MBA Academics

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If you take the networking, career search and fun from the MBA, what’s left ? Classes, of course. Your tuition should cover all the basics, but we have compiled a few resources you might find useful for your research.

The 5-Minute MBA: Takeaways From Top Business Books...

Who has time to read anymore? Except for billionaires of course, somehow they always find time to read books, newspapers, and the Robb Report. It must be nice to be one of the few lucky people with the financial freedom to spend an hour each day for reading, thinking, and self-improvement. How can ordinary mortals with less than 3 commas ever catch up to them? Getting an MBA at business school helps, but that costs $100,000 and two years. Reading a lot of books is equivalent to an MBA, but then again, if people had time to read entire books they would already be financially independent and not need to read said books. The rich only get richer, because they read! So, as a small personal contribution to the struggle against wealth inequality, we came up with a solution. Compile the top investing and business books and summarize each with a one-sentence takeaway. Absorbing our list of takeaways provides almost all the benefits of reading the books, but only requires five minutes. For example, if we were listing the best movies of each decade and its key takeaway, the first entry would be: The 5-Minute MBA: 90’s movies Passenger 57, starring Wesley Snipes: Always bet on black Now, for your education and amusement, “The 5-minute MBA”. The 5-Minute MBA: Stocks Security Analysis by Benjamin Graham and David Dodd: Use fundamental analysis and buy below intrinsic value The Intelligent Investor by Benjamin Graham: Buy with a margin of safety from Mr. Market Berkshire Hathaway Annual Letters by Warren Buffett: Value investing works Money Masters by John Train: Value investing works with different investors Common Stocks and Uncommon Profits by Philip Fisher: Buy companies that grow Margin of Safety by Seth...

MBA In Marijuana? Six Colleges Now Offer Courses...

Are you trying to make a decision about which major to choose and wish you could get an MBA in marijuana management? If so, your day has arrived. As the marijuana business becomes legal, colleges offering courses in the industry are following. In particular, six colleges have added classes in marijuana business management or law to their course offerings — and they promise that it is a better business decision than changing your name to Taylor Spliff like Diplo. The latest addition to this type of marijuana college education is Anne Arundel Community College in Arnold, Maryland. ABC News was the first to post about the decision the college made to offer a marijuana business class and interviewed the professor teaching the course. Shad Ewart stated that he felt “like we were doing a disservice to our students by not having a class like this.” Students currently attending Ewart’s class called “Entrepreneurial Opportunities in Emerging Markets: Marijuana Legalization,” will be educated on dealing with the finer points of sales and helping states to legalize marijuana. CBS News also covered the story about Anne Arundel Community College and said the marijuana business course offers information on the history of marijuana, tax and economic impact of legalization, and the regulatory issues surrounding marijuana…Read full story: The...

Harvard professor sorry for fighting restaurant over $4...

Harvard Business School associate professor Ben Edelman was in the running this week for “Most Disliked Guy on the Internet” — and all because of $4. After accusing a restaurant of overcharging him, Edelman began an epic back and forth with the management that went viral. Now, the professor is apologizing for letting the dispute spiral so out of control. According to Boston.com, the saga began last week when Edelman placed an order at a family-operated Boston-area Chinese restaurant named Sichuan Garden. He was hungry for sauteed prawns with roasted chili and peanut, stir-fried chicken with spicy capsicum, braised fish filets and napa cabbage with roasted chili, and shredded chicken with spicy garlic sauce. When he placed his order, Edelman thought his meal would run him $53.35. But when he checked his receipt, he noticed he’d been charged an additional $4 — or, as he noted in the first of several emails he sent to Sichuan Garden, an apparent “increase of $1 on each and every item.” Celebrated bartender Ran Duan, who manages the bar inside his parents’ Sichuan Garden location, was the one to respond to Edelman’s complaint. In doing so, he kicked off an epic three-day email exchange that ended with Edelman, who is also a lawyer and fashions himself as a “Web sheriff,” considering legal action against the restaurant. It turns out that the menu Edelman viewed on Sichuan Garden’s website was out of date, which Duan apologized for and said he would fix…Read full story:...

Rotman apologizes for ‘inappropriate’ MBA assignment...

The Rotman School of Management has formally apologized to its students following backlash over a sexist MBA assignment. The apology, issued by dean Tiff Macklem and obtained by the Star, acknowledged the assignment featuring a fictional shoe-obsessed female character was “inappropriate.” “The assignment unfortunately did not reflect the standards and commitment to diversity that are core beliefs at the Rotman School,” wrote Macklem. He said professors have apologized to the first-year finance students given the assignment and that it will not be used again. The Star reported on the assignment Sunday after being forwarded a copy by a dismayed student. It follows business student Elle Forest, who is contemplating accepting a public relations job at jeweller Tiffany and Co. “Confused about the subtleties of the offer,” Forest turns to her fiancé Chip, a Yale grad, for help. The assignment spells out different possible compensation packages and along the way refers to Forest’s love of Tiffany and designer shoes — “Sorry. I was dreaming of that pair of Louboutins,” she tells her boyfriend at one point, later falling asleep while “dreaming of those little blue boxes and beautiful shoes.” Her post-grad plans involve a wedding in the Hamptons…Read full story: Toronto...

