MBA Resume

A good resume, together with a powerful cover letter, is essential to getting an interview. You will have to spend some time working on this, so here’s a little help in writing and distributing them.

3 Ways to Sell Yourself With an MBA Resume

The MBA resume is a whole other animal from the standard curriculum vitae designed to land you a job. The resume you tailor specifically for business schools should offer a quick snapshot of your significant work experiences and accomplishments in three areas that showcase your MBA-relevant skills. • Leadership: Business schools want to see applicants who already have strong leadership skills. You’ll further groom your management abilities during your MBA program, but the admissions committee wants to know that the foundation is already there. Give evidence of when you united people behind a common goal, made use of other’s talents and skills, instilled a vision, challenged the status quo, identified a new problem or prioritized the needs of the organization above personal needs. If you formally manage one or more people, don’t leave that information out. Even if you supervise and mentor someone informally, that should go on the resume as well. If you have played a role in training peers, subordinates or even those senior to you (perhaps on a new type of software), include that on your resume. Anything that shows how you identified an opportunity and took initiative is a great thing to include. My client, George, was concerned because he did not have a title change throughout his four years at a defense contracting company. Because he worked in an engineering function, increase in responsibility was marked by a raise instead of a new title. My colleagues and I took a look at what George did outside of work to see where he could highlight a leadership role. George had participated in an annual charity bike ride for the past five years, and we suggested that he volunteer to coordinate the next ride. The event...

Action Words That Make An Amazing Resume

One of the most important things when writing a resume is to use action words. Not only will these words increase the impact of your resume in the eyes of the employers but they might help your resume get selected when recruiters use resume scanning Action Words That Make An Amazing Resume One of the most important things when writing a resume is to use action words. Not only will these words increase the impact of your resume in the eyes of the employers but they might help your resume get selected when recruiters use resume scanning software. Usually used to describe skills, experience and achievements, action words shouldn’t however be “stuffed” in your resume as you need to make sure your document sounds natural. Here is a list of action words that will turn your resume into a powerful marketing document: ability accelerated accelerated accomplished accurate achieved acted actively adapted addressed administered advised alerted allocated analyzed answered appeared applied appointed appraised approved arbitrated arranged assembled assessed assigned assisted assumed assured attained audited authored automated awarded balanced bought briefed broadened brought budgeted built calculated capacity careful cataloged caused chaired changed clarified clarified classified classified closed coached collected collected combined commented commitment communicated compared compiled completed comprehensive computed computed conceived conceived conceptualized conducted conducted considered consolidated constructed consulted continued contracted controlled converted coordinated corrected correspond graded granted guided halved handled cost control counseled counted created created critiqued cut dealt decided defined delegated delivered demonstrated described designed designed determined developed devised diagnosed diagnosed diplomatic directed discreet discussed dispatched distributed documented doubled drafted earned edited educated effected effective efficient eliminated enabled encouraged endorsed engineered enlarged enlisted entered established estimated evaluated examined executed expanded expedited experienced experimented explained explored expressed extended extracted fabricated...

How to Write Great Cover Letters

You have an impressive resume, you know how to present yourself well in an interview, you know what kind of position you are best suited for. . .now all you need is a chance to get your foot in the right door. Just what can you do to make that happe How to Write Great Cover Letters You have an impressive resume, you know how to present yourself well in an interview, you know what kind of position you are best suited for. . .now all you need is a chance to get your foot in the right door. Just what can you do to make that happen? Make sure you write a knockout cover letter, advise career planning specialists. “A cover letter is your chance to explain to an employer why he or she should consider you for the job,” says Jennie Z. Rothschild, Ph.D., executive director of Jewish Vocational Service on Reisterstown Road in Pikesville. “The best cover letters are specific and give examples that directly relate to the job you are trying to get.””Your cover letter is a targeted sales tool which should be tailored to the specific position you are seeking,” adds Ann Harrell of the Johns Hopkins University Career and Life Planning Center on Alexander Bell Drive in Columbia. The cover letter is also a good opportunity to show potential employers your writing skills, says Jennie Rothschild, and for those job-seekers whose native language is not English, a chance to show that you are comfortable with the language. Whatever your writing and language skills are, though, make sure that your letter has no mistakes. “Proofread! Proofread! Proofread!” emphasizes Ann Harrell. A cover letter, like most business correspondence, says Ms. Rothschild, has three basic parts:...

Resume Tips for MBAs

A great resume is not just a complete list of employment and education. . . it’s got to be a selling document Resume Tips “A great resume is not just a complete list of employment and education. . . it’s got to be a selling document,” says Kathryn Troutman, president of The Resume Place in Catonsville and author of the Federal Resume Guidebook. “Your resume needs to make very clear that you are highly skilled and an excellent candidate for their position, with energy and enthusiasm for your career,” Ms. Troutman adds. “A resume is like a snapshot,” agrees Nancy Leaderman, one of two resume specialists (along with Debra Varron) at The Associated’s Jewish Vocational Service, which offers a full range of employment counseling and programs, including resume preparation and job-seeking workshops. “You wouldn’t have a picture of yourself taken without combing your hair, putting on lipstick, or whatever it takes to make yourself look as attractive as possible. It’s the same thing with a resume. . .this is your first impression.” In terms of the visual appeal of a resume, says Ms. Leaderman, a resume produced on a laser printer makes a big difference. “A good dot matrix printer used to be all right,” she observes, “but with the availability of computers so widespread now, a laser printer is really the way to go.” Ms. Leaderman admits that the way a resume looks can be tied to the field the job seeker is exploring. “I think of resumes as akin to professional dressing,” she observes. “A resume for the banking industry might certainly look different from a resume for the advertising industry. “In more conservative areas,” Ms. Leaderman notes, “you won’t waver from 12-point black ink on white...