MBA Rankings

For a general idea of the programs available, rankings provide a good place to start – they are subjective and far from perfect, but useful. There is a lot of controversy about the different methodologies and the big differences in the rankings by different people, so it is a good idea to look beyond them.

Best Business Schools 2014: Duke Tops Full-Time MBA List, Harvard Slips...

There is a new top dog in American business education: Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business. The Durham (N.C.)-based school has claimed the No. 1 spot in Bloomberg Businessweek‘s 14th biennial ranking of full-time MBA programs, part of a shakeup that dethroned University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business and also knocked elite rival Harvard Business School out of the top five for the first time in the history of the ranking. Fuqua, which was ranked No. 6 in the most recent Businessweek ranking, rose to the top spot, thanks in large part to employers’ esteem for its graduates. Bloomberg Businessweek ranks schools on three measures: how company recruiters rate MBA hires in a survey that accounts for 45 percent of each school’s score; how graduating MBAs judge their program in a separate survey that makes up an additional 45 percent; and a tally of faculty research published in esteemed journals, which constitutes the remaining 10 percent. We changed our employer survey from the last ranking cycle to better reflect the breadth of the recruiting landscape and to collect more data on how well MBAs do in the workplace. Some 1,300 recruiters were surveyed, up from 206 in 2012, and they were asked to rate schools on how well their graduates performed in the areas most important to employers. Fuqua students got high marks from recruiters, particularly those from companies that hire large numbers of MBAs, and these were given additional weight in the ranking. In our survey, recruiters noted that Fuqua students are exceptionally good at working collaboratively. “To be a great leader, you need to be great in a team setting, and I think that’s where we get credit from employers,” says Fuqua’s dean, Bill Boulding. Students...

MBA Rankings: Online And Full-Time Programs’ Ranks Demystified...

Business schools go to great lengths to improve their programs’ MBA rankings, which is probably motivated by how much value MBA candidates place in them. Where a school is placed in a certain ranking greatly influences applicants’ study choices. Rankings are one of a few ways in which business schools are utilizing big data, collating information on everything from career statistics to faculty credentials. The big rankings providers – the FT, Bloomberg Businessweek and The Economist, to name but a few – also muster considerable resources to deploy this data to the business school world. So you should probably understand how each ranking is formed, to better inform your choices. The graphic below, provided by the Whitman School of Management, provides an overview of how five major publications are ranking the world’s MBA programs – for both online and on-campus courses. Read full story:...

The world’s best business programmes

For the fourth time in five years, the University of Chicago’s Booth School of Business tops The Economist’s ranking of full-time MBA programmes. Even as banking jobs have become scarcer, Chicago, famed for its prowess in finance, has maintained a strong record of placing students in work. Last year 94% of graduates were employed within three months of leaving. Fifteen of the top 20 schools are American. However, HEC Paris, the top European school, has climbed four places to fourth, mostly because of the impressive salaries its graduates get. The University of Queensland is the top-ranked school outside America and Europe. This is the 12th time we have published the ranking. Each year we ask students why they decided to take an MBA. Our ranking weights data according to what they say is important. The four categories covered are: opening new career opportunities (35%); personal development/educational experience (35%); increasing salary (20%); and the potential to network (10%). The figures we collate are a mixture of hard data and subjective marks given by the students.Read full story: The...

MBA Rankings Lose Lustre As Business Education Becomes Global...

As business schools compete to lure the best students and the education market becomes more global, being able to distinguish the best MBA programs for the rest is becoming more difficult. When it comes to the top-100, MBA rankings are most applicants’ preferred source of information, with the US continuing to dominate most lists followed by Western Europe. But there have been new regions creeping into the framework, as emerging markets have rolled out high quality courses with an international focus. The US and UK may not be able to rely on their revered status for much longer. Canada and Australia have been gaining ground in the education race and schools including AGSM of Sydney and the Sauder School of Business in Vancouver have helped edge several MBA programs into the league tables. Meanwhile, European countries including Belgium and Germany have proven fertile breeding ground for business master’s degrees and both think they can rival the traditional MBA markets. The rise of Latin America with business schools such as Coppead of Brazil, have entered the fray with a unique focus on entrepreneurship and social impact, while China and wider Asia are attracting a growing slice of the MBA market with booming economies and a growing entrepreneurial scene. And the few shining stars of India, a country which has seen hundreds of its second-tier business schools forced to close down due to a lack of enrolment, offer western students something new. For entrepreneurship, candidates are now looking to countries including Mexico and Brazil, countries that are moving away from a focus on academic and technical skills to one of entrepreneurship, innovation and social responsibility. “Globalization is changing how businesses are run, and is also forcing business schools to evaluate their...