Just These 5 Lessons Made the MBA Worth the Money...

The best career decision I ever made was going back to school and earning my MBA degree. At the time, my employer footed the entire expense of that education but even if it had not, I had every intention of paying for it myself. Here’s why. My undergrad degree had been in journalism, which was the job I had for the first 10 years of my career. When I transitioned to corporate communications, I realized that there was a lot I still needed to learn about business. Earning the MBA degree has been an invaluable investment to me as a corporate professional. The education I received gave me a solid grounding in quantitative coursework such as statistics, finance, accounting and operations management. It also provided wide exposure to qualitative courses, such as organizational behavior, business ethics, project management and business writing. While many of the details for those classes have dimmed from my memory over the years, there are five major lessons learned from business school that I continue to use on a daily basis since completing that degree. 1. Teams make better decisions than individuals Almost every MBA course at the business school I attended required team projects and group accountability. This was during the early 2000’s, when the concept of teams within the workplace became the norm, and it has continued through today. Coming from a solo news reporting background, the “team concept” was a new experience for me. However, every team interaction since has reinforced this lesson that teams make better decisions than any individual in the group. Related: How Much Is An MBA Degree Really Worth? 2. Correlation is not causation Prior to my graduate courses in statistics I had thought that correlation (a mutual...

Faculty Feared Distance Learning Course Would “Cannibalize” Traditional MBA...

The executive director of a leading business school has said that his faculty thought a shorter, cheaper mini-MBA program would “cannibalize” the traditional MBA, highlighting the challenges that business schools face in adapting their content for the modern business climate. It is becoming increasingly difficult to take two years out of work to obtain a full-time MBA degree. Many students are instead turning to flexible and distance learning programs. These formats allow managers to maintain jobs, learning skills and networking in their spare time, often through virtual learning environments. Alan Middleton, executive director of Schulich Business School’s Executive Education Centre, said he faced internal opposition from his Dean and faculty in bringing a shorter program to market: “They saw it as cannibalizing the MBA,” he said. “[They thought that] surely if somebody can get the brand, and something that said ‘mini-MBA’, that would signal that once I’ve got that, why would I need to go on and get a full-time MBA?” Alan said. He said that domestic demand for MBA programs has been flat in North America and Canada, and there was “nervousness” about the “flat market”. Demand from international students has been strong but US business schools rely more on domestic candidates to fill their MBA programs than schools in Europe, which have a higher percentage of foreign students. Alan’s comments come at a time when professionals are turning to distance learning programs, which are often cheaper or free, in huge numbers. Business schools have been forced to come up with more flexible programs to keep their numbers up, but many remain fearful of investing resources in shorter programs which typically charge participants less in tuition than full-time MBA courses. Schulich has since introduced a Mini-MBA program. At...

Big Data Gets Master Treatment at B-Schools

B-school students can’t get enough of big data. Neither can recruiters. Interest in specialized, one-year master’s programs in business analytics, the discipline of using data to explore and solve business problems, has increased lately, prompting at least five business schools to roll out stand-alone programs in the past two years. The growing interest in analytics comes amid a broader shift in students’ ambitions. No longer content with jobs at big financial and consulting firms, the most plum jobs for B-school grads are now in technology or in roles that combine business skills with data acumen, say school administrators. But some faculty and school administrators remain unconvinced that the programs properly prepare students to work with analytics. The University of Southern California’s Marshall School of Business began its Master of Business Analytics program this fall with 30 students. About 50 to 60 students are expected to enroll in the $47,000 program next year, the school said.Read full story: Wall Street...

Steve Ballmer Goes to College: On Campus With Stanford’s New Professor...

The public knows only one version of Steve Ballmer: the blustery salesman, sweating and booming away and trying to rally Microsoft (MSFT) employees or win over investors. It’s not our fault that we think of Ballmer in this way; it’s his. He put on so many of these performances that he turned into a caricature. Yet, when you hear Ballmer reflect on his cheerleader persona, you know the public image of the man is incomplete. “What’s the old existentialist saying?” he asks me while we talk in a small office at the Stanford Graduate School of Business. “A man is the sum total of his actions. Even back through high school, when we first started to study this, I began to really believe it. This wasn’t ‘I think therefore I am,’ like the Cartesians. You’re accountable for what you do. You’re not accountable for what you thought. You’re not accountable for what you recommended. You’re accountable for what you actually got done.” “So, you know,” Ballmer continued, “would I do some of those things, if I could, back? Would I run around quite as silly as I used to? Probably not. Some of that is age. But I’m not embarrassed by it. I stand up and say, ‘Hey, it was part of what was important.’ It’s the way I felt. It’s part of what was important for my job. No, I stand behind it.” STORY: Steve Ballmer’s New Life With the Clippers The truth is that Ballmer is a thoughtful man who operates not in one mode but four or five modes. Most of us oscillate among different flavors of our personalities, depending on the situation. Ballmer, I think, has more extreme shifts. There’s the bombastic guy everyone knows:...

