Executive MBA

If you don’t have 1-2 years to invest in an MBA, consider executive education. Designed for busy executives, they provide condensed but excellent business education.There are two different types:Executive Education short practical courses in areas like Financial Management, Strategic Marketing, and so on. They do not grant an MBA degree.Executive MBA a condensed MBA, usually about 20 weeks long, covering the same broad areas as a full-time MBA

Why part-time MBAs are undervalued

Three cheers for the part-time MBA! It is not a refrain you are likely to hear every day, I have to admit. But why does the full-time MBA receive all the accolades while part-time programmes are met with a rather embarrassed silence, even though the degree received by graduates is often the same? This might seem an odd thing to write about in a magazine dedicated to the full-time degree, but I think it is worth asking the question. Why has the part-time MBA always been the Cinderella of the MBA market, and can and should that change? It strikes me there is a real case to answer here. For what everyone has learnt in the past decade is that the MBA market has to offer more flexibility to students; it has to make better use of technology; it has to be more affordable; and participants need the security of a job at the end of the process. A further point is that there are too few women on traditional MBA programmes, and there is evidence that part-time programmes might help redress that balance. But the one thing that has convinced me the part-time MBA should be revisited is a comment I heard some years ago from Kim Clark, the former dean of Harvard Business School, whose MBA is ranked number one in the world by the FT this year. He said that students do not turn down a seat at HBS to go to another business school; they do so because they have great opportunities at work. As economies recover around the world, this is clearly going to become a bigger problem, as corporations bid to retain talented staff. They may even be persuaded to sponsor part-time MBA...

Slight Decline in Number of Self-Funded Executive MBA Students...

For the first time in five years, the percentage of students who fully fund their Executive MBA (EMBA) education has declined slightly, according to the results of the 2014 Membership Program Survey of the Executive MBA Council (EMBAC). “With organizations facing challenging economic times and accordingly changing their tuition reimbursement policies, we’ve seen the responsibility for financing the degree fall more on students. Even so, business leaders continue to see the value of the EMBA experience.” The percentage of self-funded students decreased from 41.2 percent in 2013 to 39.8 percent in 2014. Partial sponsorship also increased from 34.7 percent in 2013 to 35.6 percent in 2014, with full sponsorship also increasing from 24 percent in 2013 to 24.6 percent in 2014. “While this is encouraging, time will tell if it becomes a trend,” says Michael Desiderio, EMBAC executive director. “With organizations facing challenging economic times and accordingly changing their tuition reimbursement policies, we’ve seen the responsibility for financing the degree fall more on students. Even so, business leaders continue to see the value of the EMBA experience.” In addition, 53 percent of programs offered scholarships and fellowships. Total program costs rose by approximately 2 percent from $73,401 in 2013 to $74,883 in 2014. EMBAC sponsors its Membership Program Survey each year to help track industry developments. In 2014, 285 member programs throughout the world – or 92 percent – participated in the survey. Survey data also offered the following highlights: Consistent Demographics • In 2014, the percentage of women in EMBA programs remained consistent at 25.4 percent. In the past five years, the percentage has ranged from a high of 26.7 percent 2012 to a low of 25.2 percent in 2011. • The average EMBA student age is 37.5...

University of Miami to Launch MBA Program for Professional Artists, Athletes...

The university’s School of Business Administration has developed the Miami Executive MBA for Professional Artists and Athletes, which begins in February 2015. The program will teach these accomplished individuals, many of whom have strong personal brands, how to leverage their current career success into business and social achievement. Because the program is expected to draw many players from the National Football League (NFL), classes will be held during the league’s off-season. The 18-month program consists of six two-week residency modules at the School’s main campus in Coral Gables. The program, which will be taught by the same world-class faculty who teach in the School’s other programs, has the same curriculum as the School’s existing Global Executive MBA program, which meets on a similar schedule. “The Miami Executive MBA for Professional Artists and Athletes will equip current and former NFL players, as well as other athletes and artists, with the new knowledge and business skills they need to continue their personal and professional success,” Gene Anderson, dean of the University of Miami ‘s School of Business Administration, said in a statement. “Like all of our Executive MBA programs, this specialized program is designed to help participants become successful managers and leaders in the business world.” The Miami Executive MBA for Professional Artists and Athletes adds another customized program to the School’s unique MBA offerings. The university’s School of Business Administration also offers the Miami Executive MBA for the Americas program, designed for those engaged in the business of the Americas; the Executive MBA in Health Sector Management and Policy program, designed for health care industry professionals; and the Spanish-language Global Executive MBA program, designed for Spanish-speaking executives in Latin America, among the School’s other MBA programs. Read full story: University...

Jack Welch on the executive MBA he created in his own image...

