The Right Business School

Committing two years of your life, together with a few thousand dollars, deserves a careful consideration. One of the first and most important decision you will have to make is which Business School. With over 700 schools all over the country (and a few more all around the globe), this is not always an easy task.

Where To Go To Business School Based On Your Personality Type...

There are many ways we describe our personalities — bubbly, independent, charismatic, innovative, enthusiastic, etc — and our personalities are a huge part of who we are. As such, when making a decision about where you should go to business school, it’s important to consider how your personality type would do at different schools. A popular personality test is the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), which ultimately allows a person to classify themselves using bigger characteristics — Extraversion (E), Introversion (I), Sensing (S), Intuition (N), Thinking (T), Feeling (F), Judging (J), and Perceiving (P), which led to the creation of 16 basic personality profiles. These 16 profiles can more broadly be sorted into four categories — Analysts, Diplomats, Sentinels, and Explorers — with four different personalities per category. You can easily take a test to figure out what type of personality you are, and then use your results to help you figure out the right school for you. Here’s a rundown of some of the best business school programs for certain personality types according to the MBTI. Logician (INTP). Logicians are innovative inventors with an unquenchable thirst for knowledge. Some of the common characteristics of this personality type include strong creativity, enthusiasm for new ideas, rationality, and imagination. As Logicians are more suited for independent learning and less rules, colleges like Cornell University, Rice University, Princeton University, and University of Texas – Austin would be better fits for this personality type. Commander (ENTJ). Commanders are described as bold, imaginative and strong-willed leaders, who always find a way — or make one. Some of the common characteristics of this personality type include natural leadership skills, charisma, confidence, and determination. There are a number of universities with exceptional business school programs that...

14 MBA Programs That Lead to Jobs

Landing that first job is a major concern for MBA students, and some programs are more likely to lead to success than others. Among the 129 business schools that submitted job placement data to U.S. News in an annual survey, two of them – the University of South Florida and Coastal Carolina University in South Carolina – saw 100 percent of MBA graduates who sought jobs employed three months after completing their degrees in 2015. Both of these schools, however, were ranked by U.S. News in the bottom one-fourth of the 2017 Best Business Schools rankings. In comparison, Washington University in St. Louis’ Olin Business School, the highest-ranked school among the 14 MBA programs with the highest employment rates, had a job placement rate of 97.1 percent. None of the 14 schools with the highest job placement rates ranked above No. 21 in the graduate business school rankings. Overall, top-ranked schools had higher enrollments and, therefore, many more graduates looking for jobs after graduation. For instance, Harvard University, ranked No. 1, had 672 full-time grads seeking employment and a job placement rate of 91.1 percent by three months after graduation. Of all the schools that submitted these data, Florida International University came out on the bottom of the list with a job placement rate of 27.3 percent – significantly lower than both the overall average of 83.9 percent and the average for the top 14 of 97.1 percent. Below is a list of the 14 full-time MBA programs where the highest percentages of job-seeking graduates were employed three months after graduating in 2015. Unranked schools, which did not meet certain criteria required by U.S. News to be numerically ranked, were not considered for this report. School (name) (state) |...

Online Tool Helps Prospective Students Find the Right MBA Program...

Prospective MBA students have a new tool to use when trying to find the right school: the “MBA Rankings Calculator.” Designed by the University of Washington’s Foster School of Business, the web-based tool allows users to create a custom list of MBA programs by choosing the factors that matter most to them, including salary and placement, employer reputation, and return on investment. Around 250,000 students in the US pursue an MBA each year, and according the US Department of Education the average cost for a year in an MBA program is $30,000. That means the MBA market amounts to more than $8 billion annually. It’s a big business and rankings play a strong role in guiding early decision-making. The Foster School’s Rankings Calculator was developed to help MBA applicants make informed decisions and access diverse rankings metrics in one convenient place. Prospective and current MBA students helped shape the calculator design and select the metrics. “Obviously, we urge MBA candidates to always consider the culture, the community, the location, the student services, program performance and other areas that matter to them when choosing an MBA program,” said Dan Poston, assistant dean of master’s programs at the Foster School. “But we know for nearly all candidates the rankings are a consideration. Not only does this tool help them filter data from multiple rankings to see the results that that are most important to them…it’s just fun to explore how school rankings change based on different priorities.” To achieve this, the calculator leverages data licensed from U.S. News & World Report, Bloomberg Businessweek, The Financial Times, Forbes and M7 Financial. Prospective applicants distribute 100 points across up to 10 metrics. Based on the results, candidates can fine-tune their formula to develop...

