The MBA

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Why B-Schools Struggle to Enroll More Women

Today, women are almost as likely as men to fill the seats of medical school and law school classrooms. Yet the share of women enrolled in MBA programs hasn’t risen above 37.2 percent in the past decade, according to the more than 100 schools providing full-time MBA enrollment figures in surveys by AACSB International, an accrediting organization. “There’s a frustration on the part of a lot of women, and probably men, too, that we haven’t made more progress,” says Amy Hillman, the dean at Arizona State University’s W.P. Carey School of Business. In August the White House convened 150 leaders from top business schools and had them sign a pledge to take steps to boost female enrollment by cultivating potential applicants early on in their education and by offering more financial aid. “When business schools are missing out on a large share of female college graduates, they are missing out on an extremely large share of the top qualified college graduates,” says Betsey Stevenson, a University of Michigan economist who served on President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers and helped lead the August summit. “If they want to continue to be a relevant part of the training in the 21st century, they are going to have to make changes that will make them more attractive to women.” Deans say business schools suffer from a unique timing problem. Unlike law and medical schools, which tend to enroll students soon after they finish college, the full-time MBA program is designed for people who’ve already proved themselves professionally. Elite B-schools typically prefer that applicants have about five years of work experience, which means the average MBA student is 30 years old at graduation, Bloomberg data show. Women in their late 20s who...

Online Tool Helps Prospective Students Find the Right MBA Program...

Prospective MBA students have a new tool to use when trying to find the right school: the “MBA Rankings Calculator.” Designed by the University of Washington’s Foster School of Business, the web-based tool allows users to create a custom list of MBA programs by choosing the factors that matter most to them, including salary and placement, employer reputation, and return on investment. Around 250,000 students in the US pursue an MBA each year, and according the US Department of Education the average cost for a year in an MBA program is $30,000. That means the MBA market amounts to more than $8 billion annually. It’s a big business and rankings play a strong role in guiding early decision-making. The Foster School’s Rankings Calculator was developed to help MBA applicants make informed decisions and access diverse rankings metrics in one convenient place. Prospective and current MBA students helped shape the calculator design and select the metrics. “Obviously, we urge MBA candidates to always consider the culture, the community, the location, the student services, program performance and other areas that matter to them when choosing an MBA program,” said Dan Poston, assistant dean of master’s programs at the Foster School. “But we know for nearly all candidates the rankings are a consideration. Not only does this tool help them filter data from multiple rankings to see the results that that are most important to them…it’s just fun to explore how school rankings change based on different priorities.” To achieve this, the calculator leverages data licensed from U.S. News & World Report, Bloomberg Businessweek, The Financial Times, Forbes and M7 Financial. Prospective applicants distribute 100 points across up to 10 metrics. Based on the results, candidates can fine-tune their formula to develop...

These 6 Sloan Startups Are so MIT

When it comes to ground-breaking scientific discoveries and technological developments, MIT kills it. But the accolades in those areas sometimes might overshadow the fact that the Institute fosters stellar businesses, as well. Sloan is a big name among business schools, and its students have launched many a startup that are just so MIT. Let’s celebrate these Sloan startups: Here’s a list of some of the most interesting startups from the B school – both current student ventures, along with spin-outs. Insurify This Sloan spin-out is taking car insurance into the 21st Century. Insurify has already made waves with its auto insurance shopping platform, which includes a virtual insurance agent – Evia – who’s there to help. The venture secured $2 million in seed funding in January, so it’s off to a steady start. GoodSIRS The recent winner of MIT Sloan’s Healthcare Innovation Prize, GoodSIRS is trying to save millions of lives each year with its filtration treatment for sepsis. The common, fatal condition occurs when people’s bodies go into overdrive trying to fight an infection, causing organ failure. With GoodSIRS’ selective filtration technology, we’ll be able to remove the offending chemicals from the bloodstream and prevent deaths from sepsis. Gomango Here in the U.S., we walk into a grocery store, peruse the produce section and think nothing of it. In developing nations where refrigeration is lacking, a significant portion of food spoils before it makes it to market. Gomango is creating a network of rental cooling boxes in India that would let farmers prevent food spoilage, sell more at markets and even transport their products to areas further away to be more lucrative. EarID We love talking about what’s good and not good for your health, yet we know...

Is Business School Worth the Money?

Over time, MBAs earn $1 million more than non-MBAs, says a new study. If you’re on the fence about whether to spend the time and money to pursue a graduate business degree, a new report from the Graduate Management Admission Council could help you decide—including what kind of program might give you the biggest returns. Based on a survey of 14,279 alumni of 275 MBA programs worldwide, the study says these MBAs reported base salaries that totaled $1 million more over the two decades following graduation than if they had not gone to B-school. GMAC’s calculations show that, even taking into account the opportunity cost of two years of lost pay, people who graduate from two-year, full-time MBA programs recoup their investment, on average, in three-and-a-half years. Can’t take two years away from your job (and spend an average of $105,000 in tuition, in addition to lost pay)? That’s not necessarily a problem since, the report says,“graduates with lower investment costs tend to recoup their expenses more quickly and show a larger ROI.” For instance, MBAs who got their degree part-time, at an average tuition cost of $25,000, took just two-and-a-half years to earn back their investment, as did executive MBA grads who paid roughly the same tuition. After five years, the two groups reported total ROIs (including pay increases minus the cost of their degrees) of 221% and 491%, respectively. By contrast, because their MBAs cost so much more, the full-time two-year students’ five-year ROI was 132%—still not too shabby—and climbed to 445% only after an average of 10 years. In all, 89% of the alums said their MBAs have proved “professionally rewarding,” and 9 out of 10 said they’d go to B-school if they had it to...