The 25 Business Schools With The Most Diverse Students...

In today’s global economy, business leaders interact with people from all locations and backgrounds, making cultural literacy and sensitivity an important skill. This means attending a business school with a diverse student body is more helpful than ever in preparing students for the business world. “Even if your program is small, you will inevitably meet people who are not like you. And that’s a good thing,” Graduateprograms.com explains on its blog. “Education is not just about what happens when the professor speaks; it’s about the whole picture, the entire experience, which involves the choices you make about the people you surround yourself with when class is dismissed.” To help students find the most diverse b-school programs, Graduateprograms.com looked at reviews from over 70,000 former and currently enrolled graduate students. On the site, students rate their schools on a 10-point scale across several categories, including academic competitiveness, career support, quality of network, social life, and student diversity. The schools with the highest ratings for student diversity were then pulled and ranked. The top schools for diversity at b-schools in the United States, according to graduate students: 1.) Duke University 2.) TIE: University of Pennsylvania and Yale University 3.) University of Michigan, Ann Arbor Read full story: Businessinsider...

The Top 10 MBA Schools in Canada

Canadian Business’s 23rd annual MBA Guide has everything you need to pick the right program for you. An MBA is an investment in yourself, and you should get a decent return. The MBA programs on this list combine competitive value, solid classroom experience and good name recognition. But—like any ranking—it’s only part of the picture. The right program for you is one that meets your needs—whether that’s regional expertise, specialized subjects, industry connections or flexible scheduling. 10: Ted Rogers School of Management Ryerson University, Toronto 9. Asper School of Business University of Manitoba, Winnipeg 8. Haskayne School of Business University of Calgary, Calgary 7. Telfer School of Management University of Ottawa, Ottawa 6. Gustavson School of Business University of Victoria, Victoria 5. Alberta School of Business University of Alberta, Edmonton 4. John Molson School of Business Concordia University, Montreal 3. Schulich School of Business York University, Toronto 2. HEC Montreal Montreal 1. Queen’s School of Business Queen’s University, Kingston Read full story:...

Is there a Jesuit B-school rankings conspiracy?...

Peculiar results in U.S. News’ specialty MBA rankings have led to speculation that Jesuit schools may be gaming the system, particularly since they are based solely on a survey of business school officials. (Poets&Quants) — Jesuit colleges are popping up in surprising places—that is, surprising places on the U.S. News & World Report MBA specialty rankings. Take Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, and its Erivan K. Haub School of Business. Haub, according to U.S. News, is 16th-best in America for marketing, beating out Dartmouth’s Tuck School of Business and Cornell’s Johnson School of Management, both tied at No. 17. Yet Haub is nowhere to be found on the U.S. News’ ranking of the top 100 business schools, while Tuck ranks at No. 9 and Johnson is 17th on the list. Now consider Saint Louis University’s Cook School of Business, the self-proclaimed “Oldest Business School West of the Mississippi.” U.S. News anoints Cook 13th best for supply chain/logistics, ahead of Harvard Business School at No. 15. Cook also comes out tied at 14th in entrepreneurship, alongside the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill’s Kenan-Flagler Business School, and above Columbia Business School and the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business, both tied at 17. Cook is also absent from the U.S. News top 100 business schools list, while Harvard holds the No. 1 spot, Darden sits at No. 11, and UNC-Chapel Hill comes in at No. 19. Or look at Seattle University’s Albers School of Business and Economics, 14th in U.S. News’ specialty ranking for accounting. That puts Albers on equal footing with Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management and U.C. Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. Albers makes no appearance in the U.S. News overall top 100, while Kellogg ranks 6th...

School Gave US News Inaccurate MBA Ranking Data...

