B-Schools USA

Should Harvard Business School Hit Refresh?

The institution that required students to carry laptops as early as 1984 and sent graduates to top posts at Hewlett-Packard Co. and Facebook Inc. is not keeping up when it comes to teaching management in a tech-focused era, say students, faculty and alumni. Meanwhile, competitors like Stanford University’s Graduate School of Business and Massachusetts Institute of Technology’s Sloan School of Management have established themselves as pre-eminent tech-industry feeders, according to the schools’ annual career reports…Read full story: Wall Street...

These Are the Students Good Enough to Turn Down Harvard Business School...

Who in their right mind would get accepted to Harvard Business School and turn it down? Turns out the answer is: someone who also got into Stanford. It’s a nice problem to have: You’ve been admitted to two or more MBA programs and can only choose one. As you weigh a host of factors, you might be curious about the decisions of recent students who faced the same set of school choices as you. Using data from students who answered a survey for Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2014 MBA rankings (about half of all 2014 graduates at ranked schools), we’ve identified MBAs admitted to specific pairs of top programs and tried to make sense of where they ended up. What we can’t glean from this: insight into financial aid packages, location preferences, or any other factors that might drive an applicant’s choice. Still, few things are a purer indicator of which school is truly most desirable than where the most sought-after MBAs—the ones with their pick of highly selective schools—chose to go. Duke (Fuqua) vs. Michigan (Ross): 128 students admitted to both programs Despite Fuqua’s claim to the top spot in Bloomberg Businessweek’s 2014 Full-Time MBA rankings, the University of Michigan’s Ross School of Business, ranked ninth and situated far from sunny North Carolina, claims more than twice as many applicants who get into both schools. Thirty-seven percent of students admitted to Fuqua and Ross select another program altogether. Chicago (Booth) vs. Northwestern (Kellogg): 113 students Hometown rivals Booth and Kellogg have both been No. 1 in Bloomberg Businessweek’s MBA rankings at various points over the years, despite different reputations and strength areas. Booth is known for rigorous focus on quantitative skills, while Kellogg touts its powerhouse marketing faculty. When admitted...

How Yale is beginning to crack into the elite B-school ranks...

Dean Ted Snyder has made it his mission to turn Yale’s business school into a truly global enterprise. The school’s recent rise in the rankings shows that his efforts are starting to pay off. It’s an alluring morning in New Haven, Conn. Under a brilliant sun, the air is crisp and cool. The leaves on the trees are beginning to transform into a kaleidoscope of colors. And Dean Edward “Ted” Snyder of Yale University’s School of Management is strolling the halls of the school’s brand new $243 million complex. Gathered in the lobby are a group of young people—a dozen or so prospective applicants to SOM—who are waiting for an admissions official to give them the pitch and a tour of the building, which looks so modern it could be the Starship Enterprise. Dean Snyder moseys over to the group and asks what interests them most about Yale’s School of Management. The first and second people who answer his question make him nearly wince. One earnest-looking young man immediately says that it is the school’s non-profit slant. Another says it is the relatively small size of Yale’s MBA program, which this fall enrolled just 323 students, a little more than a third of the totals at Harvard, Columbia, Wharton, Kellogg, and Booth. What Dean Snyder had hoped to hear was that these potential applicants were keen on Yale because it is, in the dean’s own words, “the most distinctively global U.S. business school.” That is, after all, what Snyder has tirelessly worked to do in repositioning the school since his arrival as dean in mid-2011. There are only two other answers that he would have preferred to hear this morning: that they’re keen to look at SOM because it...

Decide Between a Top U.S., Global MBA Program

Sometimes there are decisions in life you don’t want to complain about: Whether to vacation in the Bahamas or the Florida Keys, for example, or whether to buy a Mercedes or a Lexus. Sure, life could be worse. But that doesn’t make the decision any less anxiety-inducing. Students who get into the top MBA programs in the world find themselves in a similar predicament. Do they want to rub shoulders with Wall Street types at the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School or make international connections over croissants at France’s INSEAD Business School? The top MBA programs on either side of the Atlantic differ in various ways, experts say. And prospective students should consider a variety of factors before they choose a top U.S. MBA program or an equally well-regarded program in Europe or beyond. The first thing students should consider when choosing between a top-tier U.S. or non-U.S. MBA program are the academic components, says Rachel Beck, a senior consultant at mbaMission, an MBA admissions consulting firm. While some programs have a general focus, others are known for their specialties. She suggests prospective students go through course catalogs to make sure they find a roster of classes of interest. Students should also think about what industry they would like to be in, and whether their school has connections to that field. Applicants drawn to business innovation and startup culture may be good fits for the graduate business programs at schools such as Stanford University, University of California—Berkeley and Massachusetts Institute of Technology, says Matt Symonds, co-director of the MBA admissions consulting firm Fortuna Admissions. At the same time, students hoping to enter careers in private equity may want to choose a program at places like Wharton, Columbia University or...