B-Schools Europe

Brexit Could Cost MBA Jobs And Business School Applications...

UK’s business schools have been left reeling from the nation’s exit from the EU, with applications, jobs prospects and research funding now potentially at risk. Brexit threatens to harm the UK’s standing as a hub for elite universities, and Friday’s referendum result has placed the nation’s entire higher education sector into a period of uncertainty. Andrew Likierman, dean of London Business School, says: “Speaking personally, I am concerned at the implications of the result for the UK.” The UK is home to 14 of Europe’s top-ranked business schools by the FT. UK schools rely on their global standing to attract talent. But there are growing fears that the UK’s anti-EU sentiment will affect universities’ ability to recruit applicants. The proportion of British students in UK MBA programs has fallen from 58% in 2007-2008 to just 49% today, according to the Higher Education Statistics Agency. Brexit could not only turn potential students sour on the UK’s schools, but could also make it more difficult for schools to recruit faculty. For instance, 60% of Oxford University’s Saïd Business School professors are from outside the UK. Saïd did not respond to a request for comment. Ian Looker, education lead partner at PwC, says: “Not only is the research funding provided by the EU now at threat, but also the potential tighter controls over EU staff and students coming to the UK could well present UK universities as less attractive options to work and study.” LBS’ Andrew says: “For higher education as a whole, and London Business School in particular, this should not give the signal that the UK has turned inwards. We are a global school and I believe that the UK will remain an outstandingly attractive place to study.” Brexit could...

Insead tops ‘Financial Times’ MBA rankings...

Insead, the business school with campuses in France, Singapore and Abu Dhabi, has topped the Financial Times’ Global MBA rankings for the first time since they were introduced in 1999. This is the first time that an MBA programme with a substantial Asian presence has been ranked number one by the Financial Times , and marks a growing interest from elite students in Asian business and business schools. Insead is still the only top-ranked business school to teach its full-time MBA on multiple campuses, with 75 per cent of the 1,000 students studying in Singapore or in Fontainebleau, just outside Paris. It is also the first time a one-year MBA programme has been ranked in the top slot. The flagship MBA programmes of the four previous winners – Harvard Business School, Stanford GSB and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in the US, and London Business School in the UK – are all two-year degrees. These schools have been ranked in the top five slots along with Insead for the past three years by the FT. The full-time MBA programme at UCD Michael Smurfit Graduate Business School has been ranked 79th in the world and 24th in Europe in the survey. The school had been ranked 73rd in the 2015 rankings. The Insead MBA was the world’s first one-year programme when it began in 1959, though many others have followed. As the cost of studying for an MBA has steadily risen, many students are wary of taking on the debt associated with two-year degrees – students are frequently more than $100,000 in debt when they graduate. Though fees and living costs can be substantial, it is often the opportunity cost of lost salary that is the biggest...

The 19 best-value MBAs from Europe’s elite business schools...

Europe has some of the best business schools in the world, and the graduates getting MBAs often see their salaries explode in the years after graduation. But which are the most financially worthwhile for the students attending? How quickly can they make back the money they spend on the MBA after they finish? We took the recently published tuition-fee data from the QS/Top MBA global rankings, and used the top 25 European institutions in the ranks as the elite schools. We also looked at the salary data from the Financial Times’ 2014 European Business Schools rankings. The FT looks at the salary of graduates of each school’s MBA programme three years after graduation, compared to salaries before the course began. Nineteen of the 25 best Top MBA schools were covered by the FT. With this, we worked out what proportion of the total fees you could have paid off with the salary increase you saw over the three years after you finished the course. Of course, that salary increase can’t all be put down to the school, but it’s a good gauge of how quickly graduates are able to recoup the cost of the fees. 18. Imperial Business School: Salary gains pay for 64% of fees in three years. Salary three years after graduation: $103,604 Salary gain in percentage terms: 68% Salary gain in nominal terms: $41,935 Initial MBA fees: $65,691 MBA ranking (Top MBA): 22nd London-based Imperial Business School comes in at No. 9 for the most affordable MBAs in the UK alone. With the increase in salaries seen three years after getting an MBA at Imperial, the average holder could pay for 64% of his or her total tuition fees. 17. University of St. Gallen Business School:...

The cost of an MBA in Europe has plummeted, thanks to a strong dollar...

A strong U.S. dollar has discounted the price of a European MBA and led, officials say, to increased interest from American students. Add one more upside to the European MBA for U.S. students. Already, MBA programs in Europe offer an advantage to many students in their typical one-year length, cutting tuition along with opportunity costs. And the top European B-schools tend to accept higher percentages of applicants with lower GMAT scores than highly ranked U.S. schools. Over the past year, the strength of the U.S. dollar versus the euro has drastically discounted the price of a European international MBA, and led, school officials say, to increased interest from American would-be MBAs. The euro has plunged from a high of around 1.4 dollars per euro in May 2014 to 1.1 now, making it 21% cheaper for students who use dollars to pay European MBA tuition. INSEAD’s current tuition of 65,800 euros costs $71,557 in dollars – but if the euro hadn’t fallen since this time last year, that price would have been $89,488. Of course, the true savings are even greater when you add in the estimated living expenses of 23,800 euros that come with getting an MBA on INSEAD’s Fontainebleau campus in France. That’s $7,140 less expensive than only a year ago. The price differential is less consequential for U.S. students who enroll at schools in Britain. That’s because the United Kingdom government never adopted the euro and kept its own currency, the pound sterling, which hasn’t suffered as significant a fall against the U.S. dollar in the past year. The price break is less than half in the U.K., at 9.8%. At London Business School, for example, tuition for a student starting in its two-year MBA program this...

