B-Schools Asia Pacific

Russian MBA: playing by the rules and not.

Independent rating of Russian business-schools “Exclusive Personnel” business publication represents its own independent rating of Russian business-schools. 70 educational establishments, where managers and entrepreneurs comprehend higher mathematics and acquire an MBA degree, participated in the rating. The structure of Western business is such that only people with an MBA degree can occupy positions of a certain level. But an MBA degree in Russia is optional and often criticized as it does not guarantee career take off or rapid salary increase. Natalya Bukhshtaber, Head of department of Higher School of Business (Moscow State University) lists the complaints of business companies’ representatives: “You have to teach business school graduates to work. They wait for a hint and do not take responsibility. They cannot assess a situation critically and see the full picture. Their knowledge outdates quickly and can become inadequate.”…Read full...

The Bargain MBA

You can still go to Asia for a bargain MBA Not long ago I wrote about a recent graduate who had cut her college costs in half by going to another country. (See: “Royal College Bargain”) Ever since then, I’ve wondered why so many American college students stay here and pay so much. Others are wondering the same thing ” as this blogger put it, going abroad is “a hell of a lot cheaper, and you don’t emerge deep in debt like you would back home.” But if you’ve stayed here, that’s fine. You can still go to Asia for a bargain MBA. Business students, of all students, should realize that competition is global, even in education. On top of that, they have a strong incentive to shop around because MBAs cost a fortune. The math is striking: Duke University’s MBA program is ranked 20th in the world on the Financial Times’ list of the best business schools. It takes two years and roughly $100,000 to get a degree, although that’s just for tuition, not housing or books. The University of Michigan’s business school is ranked 24th in the world and takes a similar amount – out-of-state students will pay $105,888 for two years there. Books and other expenses could add another $41,000. Some other top U.S. schools cost even more. The University of Pennsylvania, Harvard, Columbia, Stanford, Northwestern, Dartmouth, University of Chicago and MIT all charge higher tuition, the Michigan representative cheerfully told me. But the Indian School of Business in Hyderabad, India costs $45,750, which includes housing and all other expenses. Plus it takes one year of your life, not two, and is ranked 13th in the world. To state the obvious, that means you pay half...

B-Schools Embrace China

Western Schools Capitalize on Huge Demand for Managers. And Their China Programs Also Pay Dividends at Home.. Just like large companies eager to get a foothold in one of the world’s most important markets, international business schools are moving into China in a big way. Eager to capitalize on demand in a fast-growing economy that has a huge need for well-trained managers, big name B-schools from Europe and the U.S. are launching and expanding M.B.A.-program collaborations with Chinese universities or going it alone with courses aimed at mid-career executives. Experience in China is also a selling point at home, since Western students increasingly see the benefits of studying at an institution whose faculty have close-up experience of the country. Such links can also give M.B.A. students the chance to study in China for a module or a semester. “The lure is to go and learn about what’s happening, and be in the middle of the action in one of the most dynamic economies in the world,” says Krishna Palepu, senior associate dean for international development at Harvard Business School. The school has had a faculty research base in China for about 20 years but now shares a new Shanghai classroom with other Harvard schools. “In the last four or five years we have ramped it up to a much larger scale,” he says. A flurry of deans from top international institutions who have moved recently to run programs in Asia shows the influence the continent’s institutions now wield in the B-school world, says Matt Symonds, whose company, Symonds GSB, does consulting for business schools…Read full...

U.S. Business Schools Get More Competition From Abroad...

U.S. graduate business schools are losing their iron grip on the thriving market for international M.B.A. students At the 25 U.S. graduate-business programs that award the largest numbers of degrees to international students, applications for the 2011 fall semester declined 4%, according to a survey released Tuesday by the Council of Graduate Schools, based in Washington, D.C. Although international applications to all American business schools rose by 4%, that figure paled in comparison to the 12% growth in international bids to U.S. programs offering degrees in engineering and physical and earth sciences, the survey said. Business-school deans attribute the relatively sluggish growth to a growing number of high-quality competitors overseas. “Schools throughout Europe, Asia and Australia have made huge investments in graduation education in general”more specifically, business school,” said James Wimbush, dean of Indiana University’s graduate school of business. In other disciplines, international applications to U.S. graduate programs rose 9% in education, 8% in arts and humanities, 8% in life sciences, and 5% in social sciences and psychology, making business the field with the smallest increase. The trend is evident in separate data from the Graduate Management Admission Council, which administers the GMAT, the most popular entrance exam for graduate programs in business. GMAC sent less than 78% of its scores to U.S. schools in test-year 2010, ended last June 30, compared with 83% in test-year 2006. During that period, the total number of exams sent jumped to 779,000 from 601,000, according to the GMAC Web site. In one indication of growing international demand for graduate degrees in business, non-U.S. citizens taking the GMAT outnumbered U.S. citizens for the first time ever in test-year 2009, and did so again in test-year 2010…Read full...

Asian MBA Programs on the Rise

It’s official: Management education in Asia is booming With four schools firmly ensconced in the Financial Times top 20 global M.B.A. rankings”China Europe International Business School (CEIBS), Hong Kong UST Business School, the Indian School of Business, and the Indian Institute of Management”those who pursue an M.B.A. in Asia are banking on the idea that studying in the region will open doors faster, and wider, than ever before. Flexibility and cost are just two factors swaying applicants to look at programs in the Far East. Most are much shorter than the traditional two-year program in the United States and are significantly less expensive than the top American programs. For international applicants, a program in their home country or region may offer better opportunities for career advancement. And as a student from the United States pursuing international opportunities, a school in the target region may have similar benefits…Read full...