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When Will Asia Reach Number 1 In MBA Rankings?...

China is predicted to become the largest economy in the world before 2030, according to a report by PricewaterhouseCoopers (PwC). But what about China’s business schools – are they on track to overtake Stanford, INSEAD, Wharton, LBS and Harvard? Stanford‘s rise to the top of the FT Global MBA Ranking 2018 is sure to grab the headlines. With GSB graduates reporting eye-popping salary figures– the first time a business school has reported average alumnus salary over $200k three years after graduation – this result was to be expected. The FT rewards weighted salary (20%) and salary increase (20%) more than any other MBA ranking, and combined with Stanford’s strong showing for research (a further 10%) the school has reached the #1 position for only the second time since the FT launched the ranking in 1999. After two invaluable years at #1, INSEAD should not be too disappointed with second place. At Fortuna Admissions we have seen a sharp rise in enquiries over the past 24 months with the global recognition the FT results has boosted. The school also benefits from an excellent ROI for the increasingly popular one-year course format preferred by the majority of European and Asian business schools. And the much-reported Trump effect continues to encourage a significant number of business school applicants to look beyond the US for their MBA experience. But this result is part of a wider trend that emerged in the MBA ranking published by The Economist last November, which sees US schools in the ascendancy with the strengthening US dollar of the past three years. Harvard Business School is the only M7 school to have lost ground in the FT ranking, in part because of lower faculty research output that the FT...

The Top 10 Most Affordable MBA Programs In The United States...

Funding an MBA is expensive and a big cause for concern. GMAC’s 2017 Prospective Students Report revealed 52% of prospective MBA students are worried about not being able to afford the cost of an MBA, and 47% are troubled by large student loans. With the opportunities generated by an MBA, return on investment (ROI) is often used as a justification for the high price of the degree. Still, for some, the initial price-tag acts as a barrier to higher business education. There are however, many initiatives which help ease the financial pressures. These range from a variety of scholarships offered by different business schools to novel, pay-as-you-study initiatives like that offered by Edinburgh Business School, the Graduate School of Business of Heriot-Watt University in the UK. For those studying abroad, organizations like Prodigy Finance—a borderless, peer-to-peer lending platform—provide international, post-graduate loans. Student Loan Hero looked at 116 of the top American business schools to identify which programs are most financially affordable, taking into account the average debt of graduates, average starting salaries, and annual tuition fees. Big-name institutions like UC Davis (ranked 48th for affordability) and Temple University’s Fox School Of Business (ranked 27th) feature in the top 50. Here’s Student Loan Hero’s top 10 most affordable MBA programs in the United States… Read full story:...

The Best MBA Programs In The US – And How To Find The Right Fit...

In November, Bloomberg Businessweek ranked Harvard Business School’s MBA program the best in the United States for the third consecutive year. Wharton and MIT Sloan took the second and third spots respectively, with Chicago Booth and Stanford making up the top five. The same names are filling out the top tiers of MBA rankings tables year after year—nine out of Bloomberg’s 10 best graduate business schools of 2017 featured in 2016’s top 10. But there are hundreds of MBA programs in the US, and thousands of MBA candidates are taking the GMAT® exam and the GRE® General Test to apply to business schools each year. How can you make the most out of the MBA rankings? Delve a little deeper First, be assured that the top-10-ranked business schools (listed below) are not the be-all and end-all. Bloomberg’s b-school ranking is based on surveys of recruiters, students, and alumni, as well as data on post-MBA job placement and starting salaries. These are all weighted in different ways—from the employer survey contributing 35% of the school’s overall score, to salary and job placement data, both at 10%. When considering the top-ranked MBA programs, it’s important to look deeper into the rankings—into the methodologies and the data beneath—to find the right fit. Based on Bloomberg’s research, the top three most popular US MBA programs among students are found outside the top 10—at UCLA Anderson, William & Mary’s Mason School of Business, and Johnson at Cornell. But, at the same time, the Virginia-based Mason School of Business ranks outside Bloomberg’s top-50 for its reputation amongst employers, its job placement rate, and post-MBA salaries. Similarly, the University of Washington’s Foster School of Business ranked number one for its job placement rate and 24th for...

Best MBA Programs In Europe – The Ranking Of MBA Rankings...

Following on from the Fortuna Ranking of MBA Rankings for the top U.S. schools, here is the league table for European business schools, looking at their 2017 standing across the four major MBA rankings. The results provide a valuable snapshot of performance as measured by the different methodologies used by Forbes, the Financial Times, The Economist, and Bloomberg BusinessWeek. But before we get to those results, and their potential impact on deciding where to apply for your MBA, there are three fundamental questions to ask yourself as you start your research to find the right business school for you. The answer to the first question is highly personal, but the answers to the second and third questions are slowly redefining the business education landscape. 1. Why do you want to go to business school? This first question features in many MBA applications, and there is no one right answer. Whether to make a career switch, accelerate your earnings, build your international credentials, learn new skills, expand your network, or simply enjoy a wonderful study experience, the professional, financial and personal rewards of studying at one of the world’s top business schools are compelling. My co-director at Fortuna Admissions, Caroline Diarte Edwards, reviewed many thousands of applications during her seven years as Director of Admissions at INSEAD. She observes that the one key action to dramatically improve your MBA application is to spend a considerable amount of time on self-reflection – no matter where you are in the process. “The admissions office doesn’t just want to hear about your academic excellence and professional experiences. They want to know who you truly are and what motivates you. And that includes insights on why you really want to do an MBA.” 2....

