MBA Books

MBA books for 2016

Looking for something to read? Try these MBA related...

5 Awesome Benefits Millennials Gain From Their MBA...

Congratulations! You’ve earned your undergraduate degree and have started your very first job out of college. Those all-nighters have finally paid off. After receiving my B.A. in English and Political Science from The University of Texas at Austin, I decided to put my degree to good use and sell women’s shoes at Nordstrom for six months. I eventually went back for a Masters Degree and found out that a background in English can actually get you far in the startup world as a Content Marketer. But enough about me. The point I’m trying to make here is that college grads don’t always know what career path they wish to pursue straight out of college. If you aren’t going to law or medical school directly after your undergraduate studies, you are suddenly left with a variety of random options and job paths. This in mind, millennials today are recognizing the value of pursuing a higher degree of education. Of course, additional degrees aren’t necessary in order to be successful, but they can open a door of opportunities that otherwise would have remained closed. Consider an MBA, for example. Sure, there are many well-known entrepreneurs (i.e. Elon Musk, Mark Zuckerberg) who have remained “MBAless” and have had wildly successful careers. Unfortunately, not all of us have what it takes to be the next Mark Zuckerberg. Time for an MBA? Paul Ollinger, stand-up Comedian and Author of the new book, You Should Totally Get an MBA: A Comedian’s Guide to Top U.S. Business Schools, uses humor as a vehicle to provide business school applicants (of all ages) with great advice about what it takes to earn an MBA. After receiving his MBA from Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business, Ollinger decided to write...

Read Like an MBA: Top 5 Books Ivy Leaguers Read in Business School...

Want to get an Ivy League MBA education without the six-figure cost? It’s simple: read like an MBA student! We dug into the best school’s required reading lists Take a look at what MBA seekers at America’s top Ivy League schools are reading. Harvard Scaling Up Excellence: Getting to More Without Settling for Less by Robort Sutton and Huggy Rao “A great read that provides read, practical advice whether you’re a team of five or fifty thousand.” ––Lazlo Bock, Senior Vice President of People Operations, Google In Scaling Up Excellence, bestselling author, Robert Sutton and Stanford colleague, Huggy Rao Sutton offer a comprehensive guide to management in a package of enticing stories, subtly supported by references to high-end research. Their personal history in the Silicon Valley and their global access to interesting organizations provides a relevant backdrop. The main theme is that, while many good practices exist in organizations, they either get lost or there are difficulties when attempts are made to spread them (scale them) across the organization. The breadth of this theme means that this book will provide value to anyone who would like to see organizations improve. The benefits are not limited by industry, functional area or organizational size. Stanford What books do alumni from the Stanford Graduate School of Business recommend? Here’s one: Orbiting the Giant Hairball: A Corporate Fool’s Guide to Surviving with Grace by Gordon MacKenzie “It was written by a guy who made Hallmark cards. It’s about maintaining creativity in a corporate structure.” ––Tristan Walker, founder of Walker & Company Any business can morph into a giant hairball, a tangled, impenetrable mass of rules, traditions, and systems based on what worked in the past that can plunge it into mediocrity. Gordon MacKenzie...

7 books every MBA should read before they look for a job...

I consider myself incredibly fortunate to have spent my summer in Palo Alto, California, interning on the data science team at Wealthfront, a startup innovating in the financial services sector. I learned an incredible amount over those 12 weeks, not only about the job I was doing but about the many other areas of our business that are crucial to building a world class company. And while I had fantastic resources and opportunities to learn about startups and hypergrowth companies during my first year through Wharton and Wharton FinTech, living and working in Silicon Valley showed me that there is so much that goes into making a successful technology company that my peers and I don’t get exposure to as MBA students. Working with world class designers, engineers, product managers and the rest of my colleagues over the summer gave me a sense for where some of these gaps in my knowledge were. The many conversations I had with my Wealthfront teammates over Blue Bottle Coffee in downtown Palo Alto gave me insight into what they do every day and where I can learn more. And because Wealthfront is led by executives from Facebook, LinkedIn, Twitter, Greylock, and many other Silicon Valley institutions  —  people who have built and invested in billion dollar businesses  —  I felt I had to take full advantage of their knowledge. So I also reached out directly to them to get recommendations on the best places to read about their respective domains from the perspective of someone without specific knowledge of their role and how they think. As a result, I’ve put together what I now call the MBA Startup Reading List: a collection of books (and a few blog posts) that constitute the...

The 5-Minute MBA: Takeaways From Top Business Books...

Who has time to read anymore? Except for billionaires of course, somehow they always find time to read books, newspapers, and the Robb Report. It must be nice to be one of the few lucky people with the financial freedom to spend an hour each day for reading, thinking, and self-improvement. How can ordinary mortals with less than 3 commas ever catch up to them? Getting an MBA at business school helps, but that costs $100,000 and two years. Reading a lot of books is equivalent to an MBA, but then again, if people had time to read entire books they would already be financially independent and not need to read said books. The rich only get richer, because they read! So, as a small personal contribution to the struggle against wealth inequality, we came up with a solution. Compile the top investing and business books and summarize each with a one-sentence takeaway. Absorbing our list of takeaways provides almost all the benefits of reading the books, but only requires five minutes. For example, if we were listing the best movies of each decade and its key takeaway, the first entry would be: The 5-Minute MBA: 90’s movies Passenger 57, starring Wesley Snipes: Always bet on black Now, for your education and amusement, “The 5-minute MBA”. The 5-Minute MBA: Stocks Security Analysis by Benjamin Graham and David Dodd: Use fundamental analysis and buy below intrinsic value The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham: Buy with a margin of safety from Mr. Market Berkshire Hathaway Annual Letters by Warren Buffett: Value investing works Money Masters by John Train: Value investing works with different investors Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits by Philip Fisher: Buy companies that grow Margin of Safety by Seth...