind, with nearly 70 percent of its 2014 MBA students hailing from beyond the border. Interestingly, U.S. students were the least likely to crave an international MBA, with just 5 percent dreaming of pursuing a business degree abroad, according to GMAC. The following business schools had the highest percentage of full-time international students for fall 2014. Schools designated by U.S. News as Unranked were excluded from this list. U.S. News did not calculate numerical ranks for Unranked programs because they did not meet certain criteria that U.S. News requires. Business school (name) (state) Full-time enrollment (fall 2014) Percentage of international students U.S. News b-school rank University of California— Riverside (Anderson) 156 75% RNP* Syracuse University (Whitman) (NY) 73 69.9% 90 Thunderbird School of Global Management (AZ) 283 67.1% 91 (tie) Hofstra University (Zarb) (NY) 80 66.3% RNP Babson College (Olin) (MA) 378 65.1% 62 University of Delaware (Lerner) 117 61.5%...

Overcome Stiff B-School Competition as an International Applicant...

The number of international students applying to MBA programs in the United States has tripled over the last thirty years. Take Harvard Business School for example, the school reports that in 1985 their international bids made up 13% of their application pool. In 2015, the number of international applicants to HBS increased to 34% of the total application to the school. Over the last five to ten years, there has been a notable surge in international applications to MBA programs. This is especially true of candidates from countries such as India, China, and Brazil. India alone has experienced a 24% increase in candidates taking the GMAT in the past five years and Brazil a 37% increase. Since 2010, there has been a 90% increase in the exam being taken in China. We can derive a similar jump was experienced in MBA applications for these countries. MBA programs located in the United States continue to seek top international candidates to bring a truly global mindset to their business schools. However, the competitiveness from this surge has been compounded by a desire from U.S. employers to maintain a significant portion of U.S. citizens and green card holders. This is due to the complications and costs of obtaining visas for foreign students who wish to remain in the U.S. Over the last decade, I have seen and I have personally worked with many international applicants who were successful in the MBA admissions process. In order to achieve the same success, employ some of the following tips. 1. You should differentiate yourself from other applicants from the same region and similar professions. When applying to business school, you are not competing against the entire pool of applicants, instead, you are competing against applicants...

On B-School Test, Americans Fail to Measure Up...

New waves of Indians and Chinese are taking America’s business-school entrance exam, and that’s causing a big problem for America’s prospective M.B.A.s. Why? The foreign students are much better at the test. Asia-Pacific students have shown a mastery of the quantitative portion of the four-part Graduate Management Admission Test. That has skewed mean test scores upward, and vexed U.S. students, whose results are looking increasingly poor in comparison. In response, admissions officers at U.S. schools are seeking new ways of measurement, to make U.S. students look better. Domestic candidates are “banging their heads against the wall,” said Jeremy Shinewald, founder and president of mbaMission, a New York-based M.B.A. admissions-consulting company. While U.S. scores have remained consistent over the past several years, the falling percentiles are “causing a ton of student anxiety,” he said. Since people with near-perfect scores on the test’s math section now make up a significant percentage of all GMAT takers, “the higher you go, the harder it is to get to the next percentile or score,” said 22-year-old Natalie Miller, who eventually plans to apply to the University of Indianapolis School of Business. ENLARGE The GMAT, administered by the Graduate Management Admission Council, is typically required to apply to M.B.A. programs, along with undergraduate transcripts, essay responses and letters of recommendation. Students at top programs like Harvard Business School and Stanford Graduate School of Business have mean GMAT rankings around the 96th percentile. Of the test’s four sections—writing, integrated reasoning, quantitative and verbal—admissions officers view results from the quantitative section as a key predictor of business school success. Percentile rankings are calculated using a raw score—for the quantitative section, typically between 0 and 51. In 2004, a raw score of 48 in the quantitative section yielded...

New Loan Available for International Students Doing Their MBA in the US...

