MBA Job Search

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You will probably spend a lot of time working on the job search. This section should complement the information you will get from your school’s placement office, in order to understand and prepare better for each step

Resume Tips for MBAs

A great resume is not just a complete list of employment and education. . . it’s got to be a selling document Resume Tips “A great resume is not just a complete list of employment and education. . . it’s got to be a selling document,” says Kathryn Troutman, president of The Resume Place in Catonsville and author of the Federal Resume Guidebook. “Your resume needs to make very clear that you are highly skilled and an excellent candidate for their position, with energy and enthusiasm for your career,” Ms. Troutman adds. “A resume is like a snapshot,” agrees Nancy Leaderman, one of two resume specialists (along with Debra Varron) at The Associated’s Jewish Vocational Service, which offers a full range of employment counseling and programs, including resume preparation and job-seeking workshops. “You wouldn’t have a picture of yourself taken without combing your hair, putting on lipstick, or whatever it takes to make yourself look as attractive as possible. It’s the same thing with a resume. . .this is your first impression.” In terms of the visual appeal of a resume, says Ms. Leaderman, a resume produced on a laser printer makes a big difference. “A good dot matrix printer used to be all right,” she observes, “but with the availability of computers so widespread now, a laser printer is really the way to go.” Ms. Leaderman admits that the way a resume looks can be tied to the field the job seeker is exploring. “I think of resumes as akin to professional dressing,” she observes. “A resume for the banking industry might certainly look different from a resume for the advertising industry. “In more conservative areas,” Ms. Leaderman notes, “you won’t waver from 12-point black ink on white...

Job Discontent Has MBAs Moving On

MBACareers.com Asks, “What do companies need to do to retain MBA’s?” According to a poll released today by MBACareers.com, over two-thirds of MBA qualified employees are not satisfied with their current jobs and are seeking new positions. The results of the poll reveal that MBAs’ criteria for job satisfaction are challenging work, competitive compensation, and respect from their employers. “Companies spend thousands of dollars recruiting MBAs, yet employers may risk losing these valuable employees by not offering challenging work and advancement opportunities,” said JillXan Donnelly of MBACareers.com. “Losing employees – especially top notch MBAs – almost always results in significant costs to the corporation. Companies can’t afford to lose these talented resources.” MBACareers.com viewers were asked why their current position is “uninspiring.” The results are: Lack of advancement opportunities64% Lack of “fit”62% Not intellectually challenging39% Weakness of direction on behalf of Senior management18% What do companies need to do to engage their MBA’s? According to MBACareers.com, companies need to focus on finding challenging and fulfilling employment opportunities for these fast-track employees. MBAs are almost always over-achievers. They have been challenged academically, they have excelled and they expect the same in their professional environments. Give your MBAs responsibility for impacting the bottom line, challenge them to stretch their boundaries and reward their progress. Meet with your MBAs on a regular basis to ascertain their career expectations and learn if their needs are being met. Broad management experience is a must for fast-track candidates. Make sure that your corporation offers a variety of experiences, advancement opportunities and responsibilities. Job satisfaction is a key factor in employee retention. These MBAs are your future business leaders. Allow them to prove their worth to your corporation. If you don’t your competition will. Read full...

MBAs – What are they good for?

If everyone has an MBA then what’s the point? The so called ‘fast track’ will simply become a main highway, clogged up with people going slow in the outside lane There’s been a lot of discussion around the world recently, about the proliferation of MBAs. Many people believe that too many educational institutions are offering too many MBA programs, and too many ‘would be managers’ are lapping them up in an effort to get themselves on the ‘fast track’. If everyone has an MBA, they ask, then what’s the point? The so called ‘fast track’ will simply become a main highway, clogged up with people going slow in the outside lane. Others, noting the plethora of programs, question whether they’re all up to the mark. The Australian Graduate School of Management’s Dr John Toohey for example, has gone so far as to call for government intervention to control the MBA market. He wants to ensure that the ‘quality of the degree and the overall perception of it’ are not ‘undermined’. So, are MBA students getting what they paid for? Well, it depends on what they thought they were buying in the first place. Which begs the question: exactly why do large numbers of people – who appear otherwise to be quite sane – voluntarily give up large chunks of their hard earned, and even larger chunks of their lives, to get an MBA? The short answer is that they want to have a better job, and get paid more money. All of the hundreds of different opinions and survey responses and beating around the bush won’t change that one truth. MBA students are, by and large, people who want a better long term quality of life, and are prepared...