63 MBA Grads Raised $15bn In Venture Capital For Their $65bn ‘Unicorn’ startups...

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The best business school for your money may surprise you...

In December Business Insider released its sixth annual list of the 50 best business schools in the world — the schools whose MBA programs have the best reputations, highest starting salaries, lowest tuitions, and best job-placement rates. Brigham Young University’s Marriott School of Management came in at No. 44 on our overall list. It’s the least expensive US program and least expensive two-year program, and it took first place on our list of the best business schools for your money, making it one of the most underrated MBA programs out there. “When you consider the low cost of the degree, scholarships and high starting salaries, the quality of the education — it’s a very economical MBA program choice,” BYU MBA program director John Bingham told Business Insider. We decided to take a closer look. BYU Marriott School of ManagementFacebook/BYU Marriott School of Management The cost of the degree The tuition and fees for the entire program totals just $47,900. That’s less than half the price of top MBA programs at most private schools in the US and three times less than the $144,340 price tag of The Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania, the top school on our ranking. Brigham Young, which is subsidized by the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints, is even cheaper for members of the church: LDS students pay less than $25,000 for an MBA. On top of that, more than 80% of students receive additional scholarship funding of at least a few thousand dollars, so many graduate with little debt. High placement and competitive salaries Three months after graduation, 92% of students have accepted job offers, and another 5% start their own viable companies. BYU puts a large emphasis on entrepreneurship, and...

Here’s Why You Don’t Need an MBA to Get Ahead in Business...

There are other paths to the corner office. The Leadership Insider network is an online community where the most thoughtful and influential people in business contribute answers to timely questions about careers and leadership. Today’s answer to the question: Career wise, is it better to be book smart or street smart? is written by Suri Suriyakumar, chairman, president and CEO of ARC Document Solutions. While I would never discount the value of a formal, advanced education, my personal experience shows that life experience, combined with hard work, a desire to succeed, and a willingness to take risks, can lead to the corner office. I deviated from the norm from the beginning. In what was probably one of the biggest risks I’ve ever taken: I decided to pursue a non-traditional — and rather circuitous — path to a career in business. My father was the first person from his village in Sri Lanka to get a college degree, and all of my siblings followed his lead, pursuing college degrees as well. But I bypassed the college and business school route in favor of the school of hard knocks. I attended a marine academy so that I could repair ships and sail the world. I quickly became street smart—or perhaps it would be more accurate to say that I became “sea smart”. I found that I liked to lead but not necessarily from a ship’s boiler room. So I left the sailor’s life behind and joined an executive training program at an international conglomerate. I had the benefit of working with a wonderful mentor who helped me grow, drive new projects, and make my way rather quickly to a directorship…Read full story:...

Here Are Poets&Quants Top MBA Startups

Do you need an MBA to do a successful startup? Of course not. But when it comes to using an MBA experience to launch a company, you won’t get much of an argument from the business school graduates whose companies have landed on Poets&Quants’ third annual ranking of the Top 100 MBA Startups. For the first time since the rankings were created, the top spot goes to a venture that had not already been sold. SoFi, a Stanford-founded student loan refinancing company, charged to the top of this year’s list with a monstrous $1.4 billion raised for operations in the past five years. Their leap up the rankings was anchored by a $1 billion Series E round announced last September. Next was GrabTaxi, the Southeastern Asia taxi booking app founded by a team from Harvard, with $680 million in venture backing. Rounding out the top three was Stanford-founded RelateIQ, which was acquired by Salesforce for $390 million and is now SalesforceIQ. Cultural Moment or Frothy VC Market? While SoFi and Grabtaxi certainly set the pace in the race for later series funding, they were not the only two startups to make big moves this year. Harvard-founded Oscar Insurance zoomed from $150 million and ninth place last year to $327.5 million and fourth place this year. Wharton-founded razor venture, Harry’s, nudged up one spot to fifth this year, with $287 million in total funding. And PillPack, founded by an MIT Sloan School of Management team, catapulted from 70th to 13th, with total backing of $62.8 million. Whether they’re enjoying a cultural moment or a frothy venture capital market, startup fever on business school campuses has never been hotter. Last year, 84 out of the 908 graduating MBAs from Harvard launched...

Insead tops ‘Financial Times’ MBA rankings...