University of Florida Warrington College of Business supplied the magazine with inaccurate job-placement data, resulting in a higher ranking Less than four months after learning that Villanova law school tried to game its rankings, U.S. News & World Report is confronting another ranking scandal, this one involving its b-school list. The Gainesville Sun last night reported that the University of Florida Warrington College of Business supplied the magazine with inaccurate job-placement data, resulting in a higher ranking. An anonymous complaint made through the university’s ethics hotline in August alleged that 37 percent of UF’s 2009 MBA graduating class had jobs at graduation, while 53 percent had jobs three months later. The figures supplied to USNWR indicated 53 percent placement at graduation and 79 percent three months later. UF was ranked 39th in 2009, falling two spots from the year before; in 2010 it fell to 47th. A report of an internal investigation [investigation report.pdf] obtained by Bloomberg Businessweek found no evidence of collusion or deliberate intent to distort the data. But the report, authored by Angel Kwolek-Folland, associate provost for academic affairs, found that several graduates were listed as employed based on questionable documentation, and several more were listed as “not seeking employment” when in fact they were. “In this case, the principals appear to have used a looser interpretation of the data than would a reasonable person using the same standards,” Kwolek-Folland wrote, referring to the standards for placement statistics created by the MBA Career Services Council. “Whether this was the result of poor judgment or inexperience, the end result is an inaccurate portrait of the employment profile of 2009 WCBA MBA graduates.” In a memo by Warrington Dean John Kraft [Dean’s response.pdf], the school maintains that it...

MBA Rankings: A Better Way

Media rankings of MBA programs do a poor job of assessing quality. Three professors propose a rating system that allows users to define the terms To say that MBA programs have undergone significant changes over the past three decades is an understatement. There have been dramatic shifts in approaches, curricula, and the overall MBA experience, all with a decidedly student-centric focus. Media rankings, such as those published by Bloomberg Businessweek, have played an influential role in this transformation by shining a light into an insular academic world, opening it up to scrutiny and increased accountability. In particular, rankings have shown business schools they must operate within a larger environment, one in which multiple stakeholders (students, businesses, society at large) have a vested interest in the educational process. To be certain, business schools now understand this message and have set a course to work on improving their MBA offerings. Yet for all the good that has come from the rise of rankings, our research suggests that ranking systems fall short of achieving their primary objective, which is to summarize comprehensively educational or academic quality”the most fundamental product of any MBA program. Despite decades of discussion, a complete understanding of MBA program quality has yet to be achieved. Accordingly, we recently completed a project to define MBA program quality exhaustively (read a short summary here). Put simply, our findings suggest that MBA quality is multifaceted, and although rankings capture some important aspects of academic quality (e.g., student economic outcomes), they fail to assess adequately a number of critical features of the educational process, such as the quality of curricula, educational environment, and student learning, to name a few…Read full...

Making the Most of Business School Rankings

Choosing a B-school can be a gamble. MBA applicants shouldn’t rely on rankings alone, but the data they include are a valuable resource, admissions experts say Whenever business school rankings are released by any publication, readers flock to the Bloomberg Businessweek Business Schools Forum to analyze the lists.At the moment, forum participants are debating the order of business schools in U.S. News and World Report’s latest ranking. So far, 44 messages populate the discussion thread, and many suggest different ways to rank the programs, each participant bringing his own preferences to the discussion. Admissions directors at top schools and consultants who advise B-school applicants agree that many B-school hopefuls rely too much on the rankings and get caught up in the lists instead of the more valuable data that come with them. They warn that this can ruin a business school application, because admissions committees are unimpressed when applicants have chosen them simply because their school is No. 5 on a certain publication’s annual list. “Stop thinking of them as rankings of anything,” says Linda Abraham, president of Accepted.com, an admissions consulting firm in Los Angeles. “They are collections of data and surveys. They are opinions.” Still, rankings serve a purpose in the application process and can be valuable to MBA candidates who know how to use them properly while keeping the lists themselves in perspective, say admissions experts. Business school rankings are available free online, which can help people save money on admissions consultants, says Sara Neher, assistant dean for MBA admissions at the University of Virginia’s Darden School of Business (Darden Full-Time MBA Profile). “Use rankings to figure out where to apply,” she says. “Don’t use them to decide where to go.” What Each Ranking Measures Indeed,...

Global MBA Rankings 2011 released

London Business School and Wharton tied at #1 The top 20 Global MBA programs, according to Financial Times: 1. London Business School – UK 1. University of Pennsylvania Wharton – USA 3. Harvard Business School – USA 4. INSEAD – France/Singapore 4. Stanford GSB – USA 6. Hong Kong UST Business School – China 7. Columbia Business School – USA 8. IE Business School – Spain 9. MIT Sloan – USA 9. IESE Business School – Spain 11. Indian Institute of Management Ahmedabad (IIMA) – India 12. Chicago Booth – USA 13. Indian School of Business – India 14. IMD – Switzerland 15. New York University Stern – USA 15. Yale School of Management – USA 17. Ceibs – China 18. Dartmouth Tuck – USA 18. HEC Paris – France 20. Duke Fuqua – USARead full...