Best MBA Programs In Europe – The Ranking Of MBA Rankings...

Following on from the Fortuna Ranking of MBA Rankings for the top U.S. schools, here is the league table for European business schools, looking at their 2017 standing across the four major MBA rankings. The results provide a valuable snapshot of performance as measured by the different methodologies used by Forbes, the Financial Times, The Economist, and Bloomberg BusinessWeek. But before we get to those results, and their potential impact on deciding where to apply for your MBA, there are three fundamental questions to ask yourself as you start your research to find the right business school for you. The answer to the first question is highly personal, but the answers to the second and third questions are slowly redefining the business education landscape. 1. Why do you want to go to business school? This first question features in many MBA applications, and there is no one right answer. Whether to make a career switch, accelerate your earnings, build your international credentials, learn new skills, expand your network, or simply enjoy a wonderful study experience, the professional, financial and personal rewards of studying at one of the world’s top business schools are compelling. My co-director at Fortuna Admissions, Caroline Diarte Edwards, reviewed many thousands of applications during her seven years as Director of Admissions at INSEAD. She observes that the one key action to dramatically improve your MBA application is to spend a considerable amount of time on self-reflection – no matter where you are in the process. “The admissions office doesn’t just want to hear about your academic excellence and professional experiences. They want to know who you truly are and what motivates you. And that includes insights on why you really want to do an MBA.” 2....

9 phrases only MBAs understand

Every industry has its own lingo. Business-school jargon may be especially perplexing to outsiders. To help clear up some of the confusion, we asked two MBA grads about the most unusual terms and phrases they picked up in business school. Paul Ollinger graduated from the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth in 1997 and was an early Facebook employee before becoming a standup comedian. He recently published a comedic career guide titled, “You Should Totally Get an MBA,” which includes a glossary of “MBA Talk.” Alex Dea graduated from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill’s Kenan-Flagler Business School in 2015 and is now a product marketing manager at Salesforce. He also runs the blog MBASchooled, which is a resource for business school students, applicants, and alumni.   Resume walk The “resume walk” is a high-level review of your resume during an interview. Dea said: “It’s almost like a very short, succinct elevator pitch about your background or what you’ve done, the skills that you have, anything that gleans a little bit into how your personal and professional life connect.”   PAR and STAR These are two frameworks that MBA students use either to describe their accomplishments on a resume or to answer interview questions, Dea said. “You don’t always get a lot of time for interviews, so you want to make sure that you’re being concise.” PAR stands for “Problem, Action, Result.” If you’re using this format, Dea said, “you would talk about the problem, then you would dig into the actions that you took to help solve the problem, and then you would finally close with the end result that you specifically made.” STAR is very similar — it stands for “Situation, Task, Action, Result.”  ...