Prodigy Finance has launched a new loan scheme for international students who are doing their MBA in the US. The loans will be available for international students at 15 business schools, including the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, Harvard Business School, and MIT Sloan School of Management, among others. (See a complete list of business schools below.) The loans are capped at the cost of tuition, and can only be used for tuition. Foreign full-time MBA students are eligible to apply, while US citizens and permanent residents are ineligible. Many banks don’t lend to students who are studying internationally. To fill this need, Prodigy Finance uses a “community finance” model, by which alumni help fund loans that are intended for current students. Loan recipients pay interest of between 6 and 12 percent, depending on their profile and current Libor rates, which means that the alumni providing the money receive a return on their investment. Terms vary by business school. Since launching in 2007, Prodigy Finance has distributed around $50 million to some 1,300 students. It provides loan schemes to students doing their MBAs at business schools all over the world, including Germany’s ESMT, France’s HEC Paris, Singapore’s NUS Business School, and the UK’s Oxford University Said Business Schools, among others. In the US pilot program, loans are available for international students doing their MBAs at the following business schools: Carnegie Mellon University – Tepper School of Business Cornell University – Johnson Graduate School of Management Dartmouth College – Tuck School of Business Georgetown University – McDonough School of Business Harvard Business School MIT – Sloan School of Management New York University – Stern School of Business Northwestern University – Kellogg School of Management UCLA – Anderson School...

Study Business Abroad: Great Places for International Students...

Twenty years ago, studying business abroad was only for the adventurous or the downright quirky. Today, it’s increasingly commonplace. Why? Because employers of all sizes are now searching for – and fighting over – the truly international employee: the one who really understands how business is done in key markets around the globe. Those who study abroad while they’re young have international experience before they’ve even reached the workplace. Already ahead of their peers, they’ll be multilingual and have an increased understanding of different cultures. But what is it actually like to study abroad and what is the right location – or locations – for you? How is student life in Ireland different to student life in India, for example? What does a MacBook Pro cost in Australia compared to Austria? How much will a cappuccino set you back in Budapest compared to Beijing? In an effort to access their invaluable advice and experiences, we surveyed students from 29 leading business schools and universities around the world who are part of CEMS, the Global Alliance in Management Education. As part of their Master’s in International Management, the students are required to spend at least one term at a partner school in another country. For every location, we asked local students: What are the three key things you think someone coming to study in your home country should know before they arrive? And we asked visiting students: What are the three key things you wish you had known before you began studying at a school outside your home country? So before you get those visa applications sent off, find the study destination that suits you. Our country by country guide begins here… * You will note that we have not...

Domestic MBA Candidates May Lose Out To Internationals...

Domestic MBA candidates may face missing out on places at some business schools in Europe this year. Candidates from outside a school’s main region are more likely to gain admission to MBA programs, according to a former admissions director at Columbia Business School, while some schools place a cap on domestic candidates, and others defer local candidates for a year to keep their cohorts diverse. Frank Fletcher who is head of recruitment at Belgium’s Vlerick Business School, considered one of the world’s best in the MBA rankings, said that “we enrol a limited number of Dutch students” for its MBA, to keep the class international. Data compiled by the Financial Times based on the MBA class of 2013 show that only 19% of Vlerick’s MBA students are from Belgium. Most European business schools enrol a huge number of international students, compared to the US where there are more domestic students studying for MBA degrees. They argue that this makes a class more “diverse” – increasing learning and employment opportunities. Several European business schools contacted by BusinessBecause said they factor a candidate’s geographical background into their admissions processes, although some said they do not look at this factor in isolation. Humphrey Sopakuwa, an advisor responsible for recruitment at the Netherlands’ Tias Business School, also ranked in the top-100, said that “we receive a lot of applications from certain regions and at one point during the admissions cycle we would probably not consider applications”. According to rankings data, 100% of Tias’ MBA students registered a citizenship which differs from the Netherlands, suggesting the school admitted no domestic students last year…Lea la noticia completa en...

How much will your MBA cost?

The information you need to get a rough estimate The schools’ web-sites and application’s material should give you a very good idea of what to expect to spend for your MBA. Here is a very rough estimate (for the a 2-year full-time program): Min Range Max Range Comment Your Estimate Application $250 $700 Includes: GMAT, TOEFL, Application fees $ Tuition $20,000 $50,000 2 years at $10,000 – $25,000 $ Other Expenses $20 $200 Includes: registration and fees $ Books & Computer $1,000 $5,000 Notice many schools REQUIRE a Laptop $ Living Expenses $22,000 $66,000 Includes: housing, food and transportation (22 months at $1,000 – $3,000) $ Medical Insurance $1,000 $6,000 Notice it is mandatory for foreign students $ Internship ($24,000) $0 Your salary: 3 months at $8,500 – 0 $ Foregone Wages $24,000 $120,000 2 years at 12,000 – 60,000 $ TOTAL $44,270 $247,900 $ Other costs to consider: Traveling from and to your home country, calling your home country, moving expenses (or the cost of buying everything again), winter clothing, interviewing clothing, and so on. As you can see, the total cost of the MBA can vary widely from person to person. It basically depends on: The school you chose. See the different tuition and expenses costs for the top schools. The location. Living in big cities (New York, Chicago, Los Angeles) can make a big difference compared to small towns. Find out about the best places to live in the US, and compare the cost between cities, from Money magazine. Your lifestyle. Your intended lifestyle can make a big difference. Bringing partners (spouses, kids, etc), having a car, living alone or sharing an apartment, are decisions you will need to make. Read full...

