The Right Business School

Committing two years of your life, together with a few thousand dollars, deserves a careful consideration. One of the first and most important decision you will have to make is which Business School. With over 700 schools all over the country (and a few more all around the globe), this is not always an easy task.

What makes a global top 10 university?

The Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) is in first place in the latest league table of the world’s best universities. It’s the third year in a row that the US university, famous for its science and technology research, has been top of the QS World University Rankings. Another science-based university, Imperial College London, is in joint second place along with Cambridge University. Behind these in fourth place is Harvard University, the world’s wealthiest university. And two more UK universities share joint fifth place, University College London and Oxford. With King’s College London in 16th place, it means that London has three institutions in the top 20. Edinburgh University is joint 17th and there are two Swiss institutions, ETH Zurich and Ecole Polytechnique Federale de Lausanne, in this top tier. But US universities are still in the majority, taking 11 of the places in the top 20. Even though some university leaders might be sceptical about such rankings, they will all be sharply aware of their significance. Mike Nicholson, Oxford University’s head of admissions, says: “It’s fair to say that it would be a foolish university that did not pay close attention to how league tables are constructed.”. Read full story by Sean Coughlan at...

Study Business Abroad: Great Places for International Students...

Twenty years ago, studying business abroad was only for the adventurous or the downright quirky. Today, it’s increasingly commonplace. Why? Because employers of all sizes are now searching for – and fighting over – the truly international employee: the one who really understands how business is done in key markets around the globe. Those who study abroad while they’re young have international experience before they’ve even reached the workplace. Already ahead of their peers, they’ll be multilingual and have an increased understanding of different cultures. But what is it actually like to study abroad and what is the right location – or locations – for you? How is student life in Ireland different to student life in India, for example? What does a MacBook Pro cost in Australia compared to Austria? How much will a cappuccino set you back in Budapest compared to Beijing? In an effort to access their invaluable advice and experiences, we surveyed students from 29 leading business schools and universities around the world who are part of CEMS, the Global Alliance in Management Education. As part of their Master’s in International Management, the students are required to spend at least one term at a partner school in another country. For every location, we asked local students: What are the three key things you think someone coming to study in your home country should know before they arrive? And we asked visiting students: What are the three key things you wish you had known before you began studying at a school outside your home country? So before you get those visa applications sent off, find the study destination that suits you. Our country by country guide begins here… * You will note that we have not...

Your Top 5 Business Schools

Rankings published by various publications should not dictate where an MBA hopeful applies Many participants on the Bloomberg Businessweek Business School Forum spend lots of time debating the merits and pitfalls of business school rankings. While most admissions experts will tell them that rankings published by various publications, including Bloomberg Businessweek, are excellent starting points for research about MBA programs, they should not dictate where an MBA hopeful applies. Indeed, the advice has always been for applicants to come up with their own list of preferred business schools based on their wants, needs, and career goals. Recently, a forum participant, HaveAQuestion, began a discussion thread that asks others to come up with their own personalized business school ranking. The question is a good one, and it’s worth considering for those thinking of applying to MBA programs. To chime in with your own top five faves or to see what others think, you can visit the “What is Your Top 5?” discussion thread.Read full...

A globetrotter’s MBA program: Worth $140000?...

University of Virginia’s Darden School has joined a growing field of business schools offering global MBA programs, with residencies in four continents, at a hefty price. If you were a business school dean and had the chance to pull out a blank piece of paper and design the ideal global MBA program, what would it look like? For Peter Rodriguez, an economics professor and an associate dean at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, this was no theoretical exercise. Four years ago, Dean Robert Bruner asked him to do just that — sketch out the best possible design for a new global MBA program for executives. “I remember him saying, ‘We need to wake up every day and worry about how we are going to become more global.’ I think I wake up every day and worry about it.” Now, years after studying the market, the result of that worry and work will debut this August. Darden’s Global MBA program is a bold undertaking in global business education, an experience that promises to challenge current notions of what a global MBA program can be. It also comes at a time when there already is plenty of competition from other programs for global execs. And it won’t be cheap. The price: a hefty $139,500, not including an estimated $12,000 in additional travel costs. Starting in August, some 40 students will undergo six two-week residencies at Darden’s home campus in Charlottesville, Va., and Washington, D.C., but also in Brazil, India, Europe, and China. A third of the course work will be delivered online, in live weekly classes, with virtual learning teams, and integrated work projects. Some 15 faculty members at Darden will be involved in delivering the program.Read full...

Operation B-School: Finding the Right MBA

Information overload makes finding the right B-school more difficult than it needs to be. Here’s how to find what you need, and toss what you don’t In the millions of words of advice proffered each year on all aspects of the MBA experience, the very first step of the business school admissions process”the research”is virtually ignored. Yet choosing the right school is vital, and you can’t do that without first popping a few hoods and taking a look inside. From bloggers to business school associates themselves, people have a lot to say about the admissions process, including which schools should be on an applicant’s radar, how to write a decent application essay, and where to get recommendation letters. Wading through all the material and so-called help to get the right list of potential schools can be overwhelming. Many do not know where to start. “It can be a daunting task,” says Bruce DelMonico, director of admissions at the Yale School of Management (Yale Full-Time MBA Profile). “There’s so much info out there for you to process.” YOUR PRIORITIES Researching business schools is akin to trying to find oneself. Reflecting on what one wants to get out of a degree and the type of business school experience desired is key. Admissions directors say it’s not too different from gazing into a crystal ball. “Determine your priorities,” says Kathleen Edwards, associate director of MBA admissions at Emory’s Goizueta Business School (Goizueta Full-Time MBA Profile). “Think about how the degree will advance your career, the job you’d like to have, and your lifestyle. Then consider your preferences of location, personality of the school, the kind of alumni it produces.” After some introspection, an applicant can start talking to others. Informational interviews with...

Choosing the right school

Criteria you should carefully research before applying to a business school No single school is the best for everyone. The following are some of the criteria you shoul consider when choosing the school that’s right for you ACADEMICS Although many academic aspects are similar among B-school, the are some differences you should carefully research about: Case Study Vs Lecture Vs Practical Training: Most B-schools use a combination of the three, but some rely more heavily on one. Make sure you understand the three methods, which one you like best, and where the schools stand. Examples: Harvard and Virginia are almost 100% case studies, whereas Chicago and MIT are famous for being more lecture-oriented. Competitiveness Vs Cooperativeness: Most B-schools these days emphasize team-work. However, the environment in some of them put a lot of pressure on the individual to exceed. Some very competitive schools are Harvard and Chicago, whereas Northwestern, Duke and Dartmouth seem more cooperative. Concentrations: In most schools, you have to choose and stick to a particular concentration. While most offer Finance, Marketing and Operations, others are more difficult to find, like Management Information Systems, Human Resources and Health Care. Some schools, like Michigan, are very flexible in the concentration. Core courses: Some schools try to keep core courses to the minimum. Others have a full year and more. Some let you wave core courses based on previous school work or placement exams, others don’t. Electives: Take a look at the electives offered, and make sure they fit your requirements. Be aware that the most popular electives fill quickly, and it may be hard to get in. Faculty: Professors’ quantity and quality, as well as their dedication to teaching and research, can be an important criteria. Lookout to...