What to Look for in Online MBA Faculty

When Audrey McLaughlin was looking into online MBA programs, the Cleveland, Ohio, native cared a lot about overall prestige and program rankings. But she also paid attention to something more granular: the instructors. “I wanted the same faculty as the residential program,” says McLaughlin, who ended up enrolling in Indiana University’s online MBA program in 2013. “I wanted access to the same classes that I could have in person.” Vetting online MBA faculty is key, experts say, since instructors not only shape a student’s academic experience, but can also serve as helpful connections down the road. As a result, they suggest students follow in McLaughlin’s footsteps and research instructors, as well as the overall structure of a program’s faculty. “There are all kinds of models out there, and these are things that students should be aware of,” says David Sylvia, director of academic affairs for graduate programs at Pennsylvania State University—World Campus. One marker of a reputable online MBA program is shared faculty with the residential division, says Phil Powell, faculty chair of the online business programs at Indiana University. If an online MBA program outsources instruction, it’s a sign that school officials aren’t prioritizing the educational experience as they should, he says. “It’s a very quick and dirty way to differentiate whether the online program is seen as a strategic asset for the school or whether it’s just a quick way to make a buck,” says Powell, whose program, ranked No. 1 among online graduate business programs, uses the same faculty as the on-campus program. “All schools see their residential MBA programs as a strategic asset.” McLaughlin, who now works in North Carolina as a business support consultant, says online students benefit from instructors who teach the same...

IIT-Delhi to announce new MBA curriculum

IIT-Delhi’s department of management studies will soon unveil a new MBA curriculum to catch up with the world’s best in business management, officials said on Saturday. The announcement came after the Indian Institute of Technology organised a “MBA Curriculum Review Stakeholders’ Consultation Workshop” in a bid to respond to the changing times and catch up with the world’s best in business management education. According to a statement issued by the premier institute, the workshop focused on developing content that relates to the interests and demands of the industry. It also aimed at obtaining inputs in specific functional areas including information technology and business analytics. Lea la noticia completa en Times of...

Social Media Skills a Must for MBAs, Survey Says...

Students and applicants live and breathe through social media If you think social media is primarily good for reconnecting with long-lost friends from high school or stalking celebrities to find out what they had for breakfast, think again. Now more than ever, M.B.A. students and applicants live and breathe through social media, a new online survey reveals. And that level of social media use is a good thing, considering the growing demand in the business world for employees with honed social media skills. After polling hundreds of both prospective and current b-school students, The MBA Tour found that 85 percent of potential students worldwide say they use social media sites to research their top school choices. This is higher than the 71 percent of students already enrolled who reported using social media for their school research, suggesting a massive upward trend is afoot. Although most elite business schools use Facebook, Twitter, You Tube, and LinkedIn as part of their outreach strategy to potential applicants, it appears their efforts haven’t quite hit the mark. Approximately 14 percent of would-be students reported outright disappointment with their potential schools’ use of social media tools, or, while acknowledging that the schools had made an effort, 63 percent were left wanting more. For current students or graduates, 55 percent felt the social media options and subsequent classes were either “not up to par with the growing industry” (17.7 percent) or simply weren’t provided (37.7 percent). Additionally, 99 percent of students researching business schools reported social media was either a “necessity in every field of study” (51.7 percent) or “somewhat important dependent on the field of study” (47.6 percent)…Read full...

For Female Faculty, a B-School Glass Ceiling

It’s lonely at the top. That adage could be the mantra of female faculty at business schools across the country who have reached the coveted and most prestigious step of their career ladder, full professor. The number of women who’ve obtained the full professor rank in B-schools remains dispiritingly low, with fewer than one of five women business school professors employed today as full professors, according to a 2010-11 salary survey of female faculty by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB), one of the leading accreditation agencies for business schools. Women may still be far from a majority at most business schools, but the overall number entering the field has been steadily creeping upwards. Over the past 10 years, the number of female business school faculty climbed from 23.6 percent of total faculty in the 2001-02 academic year to 29 percent this year, according to the survey. The uptick comes as more women are considering careers as business professors; in the 2009-10 academic year, women made up 35.4 percent of doctoral students at AACSB-member schools, up from 31.7 percent five years ago. Despite the growing number of women entering the business school world, many appear to hit a stumbling block on the path to promotion, says John Fernandes, AACSB’s president. Women make up 40.6 percent of instructors and 37.3 percent of assistant professors. As women move up the career ladder and obtain tenure, the gender gap becomes more pronounced. Women make up just 29.1 percent of associate professors and a paltry 17.9 percent of full professors. “That is a huge drop-off rate,” Fernandes says. “I see the number of women faculty members in the classroom continue to change and increase, but I’m not so sure it...