13 MBAs that are really worth your money

Sure, you want to get an M.B.A. to make a higher salary and you may even be willing to plunk down the small fortune that the top programs are charging these days. But, still, you’ll want to make sure such an investment will pay off. So it’s worth checking out this list of M.B.A.s in the U.S. ranked by return-on-investment, calculated using total tuition cost and average graduate salary. The big names are all over this list, which probably comes as much-needed solace for grads who have dropped over $100,000 for their degrees. But there are also a few schools that may not have caught your attention before and come in under $55,000. We’ve included the school’s U.S. News & World Report ranking as a point of comparison. Three of the top 13 schools significantly outperform their overall U.S. News ranking when it comes to ROI. Many of the bigger names have a slightly lower ranking when it comes to ROI than overall, but when it comes to the top of the top, it looks like grads are getting exactly what they’re paying for… Read full story:...

All MBAs Are Not The Same

It was not that long ago that an executive with an MBA was something of a rarity, marked out as a high-flyer heading for the C-suite. Today an MBA is virtually a prerequisite for anyone wanting to get on in business – but the resulting proliferation in courses and institutions offering them has given them a headache: the tyranny of choice. Now the dilemma facing the ambitious executive is not so much whether to take an MBA, but which one to choose. “If you have want to work in a senior position, an MBA is seen by many people almost a requirement,” says Sean Ennis, director of MBA programs at Strathclyde University in Scotland. “But there is an argument to say that an MBA has been somewhat devalued by the sheer number of schools running it, and some are not worth the paper they’re written on.” This puts a significant emphasis on international rankings. One of the most widely-used is produced by the Financial Times and measures the impact of an MBA on salary. According to the latest ranking an MBA from Harvard Business School, the top-rated, leads to a 96% salary bump, to $179,910. Even among the top 100 ranked MBAs there is considerable variation, with salary uplift ranging from 55% to 160%. But these figures also need to be set in context. Some of the biggest salary increases are associated with business schools in China, where pre-MBA salaries are likely to be lower and graduates more likely to find work overseas on completing their course. Fortunately, would-be students can also compare other indicators including employment rates, career progression and whether alumni would recommend the course. “An MBA does open doors but companies are looking for graduates from...

Why B-School Applicants Should Opt For An International MBA...

Pursuing an MBA overseas is an invaluable opportunity to experience cultural diversity, along with gaining the obvious academic knowledge. It is for those who are looking to transform themselves, adopt new ways of thinking, and take on a new challenge, while broadening their horizons. There are many factors to consider, but below is a list of some of the most important ones: Financing Your Education Cost is an important factor to consider in studying an MBA abroad. Explore scholarships, loans and financing options for international students. You must research these options offered by both your home country and the ones available in the country you wish to study in. Connect with current MBAs as well as alumni from your dream school to discuss living costs. Prerequisites Most business schools accept the GRE as well as the GMAT. Both of these admissions exams require extensive preparation. Start early. Selecting The Right Business School While selecting an international MBA program it is not only important to consider MBA rankings from the Financial Times, the Economist and Bloomberg Businessweek, but also to research programs that will be recognized by your future employers. Speak to current students and alumni from who come from similar backgrounds and are of a similar demographic to you about why they selected a particular MBA program, and how it helped them achieve their career goals. Visa Application Student visas are required in order to pursue an international MBA program. Start researching the visa application process simultaneously while exploring MBA programs overseas. Language Requirements Most international MBA programs are conducted in English but there are business schools which require an entry and exit language that is different from your native language. If you intend to apply to these MBA...

