Diverse MBA

Doors open for gay MBA graduates

Nick Deakin had a very specific reason for going to business school. After working as a doctor for two and a half years at Barts hospital in central London, he enrolled on an MBA because he thought a commercial career would suit him better as a gay man. “When I was a medical student I did some work with McKinsey and I felt part of a strong network,” he says. “It was fantastic.” Indeed, the atmosphere in consultancy was far more positive to those who are LGBT+ (lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender and queer) than that in the medical profession, he adds. On graduating from London Business School he opted for banking, joining the healthcare group at Citi. “I am out at work. I talk about my partner,” he says. “I think it is my duty as someone who is out to talk about it.” Though investment banking is a tried and tested career path for MBA graduates, its reputation as a testosterone-ridden industry often deters those from the LGBT+ community, believes Matt Kidd, executive director of Reaching Out MBA (Romba), the non-profit set up 20 years ago by students from Harvard and Yale to promote the interests of MBA participants who identify as LGBT+. One of Romba’s missions is to help change the perception surrounding finance and business. “How do you convince graduates that business school is the place for them?” he asks. “For business schools it is becoming a priority.”… Read full story: Financial...

The 25 Business Schools With The Most Diverse Students...

In today’s global economy, business leaders interact with people from all locations and backgrounds, making cultural literacy and sensitivity an important skill. This means attending a business school with a diverse student body is more helpful than ever in preparing students for the business world. “Even if your program is small, you will inevitably meet people who are not like you. And that’s a good thing,” Graduateprograms.com explains on its blog. “Education is not just about what happens when the professor speaks; it’s about the whole picture, the entire experience, which involves the choices you make about the people you surround yourself with when class is dismissed.” To help students find the most diverse b-school programs, Graduateprograms.com looked at reviews from over 70,000 former and currently enrolled graduate students. On the site, students rate their schools on a 10-point scale across several categories, including academic competitiveness, career support, quality of network, social life, and student diversity. The schools with the highest ratings for student diversity were then pulled and ranked. The top schools for diversity at b-schools in the United States, according to graduate students: 1.) Duke University 2.) TIE: University of Pennsylvania and Yale University 3.) University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Read full story: Businessinsider...