42% Of CEOs At Top Fortune 100 Firms Have MBA Degrees...

Business school may be your ticket to the boardroom. More than 40% of the chief executive officers in the top 100 Fortune companies have studied for an MBA, according to research from Heidrick & Struggles, the executive search firm. In the UK, 27% of the top chief executives opted for an MBA degree; 24% in France. The data show that studying at an elite business school could be your best bet for becoming a CEO. Around 50% of the chief executives of SBF 120 companies, the index of France’s 120 largest firms, graduated from one of four top schools: INSEAD, HEC Paris, École nationale d’administration or École Polytechnique. INSEAD, which has campuses in France, Singapore and Abu Dhabi, has several prominent CEOs. These include Tidjane Thiam at Swiss investment bank Credit Suisse; Helge Lund of oil major BG Group; and António Horta-Osório of UK lender Lloyds Banking Group. HEC Paris’ star alumni include Jean-Paul Agon, CEO of cosmetics group L’Oréal; François-Henri Pinault, the chief executive of luxury brand Kering; and Bruno Lafont, industrial champion Lafarge’s chief. In the US, 28% of the Fortune 100 chiefs graduated from seven top universities: Harvard, Stanford, Pennsylvania, Berkeley, Columbia, MIT, and Princeton. Harvard Business School has seven CEOs at top European companies alone. These include Vittorio Colao at telecoms group Vodafone, and Sir Martin Sorrell of WPP, the world’s largest advertising group. Columbia’s CEO alumni are James Gorman, at US bank Morgan Stanley, and César Alierta, at telecoms group Telefónica, among others. Stanford counts Carlos Brito, CEO of brewer Anheuser-Busch InBev, as alumni. Berkeley graduated Joseph Jimenez, the chief of pharma group Novartis, and Shantanu Narayen, head at software company Adobe. Meanwhile, 24% of the UK’s FTSE 100 CEOs graduated from either Oxford...

Morgan Stanley pays MBAs the most

Business school is a profitable investment for almost anyone, but some MBAs are getting more dollar value out of their degrees than others. MBAs who worked in financial services several years out of school earned more than their peers in every other industry, and the best paychecks overall were doled out by investment banking firm Morgan Stanley, a Bloomberg survey of thousands of B-School alumni showed. Bloomberg News reports that as part of our annual ranking of business schools, Bloomberg surveyed 12,773 professionals six to eight years after they graduated from business school. The MBAs who work at Morgan Stanley took home the largest compensation packages, followed closely by alums at Goldman Sachs. Bloomberg asked alumni who graduated from 2007 through 2009 about their current employer, base salary, and bonus. To figure out who pays the most, we focused on companies where we polled at least 20 MBAs. Graduates working in finance – which includes people in accounting and banking – took home a median $210,000. Read full story:...

Perfect GMAT won’t help you get into this B school...

It’s not even November and Harvard has already denied students acceptance to its MBA program. While it comes as no surprise that about 89 out of every 100 applicants are turned down for admission to Harvard Business School, the true shock is that many of the first round “dings” made by HBS happen to impressive candidates. According to the business education website, Poets & Quants, around 60 out of those 89 candidates refused admission are highly qualified students who have stellar GMAT scores and extracurricular activities. The site revealed the profiles of candidates who were rejected before the notoriously competitive, first round of admission interviews. Three out of the applicants who submitted their profiles have “nosebleed-territory” GMAT scores of 780, which would put them in the 99th percentile of test takers in the world. They also boast near-perfect GPAs with extensive accomplishments and professional experience. One of the candidates rejected without an interview listed that he is a Stanford University graduate who manages a strategy team for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. “This case surprises me because not only are the statistics for this person very high, but he is also a rare case of a candidate in the aerospace industry,” said Sanford Kreisberg, founder of HBSGuru.com and an admissions consultant who specializes in Harvard MBA applications. “Aerospace is a recognized, if not beloved, industry at Harvard Business School.” In this instance, Kreisberg speculated that there are several reasons the student was eliminated from the first round of interviews such as a poor written application or an admissions board mistake. Still, Kreisberg explained that with an admissions rate of about 11 percent, Harvard rejects a lot of candidates with high test scores because HBS is looking to build a class...

13 Tips From MBA Students On How To Succeed In A Top-Tier Program...

MBA students spend months if not years working to get into an MBA program. However, once they are in a program, the everyday demands take over and students have little time to think about how to get the most out of their program. To better understand how to hit the ground running and to make sure you maximize success in your MBA program, we turned to recent and current students of top-tier MBA programs for advice. Tip #1: Focus on Career Experimentation Alex Haddock, Darden School of Business (University of Virginia), Interned at Goldman Sachs Alex Haddock, a rising Second Year at Darden, suggests that you go beyond the career exploration offered through recruiting. During the recruiting process, you will have access to top companies that will try to give you a sense of what it’s like to work in different fields and functions. However, business school offers many other opportunities to learn about new roles and industries – and the chance to actually use and experiment with the skills required in a variety of roles. Classes, clubs and extracurricular experiences will let you engage in real consulting, marketing and entrepreneurial engagements, just to name a few. During his first year, Alex was able to help a local company organize its accounting records, work with a public school to streamline its planning processes, and compete in a start-up pitch competition. If you take advantage of the resources at your school, you can leave after two years already having lived the roles of marketer, banker, consultant and more. Then you can make the best decision about your career path and your future. Tip #2: Make the Most of the MBA “Card” David Newsome, Sloan School of Management (Massachusetts Institute of...