Before you leave for the US to get an MBA

What you need to do before you travel Read carefully (and save) the acceptance material sent by the B-School/University. It usually contains most of the information you will need to get settled, including travel information, Visa processing, housing details, and more. It should be your primary source of information. Pay the deposit to ensure your place. Visit the Campus if you didn’t visit it for the interview (and if you can afford it!). The earlier you visit, the better – you might be able to get the most sought after apartments. Many schools invite accepted students for a campus visit – it is very useful for networking, and also a lot of fun! Check the School’s web page regularly – many have a section especially designed for recently admitted students, where you can find plenty of useful and updated information. Talk to your friends, family and colleagues. Let them all know what you are up to, and strive to keep in contact with them. Remember, even if you are planning on working in the US, maintaining a network in your country is extremely important (e.g. you job in the US could be related to your home country). Try leaving your employer in the best terms possible, even if returning to work for them is out of the question. Get your Visa. This is usually pretty straightforward: you provide proof of having funds to cover for tuition and expenses, the University issues an I-20, with it you get your F-1 Visa at your local US Consulate. The Admissions office and/or the University’s International Center should be able to help with any exception and/or problem you might encounter in this process. Carefully plan your trip. A few things to keep in...

Your first weeks in the US for an MBA

Before classes begin Find a place to live – if you have done so, check in at your new house. Sign the lease and move in. Check in with your school and/or International office. There is usually information you need to get, paperwork to fill, and so on. Locate and check in at your country’s nearest consulate. Find them at Foreign Consular Offices in the United States. They are the ones to contact for travel information, emergencies, voting, and so on. Arrange your medical insurance – at the International Office. See Your Health Arrange all the utilities: Power and water – usually just a phone call away. Often arranged by your lanlord. Phone – some local phone companies will want to verify your credit record. Since you probably don’t have one, you will need to fax them a copy of your passport. It will take a couple of days. Cable TV – will usually take a few days (or weeks!). Even more annoying – you have to be there for the installation, and they will tell you the day, but not the exact time they’re coming. Buy furniture and appliances. Before you buy, consider renting (e.g. furniture) and pay a visit to all the garage sales you can. Where to buy: Furniture.com Buy your B-School tools, books and supplies: Palm Pilot: An almost mandatory tool to keep up with contacts, interviews, and so on.   Palm IIIxe Our Price: $249.00 Palm Vx Our Price: $399.00   Computer: Although all B-Schools have big and modern computer laboratories, most students choose to buy one. With current prices, most students can afford it. Many schools now require students to have a notebook, which by the way are very useful. Computer: Dell Computers/Software:...

Your finances during the MBA

Taking care of your money while in the US Personal Finances Resources: Although it may not be very high in your to-do list, taking care of your personal finances is extremely important. The following sites should help: Understanding and Controlling Your Finances, by Marshall Brain Quicken.com The Money section at Edupass.org Financial Aid: Although limited for international students, new programs and opportunities are emerging to finance your MBA. Make sure you check regularly the Financing your MBA section and you keep in touch with the Financial aid person at your school. Keep in mind that new financing opportunities arise frequently when a country or region is going through a financial crisis. The checking account: The checking account and its ATM/Debit card are the center of your finances. Keep the following in mind: Consider online banking at Compubank. Online banking is convenient, safe and inexpensive. Other online banks include Net.B@nk. Check Gomez Advisor’s on-line Banking ranking If you still prefer old fashiones banking, choose a well known bank (FDIC insured), with a branch near the School or near home. Find an account offering automatic payments. This feature will let you pay your bills online, directly from your account, simplifying your finances significantly. Learn everything you need about banking @ bankrate.com Building credit: Credit is extremely important in the US, especially for young professionals.If you decide to stay in this country, you will need it for everything from financing your consumer spending (credit cards) to buying a car and a home. It is a must to build and keep a good credit standing. Once you get your social security number, every transaction involving some sort of credit will be monitored by credit bureaus. To build credit: start with a credit card...