How the Harvard MBA Compares To The Stanford MBA...

For the last three years, Harvard Business School (HBS) and Stanford Graduate School of Business (GBS) have led the Financial Times’ ranking of the world’s best master of business administration (MBA) programs. Stanford came in first in 2012, and Harvard topped the list in 2013 and 2014. In this year’s ranking, Harvard is still first, but Stanford is in fourth place after London Business School and University of Pennsylvania: Wharton. According to the Times Higher Education, the ranking “is based on a number of different factors including gender diversity and the international spread of students, but the heaviest weighting is placed on alumni salaries.” Based on the 2015 FT ranking, alumni from HBS and GBS have the highest salaries with $179,910 and $177,089, respectively—and they had the highest salaries in previous years as well. So what are the advantages and disadvantages of each program, and how do Harvard and Stanford compare? “TO EDUCATE LEADERS THAT MAKE A DIFFERENCE IN THE WORLD” “To educate leaders that make a difference in the world,” is the mission of the HBS MBA program. Harvard’s MBA program was founded in 1908 as the first program of its kind. The MBA takes two years: the goal of the first year courses is to provide students with a foundation in “broad-based fundamentals.” During the second year, students can choose from over 90 courses in ten different categories. HBS emphasizes its “focus on real-world practice […] using the case method, which puts students into the role of decision makers every day.” Today, there are more than 76,000 HBS alumni living in 167 countries with nearly 50 percent of alumni working in general management, 23.4 percent in finance and 23 percent in professional services. Famous HBS alumni include...

Should Harvard Business School Hit Refresh?

The institution that required students to carry laptops as early as 1984 and sent graduates to top posts at Hewlett-Packard Co. and Facebook Inc. is not keeping up when it comes to teaching management in a tech-focused era, say students, faculty and alumni. Meanwhile, competitors like Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business and Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management have established themselves as pre-eminent tech-industry feeders, according to the schools’ annual career reports…Read full story: Wall Street...

These Are the Students Good Enough to Turn Down Harvard Business School...

Who in their right mind would get accepted to Harvard Business School and turn it down? Turns out the answer is: someone who also got into Stanford. It’s a nice problem to have: You’ve been admitted to two or more MBA programs and can only choose one. As you weigh a host of factors, you might be curious about the decisions of recent students who faced the same set of school choices as you. Using data from students who answered a survey for Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2014 MBA rankings (about half of all 2014 graduates at ranked schools), we’ve identified MBAs admitted to specific pairs of top programs and tried to make sense of where they ended up. What we can’t glean from this: insight into financial aid packages, location preferences, or any other factors that might drive an applicant’s choice. Still, few things are a purer indicator of which school is truly most desirable than where the most sought-after MBAs—the ones with their pick of highly selective schools—chose to go. Duke (Fuqua) vs. Michigan (Ross): 128 students admitted to both programs Despite Fuqua’s claim to the top spot in Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2014 Full-Time MBA rankings, the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, ranked ninth and situated far from sunny North Carolina, claims more than twice as many applicants who get into both schools. Thirty-seven percent of students admitted to Fuqua and Ross select another program altogether. Chicago (Booth) vs. Northwestern (Kellogg): 113 students Hometown rivals Booth and Kellogg have both been No. 1 in Bloomberg Businessweek’s MBA rankings at various points over the years, despite different reputations and strength areas. Booth is known for rigorous focus on quantitative skills, while Kellogg touts its powerhouse marketing faculty. When admitted...

