6 Different Ways To Get Your MBA

Many b-schools now offer MBA programs with greater flexibility and more availability to a wider range of students The Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree is highly sought by individuals wishing to secure job advancement opportunities and higher earnings potential in the business world. Firms often look for MBAs because they graduate with a specialized portfolio of knowledge, skills and experience. Earning an MBA is both time consuming and expensive, and business schools are responding to students’ needs to have options when it comes to earning the advanced degree. Many b-schools now offer MBA programs with greater flexibility and more availability to a wider range of students. Two-Year Programs A two-year MBA program offers courses over four consecutive semesters. Due to the intense course load, they are ideal for students who will be attending school full-time and who are not concurrently working full-time. The first year is devoted to core classes and during the second year, students are able to customize courses to match their career goals. Areas of concentration include accounting, e-commerce, economics, finance, marketing and healthcare administration. One-Year Programs Students can also earn their MBA through one-year programs that typically last between 11 and 16 months, depending on the program. Though appealing to earn the degree in less time, there are disadvantages. The admissions process is very competitive, and applicants must demonstrate excellence in previous academic and work history. In addition, many firms prefer two-year MBAs for both job candidates and internship positions. Like two-year programs, one-year MBAs can customize coursework to match career goals. International Programs Attending an Ivy League MBA program is not the only option. A growing number of reputable international programs offer MBA degrees to students willing to relocate for one or two...

The B-School Case Study Gets a Digital Makeover...

New York University management professor Glenn Okun throws a 500-page, spiral-bound book of Xeroxed course materials onto his desk. The thick tome contains nearly 20 business case studies and represents just half the reading his students will plow through this fall—fairly typical of MBA courses. “Leafing through one of these is like leafing through the equivalent of the Manhattan Yellow Pages,” he says. Next, Okun unsheathes the alternative: an iPad (AAPL) edition of the same course materials—a feature NYU introduced last year. In each digital case study, students can highlight material in fluorescent colors and take notes. A tap on the screen allows them to skip to an exhibit at the end of a document, and then follow the menu back to where they left off reading—with no virtual or actual page-leafing required. All the features work offline. “Now,” Okun asks, “which would you prefer?” Case studies are the lifeblood of a business school’s curriculum. Each describes a company or economic scenario that actually happened. Students decide what they would have done had they been making decisions. As case studies migrate to tablet form, they have the potential to undergo some of the greatest transformations in the way students interact with the material since the case method was introduced at Harvard Business School in 1924. Over the ensuing 87 years, the case study has undergone some changes but remains much as it was at its inception—a straightforward narrative of business success or failure. Tablet technology may make the case study more of an interactive experience. HBS, Ivey Converting Cases to Tablet Harvard Business School, the largest publisher of case studies in North America, is in the process of converting 3,500 of its files to tablet-enhanced formats during this school...

Innovative sources of finance emerge for MBA students...

International students may receive loans without the need for a US co-signer You have sat your GMAT, written your essays, submitted your applications and been offered a place on that coveted overseas MBA programme. Now comes the hard part: paying for it. The credit crunch only exacerbated a problem that had been brewing for years, as the big banks and other traditional lenders pulled out of financing international students. However, the recovery of western economies and the return of jobs for graduating MBA students has done little to improve the situation for students who want to study overseas. “In terms of the wider market, it is becoming more difficult,” says South African Cameron Stevens, one of the founders and chief executive of Prodigy Finance, which is working with Insead alumni to help fund loans for students studying there. He points to the decision by NatWest to withdraw from the market in the UK as recently as January as further evidence of the parlous state of funding availability. Traditional banks are not suited to the idea of MBA loans, he says, because, however global they might claim to be, they operate as a series of national branches. “It [an MBA loan scheme] sits very badly in a local banking portfolio. What they [local banks] want is the high-income local managers. But they are forced to include international students as well, who are outside their remit in terms of offering other products and services.” The first signals of a crisis in funding for international students hit in the summer of 2008, when international students studying at schools such as Chicago Booth had to scrabble to put together loan packages. To help out its international students, Chicago Booth, along with schools such...

The $37000 Tweet

A new twist to the business school application process: asking applicants to use their twittering skills to impress the admissions staff Aspiring B-schoolers, it’s time to get your tweet on. The University of Iowa’s Tippie College of Business (Tippie Full-Time MBA Profile) announced a new twist to the business school application process today, asking applicants to use their twittering skills to impress the admissions staff. The school will award a full-tuition financial award package, valued at more than $37,000, to the student who most creatively answers an application essay question via Twitter, in 140 characters or less, a pilot program they’re dubbing the “application tweet.” “We wanted to do something a little bit different in our applications so we could get to know our students at a deeper level,” said Jodi Schafer, Tippie’s director of admissions and financial aid. “Since social networking is so prominent in business today, we thought this would be a creative way students could showcase their abilities and unique qualifications.” Students who decide to participate will have to answer the following question via Twitter: “What makes you an exceptional Tippie Full-Time MBA candidate and future MBA hire? Creativity Encouraged.” Unlike most business school application essay questions, which require an 800- or 900-word response, students will have to tweet their answer in 140 characters or less. Another enticing reason for students to participate? The school plans to waive the application fee, just for taking part in the experiment. The winner will be announced on Aug. 1. “I think because it allows a lot of creativity, it will just be interesting to see what students come up with,” Schafer said…Read full...

5 things MBA students must do before they graduate...

Graduating this year? You are still five steps away from getting that dream job India has more than 1,500 business schools as of now. Barring the top 50 to 75 colleges, most of the MBA colleges have very little to offer in terms of skills required to meet the demands of the job market. Since MBA is a professional degree, all we do during MBA should revolve around building a good career for ourselves. Students must strive to catch up with the industry needs and getting placed well. Here are five tips for MBA students to focus on in order to make themselves more employable. 1. Brush up your language skills Communication skills, undoubtedly, play a real important and crucial role in professional life in corporate India. For a fresh MBA graduate, it becomes all the more important from the campus recruitment viewpoint. If you are an MBA student, focus on polishing your communication skills in English and also learn a second language. It’s not a bad idea to join a finishing school to develop your personality, body language, inter-personal and social interaction skills. 2. Develop corporate awareness What a recruiter likes to see in a candidate is the application orientation. Students in B-school study the concepts of management in their classes but hardly understand how this knowledge can be applied in real business scenario; there is thus a gap in application. As students, it is imperative to understand what business is all about and how you can contribute to the growth of any organisation. That’s because if you can justify how your skills are going to add to the growth of the organisation, then chances are that the interviewer will consider you right-fit to the organisation…Read full...