In 2009, he eschewed full-time retirement at his Florida home to set up the Jack Welch Management Institute, with a view to rolling out the next generation of Jack Welches. His name is upfront and he is proud of it. “It’s mine. I can design the faculty. I can select the dean. I can control the product.” Nor does the marketing slogan for his executive MBA pull its punches: “Most MBA programmes study great leaders. Ours is taught by one,” it reads. Sitting in his central Manhattan apartment, which has some of the best views of New York that money can buy, Welch counters the notion that becoming a business professor is a reinvention. “I’ve spent 20 years at GE teaching. I taught every month. Then I taught at MIT [Sloan School of Management] for five years,” he begins. “I love the process – I’ve been hooked on it for 35 years.” In truth, Welch, who has lost little of the penetrating stare of his GE days, displays an enthusiasm for the subject of education that few business school professors can muster. But the man known for his pugnacity holds little truck with the scale, the focus and the business model of the traditional business school. The traditional MBA, he says, is “a gracious way to change jobs because you made a mistake the first time”. And business schools are inefficient. “I just saw overheads everywhere and I saw the cost of tuition racing ahead as these overheads built up.” Yet he insists that the online Jack Welch EMBA is not competing directly with the elite MBA programmes. “We are not that system; this is not us versus them,” he says. Instead, it is all a matter of scale....

Don’t Try to Solve Your Mid-Career Crisis With an Executive MBA...

Most people in full-time MBA programs are there because they expect a significant salary jump from their next job. Business schools advertise the return on investment their students can expect. Websites aimed at applicants offer ROI calculators. Some B-school rankings award extra points for schools that net their alumni big post-MBA salaries. (Bloomberg Businessweek’s MBA rankings don’t factor in salary outcomes.) The executive MBA is different. It’s not just a way to move up the pay scale. Employers, who often support EMBA candidates either by paying their managers’ tuitions or offering them time off, do expect a return on their considerable investment—just one that’s not measured only in dollars. Individuals and organizations want to transform themselves in an increasingly competitive market. Cultivating executives who can help them do that is far more valuable than producing managers who make for the next raise. Companies want their EMBAs to bring fresh insights back to the job, and to be confident and thoughtful enough to make difficult decisions. Keeping this expertise within the corporation is extraordinarily valuable. Last year, during our Oxford EMBA program in India, for example, an American student spent a free afternoon recruiting potential staff for their employer from a Bangalore IT firm. Class peers gave him insight into the local job market and how to recruit the best team. He returned home, mission accomplished…Lea la noticia completa en...

Future of the executive education: Unbundled MBA...

In a quarter of a century, most business students will never enter a classroom. The faculty lectures, the MBA student discussions and the homework assignments will occur instead over the Internet, where each part of the educational experience can be played as many times as it takes to fully absorb or satisfy, as if it were a Seinfeld rerun. The world’s most famous professors will more likely be compelling teachers—rather than journal-published researchers—and many of them will be free agents, unattached to a single university. Technology will allow for free-agent faculty, able to teach directly to students, with the university being what it will increasingly be viewed as: just another middleman taking a profit. Professors won’t need an affiliation with a university, because technology will allow them to create their own brands. The costs of academic learning will plummet. And much of education will be modular in nature. Students will pick and choose from the best professors and the best colleges and universities worldwide to construct a degree of choice. There will be little need to go to one school for several years and sit in classrooms with other students. The greatest asset universities now hold—the ability to grant a degree—will have so greatly diminished in value that it will become little more than a quant notion for the learned. A doomsday scenario? A doomsday scenario for business education? Not really. The nominal purpose of a business school is for academic learning. But as learning becomes increasingly available online, it’s likely that the other functions of a traditional on-campus experience—student selection, extracurricular leadership and social development, career management and alumni networking—also will become unbundled. Most business schools inevitably would lose their allure. We’re already witnessing the very beginning of...

Executive MBA Programs Gain Popularity in India...

Now, more and more of India’s top business schools are offering one-year executive M.B.A.’s, mostly to computer professionals and others with technical backgrounds For decades, the only way to get into top Indian graduate business programs was to take a competitive entrance exam while still in college. Fewer than 1 percent of applicants were accepted. Those who did not make the cut went overseas if they could, or studied another subject. Once they had moved on, there was no going back. Then, 10 years ago, the Indian School of Business opened its doors in the southern city of Hyderabad, offering something different ” a midcareer M.B.A. in just one year. Enrollment in its flagship program, which requires a minimum of two years of work experience, grew to 575 this year from 126 in 2001. Demand is growing and the school plans to open a second campus next year for more than 200 students in Mohali, in Punjab, one of India’s richest states. Now, more and more of India’s top business schools are offering one-year executive M.B.A.’s, mostly to computer professionals and others with technical backgrounds who want to change careers or take on new roles at their organizations. While the institutions offering such programs say their graduates are every bit as capable as those who receive traditional two-year M.B.A.’s, some employers are doubtful. But teachers, alumni and job-placement officers say there are reasons to believe that recruiters will eventually overcome their skepticism. Demand is climbing at top institutions that offer one-year executive M.B.A.’s. Across the Yamuna River from New Delhi, the Noida campus of the Indian Institute of Management-Lucknow was set up only for executive education. Enrollment in the one-year program was just under 50 for the first three...