Brexit Could Cost MBA Jobs And Business School Applications...

UK’s business schools have been left reeling from the nation’s exit from the EU, with applications, jobs prospects and research funding now potentially at risk. Brexit threatens to harm the UK’s standing as a hub for elite universities, and Friday’s referendum result has placed the nation’s entire higher education sector into a period of uncertainty. Andrew Likierman, dean of London Business School, says: “Speaking personally, I am concerned at the implications of the result for the UK.” The UK is home to 14 of Europe’s top-ranked business schools by the FT. UK schools rely on their global standing to attract talent. But there are growing fears that the UK’s anti-EU sentiment will affect universities’ ability to recruit applicants. The proportion of British students in UK MBA programs has fallen from 58% in 2007-2008 to just 49% today, according to the Higher Education Statistics Agency. Brexit could not only turn potential students sour on the UK’s schools, but could also make it more difficult for schools to recruit faculty. For instance, 60% of Oxford University’s Saïd Business School professors are from outside the UK. Saïd did not respond to a request for comment. Ian Looker, education lead partner at PwC, says: “Not only is the research funding provided by the EU now at threat, but also the potential tighter controls over EU staff and students coming to the UK could well present UK universities as less attractive options to work and study.” LBS’ Andrew says: “For higher education as a whole, and London Business School in particular, this should not give the signal that the UK has turned inwards. We are a global school and I believe that the UK will remain an outstandingly attractive place to study.” Brexit could...

How many Indian CEOs have an MBA?

Does one need to have an MBA to ascend to the top of Indian companies? Not necessarily, but it helps. A Mint analysis shows that 144 of the CEOs of BSE 500 companies, India’s largest listed firms that make up 90% of its market capitalisation, have an MBA. Details were available for only 466 companies. Here, the term MBA is used loosely, to also include the much sought after post graduate diploma in business management or PGDBM that is awarded by the Indian Institutes of Management or IIMs. No other educational qualification comes close. Interestingly 81 of the CEOs are engineers but it is likely that many of the 144 CEOs with MBAs are engineer-MBAs. The Indian Institute of Technology and Indian Institute of Management Combination was and is a popular one. Still, there are 322 companies whose CEOs are not MBAs and it is evident that a B-school background may not be necessary to rise to the top — even in the case of professional managers. Here are five charts on the educational background of India’s top CEOs…Read full story:...

Insead tops ‘Financial Times’ MBA rankings...

Insead, the business school with campuses in France, Singapore and Abu Dhabi, has topped the Financial Times’ Global MBA rankings for the first time since they were introduced in 1999. This is the first time that an MBA programme with a substantial Asian presence has been ranked number one by the Financial Times , and marks a growing interest from elite students in Asian business and business schools. Insead is still the only top-ranked business school to teach its full-time MBA on multiple campuses, with 75 per cent of the 1,000 students studying in Singapore or in Fontainebleau, just outside Paris. It is also the first time a one-year MBA programme has been ranked in the top slot. The flagship MBA programmes of the four previous winners – Harvard Business School, Stanford GSB and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in the US, and London Business School in the UK – are all two-year degrees. These schools have been ranked in the top five slots along with Insead for the past three years by the FT. The full-time MBA programme at UCD Michael Smurfit Graduate Business School has been ranked 79th in the world and 24th in Europe in the survey. The school had been ranked 73rd in the 2015 rankings. The Insead MBA was the world’s first one-year programme when it began in 1959, though many others have followed. As the cost of studying for an MBA has steadily risen, many students are wary of taking on the debt associated with two-year degrees – students are frequently more than $100,000 in debt when they graduate. Though fees and living costs can be substantial, it is often the opportunity cost of lost salary that is the biggest...

The 19 best-value MBAs from Europe’s elite business schools...

Europe has some of the best business schools in the world, and the graduates getting MBAs often see their salaries explode in the years after graduation. But which are the most financially worthwhile for the students attending? How quickly can they make back the money they spend on the MBA after they finish? We took the recently published tuition-fee data from the QS/Top MBA global rankings, and used the top 25 European institutions in the ranks as the elite schools. We also looked at the salary data from the Financial Times’ 2014 European Business Schools rankings. The FT looks at the salary of graduates of each school’s MBA programme three years after graduation, compared to salaries before the course began. Nineteen of the 25 best Top MBA schools were covered by the FT. With this, we worked out what proportion of the total fees you could have paid off with the salary increase you saw over the three years after you finished the course. Of course, that salary increase can’t all be put down to the school, but it’s a good gauge of how quickly graduates are able to recoup the cost of the fees. 18. Imperial Business School: Salary gains pay for 64% of fees in three years. Salary three years after graduation: $103,604 Salary gain in percentage terms: 68% Salary gain in nominal terms: $41,935 Initial MBA fees: $65,691 MBA ranking (Top MBA): 22nd London-based Imperial Business School comes in at No. 9 for the most affordable MBAs in the UK alone. With the increase in salaries seen three years after getting an MBA at Imperial, the average holder could pay for 64% of his or her total tuition fees. 17. University of St. Gallen Business School:...