Decide Between a Top U.S., Global MBA Program

Sometimes there are decisions in life you don’t want to complain about: Whether to vacation in the Bahamas or the Florida Keys, for example, or whether to buy a Mercedes or a Lexus. Sure, life could be worse. But that doesn’t make the decision any less anxiety-inducing. Students who get into the top MBA programs in the world find themselves in a similar predicament. Do they want to rub shoulders with Wall Street types at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School or make international connections over croissants at France’s INSEAD Business School? The top MBA programs on either side of the Atlantic differ in various ways, experts say. And prospective students should consider a variety of factors before they choose a top U.S. MBA program or an equally well-regarded program in Europe or beyond. The first thing students should consider when choosing between a top-tier U.S. or non-U.S. MBA program are the academic components, says Rachel Beck, a senior consultant at mbaMission, an MBA admissions consulting firm. While some programs have a general focus, others are known for their specialties. She suggests prospective students go through course catalogs to make sure they find a roster of classes of interest. Students should also think about what industry they would like to be in, and whether their school has connections to that field. Applicants drawn to business innovation and startup culture may be good fits for the graduate business programs at schools such as Stanford University, University of California—Berkeley and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, says Matt Symonds, co-director of the MBA admissions consulting firm Fortuna Admissions. At the same time, students hoping to enter careers in private equity may want to choose a program at places like Wharton, Columbia University or...

Do’s and Don’ts of Convincing MBA Programs You’re a Good Fit...

Focusing on fit is one of the most important elements of finding the right business school. This can seem like an abstract thing to determine at first glance. After all, many students assume they’d be just as happy at Harvard Business School as they would at University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business or MIT Sloan School of Management. This might be true, but these top business schools really aren’t one-size-fits-all. Your job, then, is to find out what is unique about each program, determine what about the program will most benefit your career goals, and persuade the admissions committee to take a chance that you will be a vibrant addition to its community. Many schools ask a version of the essay question, “Why Us?” – so here are some do’s and don’ts for addressing that prompt either in your application essay, or later on during the admissions interview. Don’t: Regurgitate the well-known characteristics of the program as a way of explaining your interest. I’ve read countless first drafts of essays that cite the “unmatched student body, world-class faculty, and committed alumni network” as the reasons the applicant has chosen a certain MBA program. The admissions committee knows what the program’s strengths are and doesn’t want to read essay after essay of its own marketing messages. Do: Show what you’ve learned about the program, beyond what you’ve read in the brochures and website, that makes it stand out for you. Your first point of entry will often be by participating in information sessions online or in your area, but the best way to really get to know the school is by visiting the campus and sitting in on a class. There’s no replacement for spending time in that environment...

10 Best MBA Programs for Minting Billionaires

Where should you go to get your MBA if you want to be a billionaire? Likely one of these schools, the top 10 when it comes to number of billionaire alumni. With 64, Harvard University is No. 1 when it comes claiming the most graduates who are now billionaires, according to a ranking by Wealth-X, a high-net-worth intelligence firm. Harvard produced nearly three times more billionaires with MBA degrees than Stanford University, the runner up and more than four times as many as Columbia University, the No. 3 ranked school. Of the 2,325 billionaires in the world, two-thirds have received a tertiary education, with approximately 21% of those getting their MBA degrees. Half of those have obtained their MBA from one of the 10 institutions named on the Wealth-X list. Top universities in the U.S. aren’t the only schools producing billionaires. Three international institutions made the Wealth-X list – France’s INSEAD, Switzerland’s International Institute for Management Development and the London Business School. Curious about the MBA programs that produced the most billionaires? Click through to see which schools can make you filthy rich. 10. London Business School Number of Billionaire MBA Alumni: 4 Notable Billionaire Alumnus: Kumar Mangalam Birla, chairman of Aditya Birla Group, one of the largest conglomerates in India. Net Worth: $9.2 billion. 9. International Institute for Management Development (tied with No. 8, University of Southern California) Number of Billionaire MBA Alumni: 5 Notable Billionaire Alumnus: Susanne Hanna Ursula Klatten, daughter of German industrialist Herbert Quandt. Net Worth: $15.3 billion. 8. University of Southern California (tied) Number of Billionaire MBA Alumni: 5 Notable Billionaire Alumnus: Ivan Glasenberg, CEO of Glencore Xstrata, the Swiss commodity trading and mining company. Net Worth: $5.9 billion. 7. New York University Number...