Be a Standout U.S. Applicant for European MBA Programs...

Prospective MBA students who want to get their degrees quickly can apply to one-year, domestic MBA programs, which are a growing offering in the U.S. But if they want the same quick experience, while also getting a global perspective, an MBA overseas may be a better option. European schools typically offer full-time programs that are shorter than two years, experts say. And applicants who choose one of these programs may not have to worry about being the lone North American transplant in class. In 2014, 35 percent of full-time, one-year European MBA schools saw an increase in foreign applicants, according to a report from the Graduate Management Admission Council. The hardships that come with getting into top-ranked U.S. business schools may be encouraging some applicants to look abroad, says Kaneisha Grayson, who runs The Art of Applying, an admissions consulting company. “Students are getting weary of the sheer competitiveness,” says Grayson, who graduated from Harvard Business School. While MBA programs in Europe can certainly be tough to get into, she says, some U.S. students might be able to sell themselves better with international schools…Read full story: U.S. News & World...

Decide Between a Top U.S., Global MBA Program

Sometimes there are decisions in life you don’t want to complain about: Whether to vacation in the Bahamas or the Florida Keys, for example, or whether to buy a Mercedes or a Lexus. Sure, life could be worse. But that doesn’t make the decision any less anxiety-inducing. Students who get into the top MBA programs in the world find themselves in a similar predicament. Do they want to rub shoulders with Wall Street types at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School or make international connections over croissants at France’s INSEAD Business School? The top MBA programs on either side of the Atlantic differ in various ways, experts say. And prospective students should consider a variety of factors before they choose a top U.S. MBA program or an equally well-regarded program in Europe or beyond. The first thing students should consider when choosing between a top-tier U.S. or non-U.S. MBA program are the academic components, says Rachel Beck, a senior consultant at mbaMission, an MBA admissions consulting firm. While some programs have a general focus, others are known for their specialties. She suggests prospective students go through course catalogs to make sure they find a roster of classes of interest. Students should also think about what industry they would like to be in, and whether their school has connections to that field. Applicants drawn to business innovation and startup culture may be good fits for the graduate business programs at schools such as Stanford University, University of California—Berkeley and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, says Matt Symonds, co-director of the MBA admissions consulting firm Fortuna Admissions. At the same time, students hoping to enter careers in private equity may want to choose a program at places like Wharton, Columbia University or...

The best and worst MBA courses if you want a giant salary...

An MBA is not just about getting paid. It’s also about pushing your learning curve, widening your networking parameters and leveraging up some love among the case studies. But money is part of an MBA – why else would you fork out tens of thousands in tuition fees and living expenses if you weren’t expecting to to earn a lot of money at the end of it. If money is indeed part of your MBA decision matrix, the Financial Times’ new ranking of European Business Schools should come in helpful. It clarifies which MBA courses will transform your earning power and which won’t. If you want to earn more than $140k (£89k) after you graduate, there are only six elite schools in Europe to choose between. They are: London Business School ($157k), INSEAD ($148k), IE Business School ($147k), Judge Business School at the University of Cambridge ($144k), Iese Business School in Spain ($143k) and IMD Business School in Switzerland ($142k). Conversely, if you’re not too bothered about earning money at the end of your MBA, you might want to try University of Liverpool Management School, where you’ll earn $57.8k upon graduation. Or there’s Neoma Business School in Rouen, where the average graduating MBA salary is $64.4k. Or Politecnico di Milano School of Management – average starting salary $67k. The silver lining is that the MBA courses which don’t generate giant incomes upon graduation are priced accordingly. At Neoma, the MBA costs a mere €30.5k ($38k), while a Liverpool MBA costs a mere £13k (£20.5k). This compares to fees of £64k at the London Business School ($100k) and €62.5k ($78k) at INSEAD…Read full story:...

