MBA GMAT

A standardize test required by most B-schools, the GMAT primarily tests four skills: Endurance and ability to focus, basic knowledge of grammar/math/reasoning/argument formation, test-taking skills and problem-solving abilities

11 MBA Programs With the Highest GMAT Scores

Preparing for the GMAT can be a tiring process, but scoring high is critical to gaining admittance to a top-ranked MBA program. At the 11 schools with the highest GMAT scores, incoming full-time students in fall 2015 had an average score of 715 or higher on the admissions exam, which has a maximum score of 800. Stanford University had the highest average GMAT score – 733 – among the 129 business schools that submitted this data. While the average GMAT score at Stanford rose by one point from its 2014 class, the school dropped a spot in the U.S. News Best Business Schools rankings, tying for No. 2. Harvard University, which took over the No. 1 spot in the rankings this year, had an average GMAT score of 725 – one point lower than its fall 2014 average. Harvard Business School also had more full-time students enroll in fall 2015 than any other school that submitted this data, boasting a class of 937. Among all the MBA programs that provided data on GMAT scores, the average was 630, much lower than the 722 average among the top 11. Below are the 11 business schools with the highest average GMAT scores for incoming full-time students in fall 2015. Unranked schools, which did not meet certain criteria required by U.S. News to be numerically ranked, were not considered for this report. Business school (name) (state) Incoming full-time enrollment (fall 2015) Average GMAT score U.S. News b-school rank Stanford University (CA) 733 University of Pennsylvania (Wharton) 732 University of Chicago (Booth) 726 Harvard University (MA) 725 Northwestern University (Kellogg) (IL) 724 Yale University (CT) 721 New York University (Stern) 720 Dartmouth College (Tuck) (NH) 717 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (Sloan) 716 Columbia...

Perfect GMAT won’t help you get into this B school...

It’s not even November and Harvard has already denied students acceptance to its MBA program. While it comes as no surprise that about 89 out of every 100 applicants are turned down for admission to Harvard Business School, the true shock is that many of the first round “dings” made by HBS happen to impressive candidates. According to the business education website, Poets & Quants, around 60 out of those 89 candidates refused admission are highly qualified students who have stellar GMAT scores and extracurricular activities. The site revealed the profiles of candidates who were rejected before the notoriously competitive, first round of admission interviews. Three out of the applicants who submitted their profiles have “nosebleed-territory” GMAT scores of 780, which would put them in the 99th percentile of test takers in the world. They also boast near-perfect GPAs with extensive accomplishments and professional experience. One of the candidates rejected without an interview listed that he is a Stanford University graduate who manages a strategy team for NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory. “This case surprises me because not only are the statistics for this person very high, but he is also a rare case of a candidate in the aerospace industry,” said Sanford Kreisberg, founder of HBSGuru.com and an admissions consultant who specializes in Harvard MBA applications. “Aerospace is a recognized, if not beloved, industry at Harvard Business School.” In this instance, Kreisberg speculated that there are several reasons the student was eliminated from the first round of interviews such as a poor written application or an admissions board mistake. Still, Kreisberg explained that with an admissions rate of about 11 percent, Harvard rejects a lot of candidates with high test scores because HBS is looking to build a class...

How To Score MBA Admission By Retaking The GMAT...

You have finally completed the GMAT and your scores lie before you. With so many important numbers on one page, how do you decide where to begin? Review Total, Verbal, Quantitative Scores Begin by reviewing these three measures. Your total GMAT score falls on a scale from 200 to 800, and the current mean result is 547. Quantitative scores range from 0 to 60, with an average mark of 38. Your Verbal score utilizes the same range. The current mean is 27. What does this mean for you? The average scores for all test-takers will not necessarily match the mean scores at your prospective schools. One strategy is to find the 80th percentile for those MBA programs that interest you. If your total GMAT score falls in or above that percentile, your chances of acceptance are likely to be higher. However, if your total GMAT score falls below that range and you believe you can improve the result, you should think about retaking the exam. Speak with the admissions counsellors at your business schools about how score will factor into their decision. Assess Integrated Reasoning, Analytical Writing Assessment (AWA) scores Your AWA response is scored from zero to six, and the current mean result is 4.34. Integrated Reasoning is a relatively new GMAT section and as such, it has the least historical data to analyse. Your Integrated Reasoning score can range from one to eight and the current mean score is 4.33. These portions of the GMAT tend to speak more to specific skill sets than the Total, Verbal and Quantitative sections do. For example: if you are a seasoned journalist, with numerous published works to your name, an admissions committee may not look at the AWA as the...