Insead, the business school with campuses in France, Singapore and Abu Dhabi, has topped the Financial Times’ Global MBA rankings for the first time since they were introduced in 1999. This is the first time that an MBA programme with a substantial Asian presence has been ranked number one by the Financial Times , and marks a growing interest from elite students in Asian business and business schools. Insead is still the only top-ranked business school to teach its full-time MBA on multiple campuses, with 75 per cent of the 1,000 students studying in Singapore or in Fontainebleau, just outside Paris. It is also the first time a one-year MBA programme has been ranked in the top slot. The flagship MBA programmes of the four previous winners – Harvard Business School, Stanford GSB and the Wharton School at the University of Pennsylvania in the US, and London Business School in the UK – are all two-year degrees. These schools have been ranked in the top five slots along with Insead for the past three years by the FT. The full-time MBA programme at UCD Michael Smurfit Graduate Business School has been ranked 79th in the world and 24th in Europe in the survey. The school had been ranked 73rd in the 2015 rankings. The Insead MBA was the world’s first one-year programme when it began in 1959, though many others have followed. As the cost of studying for an MBA has steadily risen, many students are wary of taking on the debt associated with two-year degrees – students are frequently more than $100,000 in debt when they graduate. Though fees and living costs can be substantial, it is often the opportunity cost of lost salary that is the biggest...

Consider a Second MBA Degree

The idea of pursuing a second MBA degree may sound strange, but it happens with a small number of applicants during every admissions season and can make sense under the right, very specific, circumstances. Some applicants consider a second degree after earning an MBA from a for-profit university or an unaccredited program. They may find they have hit a ceiling with their employment prospects as they vie for positions against candidates from better-known schools. More often, people who seek a second degree are international candidates who have discovered that their professional dreams cannot be fulfilled with their current degree alone. In India, for example, it’s common for a student to jump into an MBA program straight out of university, which makes for a very theoretical learning experience rather than a practical one in which to contextualize management problems. Once these MBA grads get into the workforce, they discover they must further develop various skills to become strong business leaders. For professionals working in international firms who aspire to relocate abroad, a degree earned in-country will not open doors the way a highly ranked MBA from a name-brand university will. A second MBA is seen as an efficient way to move out of a stagnant career and enhance their competitiveness, allowing the degree holder to shift into a new function, industry or geography after completing their studies. Creating a rich classroom experience through diversity is a huge focus of the top business schools, offering students the opportunity to interact with peers from an array of countries and professional backgrounds. While the educational component of the degree in South Asian business schools, for example, may sometimes rival their international counterparts, the ability to create networking ties across the globe is nowhere...

MBA programmes that yield the best salaries

One major component of Business Insider’s ranking is the average starting salary. Looking at this exclusively, you can filter out the business schools that yield the best salaries after graduation. Among the 50 leading schools, students from 22 schools went on achieving base salaries over 100,000 US-Dollar. Although Stanford placed fourth on the overall list, its graduates earn the highest starting salaries of all the schools, averaging more than 133,000 US-Dollar. Other high achievers like Harvard and Wharton fared well as well. Harvard graduates earn an average of more than 131,000 US-Dollar after school and Wharton graduates average on more than 127,000 US-Dollar, though Wharton’s tuition cost also amounts to 144,340 US-Dollar. The Wharton School topped the Business Insider ranking overall in 2015 for all-around excellence (see article above). Wharton’s salary expectation is similar to Columbia Business School’s as well as Sloan School of Management’s and the Booth School of Business’s. Graduates of Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business follow with an average starting salary of 123,900 US-Dollar. Amongst the 22 schools are many more well-known schools like the Anderson School of Management, the Fuqua School of Business, Yale School of Management, London Business School, Darden Business School, the Booth School of Business or the Kellogg School of Management. But other not as well-known universities do well in the salary category as well. Graduates from the Foster School of Business, the Jones Graduate School of Business or the McCombs School of Business also break the ranks of the 100,000 US-Dollarfor example. Read full story: MBA...

Don’t Rush The MBA Decision: Not All Work Experience Is Created Equal...

We all know some things look good on paper but don’t always work in practice. And that sentiment should be taken into consideration when deciding if the time is right for an MBA. Just because you have the two years of experience that many of the world’s business schools require, doesn’t mean you are ready for an MBA. You should think more deeply about how to get the most out of your investment of time and money before applying to an MBA. We often see applicants rush this decision. At the Ivey Business School, we believe that a key question candidates should be asking themselves before applying to an MBA is: Does it make sense for me to get this degree right now? Here are some things to consider: 1.The admissions teams can help: The admissions team at Ivey is not in place to scrutinize or judge applicants. Instead, an important part of the team’s role is to ensure that you make the best decision possible, so you can get the most out of the program and contribute to the class community in a meaningful way. Where you are at in your own work journey before you arrive is a critical part of a successful outcome. Talk to us. We can help; 2.Quality over quantity: Be prepared to talk about the kind of work you have done. We are not interested in the length of time you have spent collecting a paycheque, but instead your ability to talk about the quality of work you have done. Tell us about the interactions you have experienced with internal or external clients and the projects you have contributed to moving forward. Bringing these kinds of experiences to formal classroom discussions is a...