4 Factors to Consider About European MBA Programs...

As business becomes more global, future MBA applicants may ask themselves if they should consider heading abroad for business school. In many cases, the answer will be yes. The best business schools attract international students and faculty of the highest caliber, and in terms of rankings, elite European programs perform as well as many top programs in the U.S. According to the latest top MBA salary and job trends report, international study experience is sought by 67 percent of MBA employers, and recruiters “most significantly agree that candidates with international experience outperform those without.” There are four factors you should weigh to determine if a European business school is a better fit to help you reach your career goals. [See the Best Global Universities for studying economics and business.] 1. Global networking options: If you want to build a global network in a multicultural environment, then apply to schools that can help you fulfill those goals. While MBA programs at Harvard Business School and Stanford Graduate School of Business have sterling reputations worldwide, just 17 percent of 2013 HBS grads and 13 percent of 2014 Stanford MBA grads found work abroad after graduation. If you know you want to work in Europe, you’d be better off choosing a local school where you can network directly with employers. 2. Greater classroom diversity: The top programs in Europe tend to be much more internationally oriented, with 96 percent of the class coming from outside the country​ at some schools. Think about how that culturally diverse mix enriches class discussions, as well as creates networking opportunities that span the globe. There is one caveat to the diversity of top European programs: They typically enroll fewer women compared with U.S. business schools. For...

Domestic MBA Candidates May Lose Out To Internationals...

Domestic MBA candidates may face missing out on places at some business schools in Europe this year. Candidates from outside a school’s main region are more likely to gain admission to MBA programs, according to a former admissions director at Columbia Business School, while some schools place a cap on domestic candidates, and others defer local candidates for a year to keep their cohorts diverse. Frank Fletcher who is head of recruitment at Belgium’s Vlerick Business School, considered one of the world’s best in the MBA rankings, said that “we enrol a limited number of Dutch students” for its MBA, to keep the class international. Data compiled by the Financial Times based on the MBA class of 2013 show that only 19% of Vlerick’s MBA students are from Belgium. Most European business schools enrol a huge number of international students, compared to the US where there are more domestic students studying for MBA degrees. They argue that this makes a class more “diverse” – increasing learning and employment opportunities. Several European business schools contacted by BusinessBecause said they factor a candidate’s geographical background into their admissions processes, although some said they do not look at this factor in isolation. Humphrey Sopakuwa, an advisor responsible for recruitment at the Netherlands’ Tias Business School, also ranked in the top-100, said that “we receive a lot of applications from certain regions and at one point during the admissions cycle we would probably not consider applications”. According to rankings data, 100% of Tias’ MBA students registered a citizenship which differs from the Netherlands, suggesting the school admitted no domestic students last year…Lea la noticia completa en...

Europeans Opting for MBAs Closer to Home

B-school-bound Europeans are increasingly applying to MBA programs on the Continent, which are shorter and cheaper than their U.S. counterparts Scottish business school student Steven Renwick used to harbor what he called a “vague aspiration” to get his MBA from an American institution such as the Stanford Graduate School of Business. Then he took a closer look at the price tag. The cost of a two-year degree at a top U.S. business school would easily set him back more than $150,000, an investment of time and money he was not comfortable making. Says Renwick: “It seemed like a massive opportunity cost.” Instead, he considered schools in Europe with one-year MBA programs, such as Switzerland’s IMD (IMD Full-Time MBA Profile), France’s INSEAD (INSEAD Full-Time MBA Profile) and the University of Oxford’s Saïd Business School (Saïd Full-Time MBA Profile). He ultimately applied to and was accepted by Saïd, a school known for its strong entrepreneurship offerings, with a more affordable tuition of about $57,000. “I was always very aware of U.S. business schools because they were so highly ranked, but they just seemed astronomically expensive to me,” says Renwick, who is now at Saïd working on launching an Internet startup. “I didn’t see the advantage of getting myself into that much debt before even going into business.” Renwick is part of a new generation of European MBA students who are increasingly looking to attend business schools on their home continent, rather than going abroad to the U.S. for their business school education. In the past five years, the number of Europeans who are sending their Graduate Management Admission Test (GMAT) scores to U.S. schools has declined sharply, according to a report released this month by the Graduate Management Admission Council on...

British Business School Offers M.B.A. Courses on Facebook...

Facebook has changed the way students, faculty members, and administrators communicate outside the classroom. Now, with the introduction of the London School of Business & Finance’s Global MBA Facebook app, Facebook is becoming the classroom The Global MBA app”introduced in October”lets users sample typical business-school courses like corporate finance and organizational behavior through the social-networking site. The free course material includes interactive message boards, a note-taking tool, and video lectures and discussions with insiders from industry giants like Accenture Management Consulting and Deloitte. This may be a good way to market a school, notes an observer from a business-school accrediting organization, but it may not be the best way to deliver courses. Unlike most online business courses, the Global MBA program will not require students to pay an enrollment fee up front. Instead, students can access basic course material free of charge and pay the school only when they are ready to prepare for their exams. School administrators hope that letting students “test drive” the online courses before actually shelling out the tuition money will boost graduation rates. While the school offers a large collection of study material on Facebook”including 80 hours of Web video”students seeking formal accreditation must qualify for entrance into the M.B.A. program. Once enrolled in the paid course, students are given access to additional content on the business school’s InterActive course management system, and are required to sit for examinations”like they would if they were enrolled in more traditional distance-learning or brick-and-mortar programs. The Facebook MBA program is accredited by the University of Wales and costs a total of £14,500″about $22,000. Steve Parscale, director of accreditation for the Kansas-based Accreditation Council for Business Schools & Programs, said sample classes offered through social-networking sites could provide...