The Companies That Pay MBAs the Most

Business school is a profitable investment for almost anyone, but some MBAs are getting more dollar value out of their degrees than others. MBAs who worked in financial services several years out of school earned more than their peers in every other industry, and the best paychecks overall were doled out by investment banking firm Morgan Stanley, a Bloomberg survey of thousands of B-School alumni showed. As part of our annual ranking of business schools, Bloomberg surveyed 12,773 professionals six to eight years after they graduated from business school. The MBAs who work at Morgan Stanley took home the largest compensation packages, followed closely by alums at Goldman Sachs. We asked alumni who graduated from 2007 through 2009 about their current employer, base salary, and bonus. To figure out who pays the most, we focused on companies where we polled at least 20 MBAs. Graduates working in finance–which includes people in accounting and banking–took home a median $210,000. Real estate and energy were the next most lucrative industries. Perhaps the unlikeliest leader of the pack was agriculture, where MBAs made a median of $180,000—as much as they earned in consulting. (About 46 percent of the alumni we surveyed went into finance, tech, or consulting, while 8.5 percent worked in energy, real estate, or agriculture.) The companies that paid MBAs the most hailed mainly from the professions that have long been catnip for MBAs. Five of the 10 companies that paid MBAs the most were financial businesses and three were consulting firms. The only Silicon Valley representatives that made their way into the top 10 were Google and Apple. Even at those tech giants, MBAs earned 36 percent less than their peers at Morgan Stanley, mainly because they hauled in...

Looking for an Education Bargain? University Offers Tuition-Free MBA...

Getting a master’s degree in business administration can catapult your career. It can also saddle you with serious debt. But students entering Arizona State University’s MBA program in 2016 won’t have to worry about those pesky tuition costs: They’ll get the advanced degree for free. The W.P. Carey business school at ASU has announced a scholarship for “exceptional full-time MBA candidates who exhibit creativity, ingenuity and innate leadership” that will essentially give the entire class a free ride. The business school says it’s hoping to draw a class that’s more economically and demographically diverse. “MBA programs do not have the same type of diversity that you see in undergraduate programs,” said Amy Hillman, dean of the business school. While nearly half of her business undergraduate students are female, “the number drops off precipitously when you think about having to go out into the workforce for another five years, and then quitting and coming back after a two-year full-time MBA,” she said. Image: W.P. Carey business school at Arizona State University The W.P. Carey business school at ASU has announced a scholarship for “exceptional full-time MBA candidates who exhibit creativity, ingenuity and innate leadership” that will essentially give the entire class a free ride. W. P. Carey School of Business The free degree is courtesy of an endowment made by from businessman William Polk Carey in 2003. Until now it had been used to hire faculty, said Hillman. This year ASU’s full-time MBA enrolled 86 students, up from 70 last year, who paid $54,000 in tuition if they were Arizona residents, $87,000 if they moved to the state from elsewhere in the U.S. to go to school and $90,000 if they came from other countries. Hillman said the school is...

The Top Business Schools for Networking

Online graduate school guide graduateprograms.com has published its list of the top 25 business schools for networking. Over 13,000 business school students and alumni were surveyed and asked to rank their schools’ network quality on a scale of one to 10. Networking is amongst the foremost components of professional life. For MBAs, a business school is a networking nirvana; a melting pot of aspiring business leaders, experts and entrepreneurs providing an endless pool of potential partners, colleagues, employers and employees. Stanford GSB took first position with a network quality of 9.90. Columbia and Harvard made up the top three. INSEAD came close behind in fourth position with 9.75; its Fontainebleau campus the chief networking hub in Europe. With the rankings dominated by US schools, INSEAD along with London Business School in ninth fly the flag for Europe. Making up the rest of the top ten are Texas A&M University and Chicago’s Booth School in joint fifth; the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill in seventh; the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School in eighth; and Cornell University: Johnson in tenth. Exposure to a strong network of business professionals is crucial for an MBA’s future career development. MBA applicants choosing and comparing business schools will always have networking opportunities at the forefront of their minds. The top business schools for networking boast an impressive array of high-level alumni. Stanford’s influential MBA alumni include the CEO of eBay, John Donahoe, and the chief executive of General Motors, Mary Barra. Harvard yields an impressive amount of top CEOs including the CEO of JPMorgan Chase, Jamie Dimon, and the CEO of General Electric, Jeffrey Immelt. INSEAD is also a breeding ground for successful professionals, including the CEO of Lloyds Banking Group, Antonio Horta-Osorio,...