MBA Faculty

Yale’s Ted Snyder is Business School Dean of the Year...

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Business School Faculty Feedback: A Tool For Excellence Or Appeasement?...

Faculty feedback is supposed to be a great tool to assess the quality of education being imparted in an academic institution. For academics in general and business schools in particular, the faculty feedback mechanism is considered to be the vital component, key element, important parameter , an effective tool and clear indicator for assessments and appraisals. For B-schools, the significance of feedback is even more keeping in mind the market orientation of MBA degree. Simply put, MBA degree is mostly result oriented with clear outcomes (job opportunities) for the consumers (students). Hence, students ought to have the real power to evaluate the quality of service providers (teachers). Let us understand the importance of faculty feedback system in business schools. Most of the schools use the students’ feedback to assess the faculty, courses, delivery, pedagogy and content; some schools connect it to evaluate faculty’s yearly appraisal. There are several debates and meetings conducted inside the schools on how the faculty feedback system should be understood and interpreted. This is applied from top rated to schools to ordinary schools. Some schools evaluate based on students’ online digital submissions using some software, while some schools believe in paper-pen based submissions. There are qualitative and quantitative feedbacks. There are also schools that take both subject feedback and faculty feedback to check correlation between a faculty and subject. Many B-Schools – which have started to place emphasis on faculty feedback by their students – do not know the application of the insights thrown by data. And primary reason for inaction is the faculty crunch. This provides a cocoon to faculty with middling performance. The B-Schools are as well happy to keep the feedback system going without any effort to infuse meaning in it. Why...

Harvard professor sorry for fighting restaurant over $4...

Harvard Business School associate professor Ben Edelman was in the running this week for “Most Disliked Guy on the Internet” — and all because of $4. After accusing a restaurant of overcharging him, Edelman began an epic back and forth with the management that went viral. Now, the professor is apologizing for letting the dispute spiral so out of control. According to Boston.com, the saga began last week when Edelman placed an order at a family-operated Boston-area Chinese restaurant named Sichuan Garden. He was hungry for sauteed prawns with roasted chili and peanut, stir-fried chicken with spicy capsicum, braised fish filets and napa cabbage with roasted chili, and shredded chicken with spicy garlic sauce. When he placed his order, Edelman thought his meal would run him $53.35. But when he checked his receipt, he noticed he’d been charged an additional $4 — or, as he noted in the first of several emails he sent to Sichuan Garden, an apparent “increase of $1 on each and every item.” Celebrated bartender Ran Duan, who manages the bar inside his parents’ Sichuan Garden location, was the one to respond to Edelman’s complaint. In doing so, he kicked off an epic three-day email exchange that ended with Edelman, who is also a lawyer and fashions himself as a “Web sheriff,” considering legal action against the restaurant. It turns out that the menu Edelman viewed on Sichuan Garden’s website was out of date, which Duan apologized for and said he would fix…Read full story:...

Faculty Feared Distance Learning Course Would “Cannibalize” Traditional MBA...

The executive director of a leading business school has said that his faculty thought a shorter, cheaper mini-MBA program would “cannibalize” the traditional MBA, highlighting the challenges that business schools face in adapting their content for the modern business climate. It is becoming increasingly difficult to take two years out of work to obtain a full-time MBA degree. Many students are instead turning to flexible and distance learning programs. These formats allow managers to maintain jobs, learning skills and networking in their spare time, often through virtual learning environments. Alan Middleton, executive director of Schulich Business School’s Executive Education Centre, said he faced internal opposition from his Dean and faculty in bringing a shorter program to market: “They saw it as cannibalizing the MBA,” he said. “[They thought that] surely if somebody can get the brand, and something that said ‘mini-MBA’, that would signal that once I’ve got that, why would I need to go on and get a full-time MBA?” Alan said. He said that domestic demand for MBA programs has been flat in North America and Canada, and there was “nervousness” about the “flat market”. Demand from international students has been strong but US business schools rely more on domestic candidates to fill their MBA programs than schools in Europe, which have a higher percentage of foreign students. Alan’s comments come at a time when professionals are turning to distance learning programs, which are often cheaper or free, in huge numbers. Business schools have been forced to come up with more flexible programs to keep their numbers up, but many remain fearful of investing resources in shorter programs which typically charge participants less in tuition than full-time MBA courses. Schulich has since introduced a Mini-MBA program. At...

What to Look for in Online MBA Faculty

When Audrey McLaughlin was looking into online MBA programs, the Cleveland, Ohio, native cared a lot about overall prestige and program rankings. But she also paid attention to something more granular: the instructors. “I wanted the same faculty as the residential program,” says McLaughlin, who ended up enrolling in Indiana University’s online MBA program in 2013. “I wanted access to the same classes that I could have in person.” Vetting online MBA faculty is key, experts say, since instructors not only shape a student’s academic experience, but can also serve as helpful connections down the road. As a result, they suggest students follow in McLaughlin’s footsteps and research instructors, as well as the overall structure of a program’s faculty. “There are all kinds of models out there, and these are things that students should be aware of,” says David Sylvia, director of academic affairs for graduate programs at Pennsylvania State University—World Campus. One marker of a reputable online MBA program is shared faculty with the residential division, says Phil Powell, faculty chair of the online business programs at Indiana University. If an online MBA program outsources instruction, it’s a sign that school officials aren’t prioritizing the educational experience as they should, he says. “It’s a very quick and dirty way to differentiate whether the online program is seen as a strategic asset for the school or whether it’s just a quick way to make a buck,” says Powell, whose program, ranked No. 1 among online graduate business programs, uses the same faculty as the on-campus program. “All schools see their residential MBA programs as a strategic asset.” McLaughlin, who now works in North Carolina as a business support consultant, says online students benefit from instructors who teach the same...

For Female Faculty, a B-School Glass Ceiling

It’s lonely at the top. That adage could be the mantra of female faculty at business schools across the country who have reached the coveted and most prestigious step of their career ladder, full professor. The number of women who’ve obtained the full professor rank in B-schools remains dispiritingly low, with fewer than one of five women business school professors employed today as full professors, according to a 2010-11 salary survey of female faculty by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), one of the leading accreditation agencies for business schools. Women may still be far from a majority at most business schools, but the overall number entering the field has been steadily creeping upwards. Over the past 10 years, the number of female business school faculty climbed from 23.6 percent of total faculty in the 2001-02 academic year to 29 percent this year, according to the survey. The uptick comes as more women are considering careers as business professors; in the 2009-10 academic year, women made up 35.4 percent of doctoral students at AACSB-member schools, up from 31.7 percent five years ago. Despite the growing number of women entering the business school world, many appear to hit a stumbling block on the path to promotion, says John Fernandes, AACSB’s president. Women make up 40.6 percent of instructors and 37.3 percent of assistant professors. As women move up the career ladder and obtain tenure, the gender gap becomes more pronounced. Women make up just 29.1 percent of associate professors and a paltry 17.9 percent of full professors. “That is a huge drop-off rate,” Fernandes says. “I see the number of women faculty members in the classroom continue to change and increase, but I’m not so sure it...