On B-School Test, Americans Fail to Measure Up...

New waves of Indians and Chinese are taking America’s business-school entrance exam, and that’s causing a big problem for America’s prospective M.B.A.s. Why? The foreign students are much better at the test. Asia-Pacific students have shown a mastery of the quantitative portion of the four-part Graduate Management Admission Test. That has skewed mean test scores upward, and vexed U.S. students, whose results are looking increasingly poor in comparison. In response, admissions officers at U.S. schools are seeking new ways of measurement, to make U.S. students look better. Domestic candidates are “banging their heads against the wall,” said Jeremy Shinewald, founder and president of mbaMission, a New York-based M.B.A. admissions-consulting company. While U.S. scores have remained consistent over the past several years, the falling percentiles are “causing a ton of student anxiety,” he said. Since people with near-perfect scores on the test’s math section now make up a significant percentage of all GMAT takers, “the higher you go, the harder it is to get to the next percentile or score,” said 22-year-old Natalie Miller, who eventually plans to apply to the University of Indianapolis School of Business. ENLARGE The GMAT, administered by the Graduate Management Admission Council, is typically required to apply to M.B.A. programs, along with undergraduate transcripts, essay responses and letters of recommendation. Students at top programs like Harvard Business School and Stanford Graduate School of Business have mean GMAT rankings around the 96th percentile. Of the test’s four sections—writing, integrated reasoning, quantitative and verbal—admissions officers view results from the quantitative section as a key predictor of business school success. Percentile rankings are calculated using a raw score—for the quantitative section, typically between 0 and 51. In 2004, a raw score of 48 in the quantitative section yielded...

How To Hack The GMAT: Get Into Your Dream MBA Program Cheaply...

I’ve never liked paying others to do something I believe I can accomplish myself (I’m kind of cheap). So when I decided to apply to business school, I was pretty shocked by how expensive the whole process could be. I was especially surprised at the costs for preparing for the GMAT, the standardized test required by virtually all MBA programs. I was determined to spend as little money as possible on GMAT prep – and you can too. Here are my top tips to keep your costs down, and to help you ace the exam. 1. Join a free resource hub and forum. I found the answers to all of my questions on the BeatTheGMAT website and forums. There you’ll find study plans and well thought-out explanations for pretty much any practice question you’ll come across. Cost: $0 Perhaps more importantly, you’ll discover a positive and supportive community where you can commiserate and celebrate. Studying for the GMAT can be a lonely road, so being able to talk to people who know exactly what you’re going through is invaluable. 2. Sign up for daily emails. BeatTheGMAT and other forums like GMAT Club let you sign up for daily emails with math and verbal questions – and links to the forum threads where you can debate the answers – which help keep you in GMAT mode. Cost: $0 3. Get by with a little help from your friends. A couple of weeks into my GMAT prep, I fortuitously ran into a friend at a party who had just finished taking the GMAT. We got to talking, and I found out that he had amassed a treasure trove of GMAT prep materials that he then gave me. While there are mountains...

Maximizing GMAT Scores: The Early Testing Strategy...

At the age of 20 or 21, the average GMAT score is 575. At 22 or 23, it’s 536, a drop of 39 points Wisdom is supposed to come with age, but calculus, trigonometry, the ability to balance a checkbook…these things don’t. In fact, the fall-off in math skills after college is about as steep and as scary as the drop in the value of a new car once you drive it off the lot. Let’s face it: youth has its privileges, and this is one of them. This all came to mind recently when someone pointed out a little statistical anomaly published in a recent GMAC publication. At the age of 20 or 21, the average GMAT score is 575. At 22 or 23, it’s 536, a drop of 39 points. Things improve a few years later, when most people are actually taking the GMAT, but 575? In your dreams. Which brings me to my point. If, after graduation, you suspect that you might be applying to b-school somewhere down the road, the wise choice would probably be to take the GMAT immediately”before you forget everything you learned in college. You just have to be sure to apply to an MBA program within five years, after which most b-schools will not accept those scores…Read full...