MBA Job interview

Mastering the Interview is a key step in getting the job you want. Three words: practice, practice and practice. Here you will find some good advice and preparation will certainly help.

How To Ace The Job Interview: Advice For MBA Students...

This post was cowritten with Ellen Regan, a first year MBA student at the Darden School of Business, actively recruiting for internships in marketing. To help Marketing/GM students prepare for the recruiting gauntlet, we sat in on a couple of interviewing workshop sessions led by Johnson & Johnson and E.&J. Gallo at the Darden School of Business, University of Virginia. To see tips on how to ace the interview from Johnson & Johnson, click here. Below are tips from Lee Susen, Marketing Director, from E.&J. Gallo (the world’s largest wine company and one of the top 100 companies for flexible green jobs). Tips from E.&J. Gallo: 1. Understand what the interviewer is looking for – Typically an interviewer is trying to get a sense of four things when speaking with a candidate: interest, fit, leadership, and skill. Make sure you can answer the following questions: Can you articulate why you are interested in the industry/company/role? Can you demonstrate that you understand the core values of the company? Have you been a leader in the past and are you well positioned to lead people in the future? Do you have direct or transferable marketing skills that can add immediate value? 2. Know what a technical marketing interview question is – Technical marketing questions test your ability to demonstrate skill in marketing and passion for brand-building. They are typically shorter than marketing case questions (one sentence) and provide less parameters to candidates answering the question. Examples include: How would you improve the positioning of [brand]? Why is [brand] performing poorly and what would you do to fix it? How would you increase the penetration of [brand]? How would you extend [brand] into another category? Because these questions don’t provide a lot...

The Salary Interview Question

“What salary are you looking for?” Career advisors say this is the interview question that makes job applicants squirm in their chairs. The Salary Interview Question “What salary are you looking for?” Career advisors say this is the interview question that makes job applicants squirm in their chairs. Small wonder. Most of us aren’t comfortable talking about incomes. We have been taught it’s not polite to ask people how much they paid for something or how much money they make. But in a job interview, it can be a make or break question. You need to cut the best deal you can without sounding too greedy or pricing yourself out of the market. So what do you say? Career advisors suggest that you try to get the interviewer to give you an idea of the salary range the company would consider before you commit yourself. Having tried this myself, I’m not sure I agree. The problem is that it’s in the company’s interest to get you as cheaply as possible, so if you are given a range, it’s likely to be on the low side. Unless companies are in a bidding war over your unique credentials, the interviewer will not worry about setting a range too low to interest you. After all, if you find the salary unattractive, you’ll be expected to make the case for a higher one, and if the company can’t agree to your salary demands there are other qualified applicants who might come in lower. The need to ask for more than has been offered puts you on the defensive, a position that leaves many job- seekers uncomfortable. If you are one of those, then state your own salary expectations before you ask for the...