MBA Recruiters

Virtually every medium or large-sized company recruits MBA grads. This section is a gateway to recruiters listings, including our own, by different criteria – those hiring foreign MBAs, those not hiring, Consulting, Marketing, and more. These listings should be useful when planning your MBA job search.

Here’s where MBA students want to work the most...

More than a quarter of business school students want to work for large investment banks, but increasingly more MBAs are setting their sights on startups, too. That’s according to an annual survey from Training the Street, which provides financial training courses to students and professionals. It asked 293 first- and second-year MBA students which type of firm would be their top employment choice. Bulge-bracket banks and global financial institutions came in first as the workplace of choice for 26.28% of respondents. 13.65% of respondents chose private equity firms, while 7.51% chose boutique banks. Of note, 7.17% of respondents chose startup companies as their choice place of employment – the highest percentage since Training the Street started providing that option in 2012. The percentage of MBAs looking to work for hedge funds was 4.78%, down from 4.9% last year. Here’s a look at the full tally…Read full story: Business...

Here’s Why Goldman Sachs, Citi, Credit Suisse Are Snapping Up IESE B-School MBAs...

Pascal Michels likes to think of himself as a market maker. For some MBAs, technology firms have replaced banks as the employer of choice. But while investment banking is down as a career, it’s not out. “We make sure we educate MBAs about the opportunities,” says Pascal, associate director of career services at Spain’s IESE Business School. And the opportunities are seemingly plentiful. Investment bank recruitment has surged at IESE, beating all records since before the financial crisis in 2007/08. Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Citi, Credit Suisse, Deutsche Bank, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, and Nomura are all recruiting, Pascal says. Thirty-one job offers were made by investment banks in 2016 to IESE’s MBAs, up from 22 the year before. Of the 61 IESE MBAs who applied for jobs at investment banks, 19 received at least one offer. Some received as many as four. Elle Connor, an associate recruiter at Morgan Stanley in London, says IESE is one of the investment bank’s three elite target schools. “The MBA profile brings something a little more niche to the floor, and has a more mature approach to certain situations. That’s why we continue to grow our MBA hiring,” she says. It is a similar story at Nomura. Sam Price, a Nomura graduate recruitment associate, says: “We target IESE Business School” along with two other European-based schools. Nomura values MBAs, he says, because “they can bring in some experience. The traditional route to the associate level would be through years as an analyst. An MBA is already at the associate level”. Andrea Hayem joined Morgan Stanley in June 2015 as a summer associate. The IESE MBA believes the business school was key to her landing the job. “Career services supports you throughout...

The Companies That Pay MBAs the Most

Business school is a profitable investment for almost anyone, but some MBAs are getting more dollar value out of their degrees than others. MBAs who worked in financial services several years out of school earned more than their peers in every other industry, and the best paychecks overall were doled out by investment banking firm Morgan Stanley, a Bloomberg survey of thousands of B-School alumni showed. As part of our annual ranking of business schools, Bloomberg surveyed 12,773 professionals six to eight years after they graduated from business school. The MBAs who work at Morgan Stanley took home the largest compensation packages, followed closely by alums at Goldman Sachs. We asked alumni who graduated from 2007 through 2009 about their current employer, base salary, and bonus. To figure out who pays the most, we focused on companies where we polled at least 20 MBAs. Graduates working in finance–which includes people in accounting and banking–took home a median $210,000. Real estate and energy were the next most lucrative industries. Perhaps the unlikeliest leader of the pack was agriculture, where MBAs made a median of $180,000—as much as they earned in consulting. (About 46 percent of the alumni we surveyed went into finance, tech, or consulting, while 8.5 percent worked in energy, real estate, or agriculture.) The companies that paid MBAs the most hailed mainly from the professions that have long been catnip for MBAs. Five of the 10 companies that paid MBAs the most were financial businesses and three were consulting firms. The only Silicon Valley representatives that made their way into the top 10 were Google and Apple. Even at those tech giants, MBAs earned 36 percent less than their peers at Morgan Stanley, mainly because they hauled in...

E-Commerce Companies Order More MBA Student Hires...

