MBA Internship

The Top 4 Mistakes MBA Students Make During The Internship (And How To Prevent Them)...

For many MBA students, the path to the internship took a lot of hard work. First, you have to get excellent grades in undergrad. Then, you need to work for a few years (and be successful) at a branded, impressive company known for selective hiring. Next, you line up the grades, the essays, the GMAT, and the references to land a coveted spot in a top MBA program. And finally, you get an internship offer at a top company—often a company that only recruits from five to 10 top MBA programs. Students from around the world would work for free for such an opportunity. You can see the light at the tunnel. What matters now is succeeding during the internship. Can you successfully adapt to a top company’s expectations? And to a new culture? You only have three months—what will it take to demonstrate competence and fit? I was recently talking to Elizabeth Diley, the recruiting manager for MBA hiring at General Mill’s, one of the world’s best companies at developing leaders (No. 3 on Fortune’s list). After almost eight years in recruiting, Elizabeth has since moved to an internal staffing role within General Mills developing marketing talent through their rotational and leadership programs. I asked her how students can succeed during the internship. Because of Diley’s connection to the recruiting industry, she had several illuminating stories to share. Below is her insight on the mistakes MBA students make—and how to prevent them. Top Mistakes MBA Students Make and How to Prevent Them 1. Believing That The Company Must Adapt To Them: One of the most common mistakes MBA students make, across industries, is to focus on what they want, or what they need. However, the business community is...

Consultants lure MBA interns with better pay than investment banks...

Choosing an internship should never be about the money, particularly for MBAs who likely have a fairly clear plan in place for their career. That said, who isn’t curious about what other people are taking home during their internship? And if you are struggling between two different industries, like say investment management and investment banking, compensation isn’t the worst tiebreaker in the world. Below is recently released data from New York University’s Stern School of Business. It details the average weekly base salary its students earned during their internship, categorized by industry. These are internships that students who are scheduled to graduate in 2015 undertook between their first and second year in business school. The main takeaway is that MBA interns make fairly strong salaries in most industries, though it’s important to point out that Stern is a top 10 U.S. business school on most lists, so adjust your expectations accordingly. It’s ranked the third best U.S. graduate school for getting a job in finance on one list. We rank it as the ninth best school for getting a job in investment banking globally. Plus, as Stern is located in the heart of New York City, most students likely worked close to home where wages are inflated to help meet the cost of living. Stern didn’t break the class down by city, but noted that 83% of students interned in the Northeast. Roughly 94% worked in the U.S…Read full story:...

Prepare for an MBA Internship

By January, some first-year MBA students have taken the first step in securing their careers as business leaders: They’ve accepted summer internship offers. Employment is such a critical part of the b-school experience that an MBA program’s career office usually starts working with first-year students before they arrive on campus and continues working with them — on resume writing, interviewing and other skills — after they find summer employment. “Once you accept an internship, the process doesn’t stop,” says Mark Brostoff of Washington University in St. Louis’ Olin Business School. Brostoff is the associate dean and director of the business school’s Weston Career Center. In areas such as consulting or banking, he says, it’s not unheard for students to already have internships lined up. [Target MBA jobs that pay well and require fewer hours.] Prospective students think about their career trajectory even before they get accepted into school. Many MBA programs require applicants to submit a resume, which can give the admissions team a sense of what students are like as employees. At the Yale School of Management, the admissions office wants to identify people who will not only do well academically but who also have high professional potential after they graduate, says Bruce DelMonico, the school’s assistant dean and director of admissions. “We want to see some evidence of excellence in your professional background.” Students who already know where their summer internship will be, and those who will find one in the coming months, can use spring semester to prepare for work. MBA candidates who find out early can take classes that are in line with their job, says Bukky Olowude, a 2014 MBA graduate of Yale. While a student, Olowude was a career coach for first-year students....