Articles from The Guardian

Female MBA graduates lack ambition of male counterparts, says study...

The most highly qualified female business graduates lack the ambition of male counterparts in sectors such as engineering, manufacturing and natural resources, new research suggests. Some 84% of women taking management jobs in “tech-intensive” industries immediately after gaining a master’s in business administration (MBA) aspired to a senior executive or chief executive role, compared with 97% of men, according to a global study of almost 6,000 MBA graduates by research group Catalyst. The report was released in a week when Moya Greene, chief executive of Royal Mail and one of only five female chief executives in the FTSE 100, blamed cultural and societal expectations for blunting the aspirations of many businesswomen. Greene told an event to launch the “25 by 25” campaign, which is targeting 25 female FTSE 100 chief executives by 2025: “One of the most important things to do is to help women take ownership of their ambition and aspirations. It’s still disappointing when you see how young women view their ambition – and how others view that ambition. To be a CEO it’s really hard work and you really have to want to do it. For women, even in 2014, that can be a problem.” The findings suggesting that the top female business graduates lack the ambition of males in the technical sectors contradicts findings from other areas of commerce where studies frequently show that women are just as likely to aspire to the top jobs as men. Allyson Zimmermann, a senior director at Catalyst, said: “A lack of role models is certainly one contributory factor. Only 15% of the women and men in business roles in technology-intensive industries had a female supervisor compared with 21% in other industries. Women were more than twice as likely...