MBA students are turning to e-commerce companies including Amazon, Flipkart and Snapdeal as online retailers increase their business school recruiting activity to cope with growth and expansion into new markets. A survey of students including MBAs at some of India’s leading business schools found that 71% of respondents preferred the e-commerce industry to other sectors such as financial services and consulting. Assocham, which represents trade and industry in India, polled 500 students from schools including the high-ranking Indian Institute of Managements. Leading European business schools are also being tapped by large technology groups for new hires, many of them from the fast-growing online retail industry. Amazon, which plans to hire hundreds of MBAs in 2014, was the top recruiter at London Business School last year and was one of the biggest recruiters of MBA students at other schools with European campuses including INSEAD and HEC Paris of France. The migration to the tech sector is also evident across the Atlantic where many of these companies are headquartered in Silicon Valley. At Harvard Business School, the percentage of graduates going into financial services is down to 27% from 42% in 2006, while the percentage entering tech firms more than doubled during that period to 18%. At Stanford Graduate School of Business, seen as a feeder to the Bay Area, 32% of last year’s MBAs chose careers in technology. The shift towards the e-commerce sector is unsurprising. Financial services have become a less attractive path since the Great Recession, while technology companies are increasingly hiring MBAs for jobs in internal consulting – one of the most popular functions this year. Online retailers have also amassed troves of resources. Snapdeal, India’s third largest e-tailer, has raised $1 billion in 2014 and its...

Get Hired By General Electric

General Electric (GE), one of the largest global conglomerates, has just begun the business school recruiting season. The company is now in the initial stages of its ECLP – experienced commercial leadership program. The ECLP is the main entry point for MBA students, and will see GE eventually add to its 305,000 global workforce. Ferdinando “Nani” Beccalli-Falco, European CEO, said that he values holders of MBA degrees because they come with a certain amount of work experience. “We try to select widely and [select] the best possible people… Most come from good [business] schools, good backgrounds,” he said in an interview with BusinessBecause. With GE’s businesses ranging from aviation to healthcare in more than 100 countries, the program has strong employment opportunities. The company seeks to hire 100% of all ECLP candidates on a full-time basis. About 80 candidates are recruited for the ECLP each year from leading business schools including Spain’s IESE and HEC Paris of France. About 1400 candidates have been snapped up for the program since its inception. Participants complete three eight-month rotations in sales and/or marketing functions within their hiring business, and are expected to be geographically mobile. Every ECLP candidate receives at least six weeks of training over the course of two years. GE’s campus presentations kicked off in September, while resume drops are still open through October, with first round interviews also in October. This varies from school to school. Nani said: “Most of the ECLPS have done very well. We had a commercial manager meeting last [month] and four of the chief marketing officers of the many businesses we have in Europe are former ECLPs. It is a good path and we should continue to encourage this way of developing talent.”Read full...

Small Companies: The MBA Road Not Taken

They may lack the prestige of big companies, but in many ways small companies and MBAs have much to offer one another For many students and their schools, an MBA stands for Master of Business Administration during the program and then for McKinsey, Bain, and Accenture once the job search begins. So much is made of return on investment when the subject of MBAs is raised that it seems to be an undisputed truth that these programs naturally lead to positions with large, public companies. In such a context, an MBA program that channels alumni toward small or medium-sized enterprises (SMEs) will probably be seen as unsuccessful or lacking ambition. The same view is likely to be taken of students who choose to take the SME path. Smaller companies are seldom the sort of household name employers usually linked to MBAs and are likely to evolve in sectors whose managers have to get their hands dirty. However, there is a case to be made for SMEs being the best possible fit for an MBA graduate. A classic, high-quality MBA program is a general management curriculum designed to equip participants with all the skills needed to run a business. While the structure rests on specific subjects such as finance, strategy and leadership, the overall logic is to meld these blocks of knowledge together. In the vast majority of cases, MBA students shy away from too much specialization, preferring instead to focus on a well-rounded education. Limited MBA Roles at Multinationals Despite the courting of high-profile, multinational recruiters by MBA programs, their emphasis on preparing graduates for high-level management jobs does not always resonate with bigger employers. While a large company can offer a vast range of posts, these are often...