The cost of an MBA in Europe has plummeted, thanks to a strong dollar...

A strong U.S. dollar has discounted the price of a European MBA and led, officials say, to increased interest from American students. Add one more upside to the European MBA for U.S. students. Already, MBA programs in Europe offer an advantage to many students in their typical one-year length, cutting tuition along with opportunity costs. And the top European B-schools tend to accept higher percentages of applicants with lower GMAT scores than highly ranked U.S. schools. Over the past year, the strength of the U.S. dollar versus the euro has drastically discounted the price of a European international MBA, and led, school officials say, to increased interest from American would-be MBAs. The euro has plunged from a high of around 1.4 dollars per euro in May 2014 to 1.1 now, making it 21% cheaper for students who use dollars to pay European MBA tuition. INSEAD’s current tuition of 65,800 euros costs $71,557 in dollars – but if the euro hadn’t fallen since this time last year, that price would have been $89,488. Of course, the true savings are even greater when you add in the estimated living expenses of 23,800 euros that come with getting an MBA on INSEAD’s Fontainebleau campus in France. That’s $7,140 less expensive than only a year ago. The price differential is less consequential for U.S. students who enroll at schools in Britain. That’s because the United Kingdom government never adopted the euro and kept its own currency, the pound sterling, which hasn’t suffered as significant a fall against the U.S. dollar in the past year. The price break is less than half in the U.K., at 9.8%. At London Business School, for example, tuition for a student starting in its two-year MBA program this...

Be a Standout U.S. Applicant for European MBA Programs...

Prospective MBA students who want to get their degrees quickly can apply to one-year, domestic MBA programs, which are a growing offering in the U.S. But if they want the same quick experience, while also getting a global perspective, an MBA overseas may be a better option. European schools typically offer full-time programs that are shorter than two years, experts say. And applicants who choose one of these programs may not have to worry about being the lone North American transplant in class. In 2014, 35 percent of full-time, one-year European MBA schools saw an increase in foreign applicants, according to a report from the Graduate Management Admission Council. The hardships that come with getting into top-ranked U.S. business schools may be encouraging some applicants to look abroad, says Kaneisha Grayson, who runs The Art of Applying, an admissions consulting company. “Students are getting weary of the sheer competitiveness,” says Grayson, who graduated from Harvard Business School. While MBA programs in Europe can certainly be tough to get into, she says, some U.S. students might be able to sell themselves better with international schools…Read full story: U.S. News & World...

Should Harvard Business School Hit Refresh?

The institution that required students to carry laptops as early as 1984 and sent graduates to top posts at Hewlett-Packard Co. and Facebook Inc. is not keeping up when it comes to teaching management in a tech-focused era, say students, faculty and alumni. Meanwhile, competitors like Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business and Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management have established themselves as pre-eminent tech-industry feeders, according to the schools’ annual career reports…Read full story: Wall Street...

These Are the Students Good Enough to Turn Down Harvard Business School...

Who in their right mind would get accepted to Harvard Business School and turn it down? Turns out the answer is: someone who also got into Stanford. It’s a nice problem to have: You’ve been admitted to two or more MBA programs and can only choose one. As you weigh a host of factors, you might be curious about the decisions of recent students who faced the same set of school choices as you. Using data from students who answered a survey for Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2014 MBA rankings (about half of all 2014 graduates at ranked schools), we’ve identified MBAs admitted to specific pairs of top programs and tried to make sense of where they ended up. What we can’t glean from this: insight into financial aid packages, location preferences, or any other factors that might drive an applicant’s choice. Still, few things are a purer indicator of which school is truly most desirable than where the most sought-after MBAs—the ones with their pick of highly selective schools—chose to go. Duke (Fuqua) vs. Michigan (Ross): 128 students admitted to both programs Despite Fuqua’s claim to the top spot in Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2014 Full-Time MBA rankings, the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, ranked ninth and situated far from sunny North Carolina, claims more than twice as many applicants who get into both schools. Thirty-seven percent of students admitted to Fuqua and Ross select another program altogether. Chicago (Booth) vs. Northwestern (Kellogg): 113 students Hometown rivals Booth and Kellogg have both been No. 1 in Bloomberg Businessweek’s MBA rankings at various points over the years, despite different reputations and strength areas. Booth is known for rigorous focus on quantitative skills, while Kellogg touts its powerhouse marketing faculty. When admitted...